Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats Creeped Their Way Into My Heart

By: Sierra Voss

Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats recent Gothic Theatre show was creepy, but epic.

Self-described as “crime wave”, Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats are a four-piece rock band that hail from Cambridge, England. They have four releases under their belt, and are currently on an international tour for their latest album, Night Creeper. Last week, they made a stop in Denver at the Gothic, and transported us into a world of creative expression:

Kevin (K.R.) Starrs.

Kevin (K.R.) Starrs.

There are those who headbang, and then there is Kevin (K.R.) Starrs, frontman and guitarist of Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats. Kevin walked on stage with a finger up to his lips, requesting the audience to remain silent as the band began their first song. From that point on you basically never saw Kevin’s face again, as it was continuously blanked by his hair. I stood watching Kevin in awe, as he gracefully thrashed about the stage while annihilating one guitar solo after another. He transcended the normal conception of headbanging. Now stay with me here as I get a bit deep with my analyzation of his activity. Your average headbanger will simply violently shake and whip their head in time with the beat of a song, but Kevin? Kevin’s different. He headbangs on off-beats, almost as if to punctuate a pause in the sound. His headbanging seemed more influenced by guitar lines, lyrical lines, and emotional undertones of songs than the actual beat. Never in my life would I have thought I would use the words stunning and dynamic to describe someone’s headbanging, but here I am.

Kevin’s whole performance was pretty mesmerizing. Every now and then, you could catch him twitching his head to the right. I couldn’t see his face due to the hair blanket, but I felt like he was almost biting at the air around him, or jolting to snarl at someone. It was super creepy and eerie. The band also kept from directly interacting with the audience for most of the show. The entire set felt like we were watching a scene from an old film noir or classic horror story. In the past, Starrs has stated in numerous interviews that he pulls most of the band’s artistic influence and vibes from his favorite old films.

Vaughn Stokes.

Vaughn Stokes.

Still need convincing on the eerie vibes of a Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats show? Simply read through the lyrics of one of their albums. Every song feels like a glimpse into a horror scene:

“Paranoid city at night
Shadows from under street light
People in fear day by day
NIGHT CREEPER crawling away”

-"The Night Creeper"

Yotam Rubinger.

Yotam Rubinger.

Right before the band left the stage for their encore, they played their tune "Slow Death". It was no doubt the most epic song performed all night. Kevin and Yotam Rubinger’s guitar lines and harmonies together were chillingly dynamic and beautiful. This band's ability to create such strong harmonies between the lead guitar and rhythm guitar is one of their most defining traits.

Starrs.

Starrs.

Overall, this show was f*cking rad. Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats truly created a world of their own, and I would go so far as to say that their set was by far my favorite rock show of 2016.

Catch this band on tour! Oh, and don’t make the same mistake as I did by not buying some of their sweet merch with graphics that encapsulate the creepy, raw vibe of their live shows and music.

Check out my favorite Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats song, “Melody Lane”:

-Sierra

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.