Telluride Bluegrass Festival: Where Legends Are Created Right Before Your Ears

By: Cy Fontenot

Every year festival-goers and music lovers of all types make their way to the historic mountain town of Telluride to experience the annual tradition of the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Surrounded on three sides by the rugged San Juan Mountains at 8750 feet in elevation, this festival seems to be the spawn of everything great about the Colorado bluegrass scene. This year, the fest takes place June 21st-24th.

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With various workshops and collaboration amongst artists happening all four days of the festival, there are many opportunities to meet and discover your new favorite bluegrass artists. Bands such as the Dixie Chicks, Greensky Bluegrass, The Lil Smokies, and Trout Steak Revival have all gained well-deserved success and notoriety by winning the Telluride Band Contest. This is a festival where legends in the genre are born.

This year’s lineup, including Sturgill Simpson, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Leftover Salmon, Yonder Mountain String Band, Bela Fleck, and many more phenomenal acts, is bound to be one to remember! It’s the festival’s 45th annual year running, and outside of the main stages, keep an eye out for the weekend’s late night shows where you might just catch the next big bluegrass rising star.

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Staying the whole weekend to catch every show possible? Camping in Telluride is nothing short of breathtaking. There are several campgrounds within walking or shuttle distance of the festival so make your tent plans here.

Don’t miss your chance to be a part of this year’s Telluride Bluegrass Festival! Tickets and all other info can be found here!

-Cy

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Winter Wondergrass 2018 Proved That Snow, Mountains, & Bluegrass Are The Perfect Festival Combo

By: Cy Fontenot

From frozen phalanges, to crashing on the floor like sardines, to uncontrollable laughter with some of the best friends you’ll ever make, Winter Wondergrass festival sure does attract a certain type of person, the ones who are willing to battle the cold and rally in the name of live music. If I learned anything at the fest, it’s that the combination of snow, mountains, and bluegrass create the best situational cocktail for bringing people together. As if the snowy mountains of Steamboat, Colorado didn’t do that already, add a little bluegrass and some Dale’s Pale Ale to the mix and there you have it: a wonderful freakin’ time.

Greensky Bluegrass.

Greensky Bluegrass.

The festival kicked off beautifully with Liver Down the River, who played just one note before and snow began! After being thoroughly pumped up by their funkadeligrass music, the crowd was serenaded by Trout Steak Revival who kept the music flowing into the evening, when Liver played yet another rockin’ set. The Wooks kept the energy alive for the Brad Parsons Band to wrap up the Wondergrass pre-party. As the night wound to a close, festies retreated to a set downtown by Colorado jamtronica up-and-comers Evanoff, who delivered a high energy dance party to cap the night off right.

John Stickley Trio.

John Stickley Trio.

Friday immediately started off with party vibes as we festival-goers made our way downtown for a delicious breakfast at Johnny B Good’s Diner, followed by smooth liquors at Steamboat Whiskey Company. After getting properly buzzed up, we made our way into the festival grounds where we were greeted by the Jon Stickley Trio, who had been joined on stage by some all-star special guests.

After a beautiful Steamboat sunset, Elephant Revival took the stage for an emotionally evocative set, playing whilst fireworks were shot from the ski hill above. For me, this remains one of the most perfect and beautiful moments of the weekend, and since the band are going on hiatus in just a few short months, it was even more special.

Grantful Dead Revue.

Grantful Dead Revue.

Just when it seemed the night couldn’t get more beautiful, Yonder Mountain took the stage, and so did the snow! After their heartfelt set, I made my way to the the gondolas and took a ride up to the top with some beautiful humans to catch the Grantful Dead Revue, where Tyler Grant had more than a few things to say with his fretboard. I think everyone agreed there was no better way to finish off the night than gettin’ down to some Dead tunes.

Fruition.

Fruition.

Saturday began with the infamous Bacon Jam, which took place in an absolutely gorgeous house on top of a mountain. Upon arrival guests were greeted by snowballs drunkenly lobbed from a hot tub. After entering the house I found great vibes, unlimited bacon, and WonderGrass all-stars pickin’ up a storm! After the Bacon Jam and a much needed nap, I made my way to the festival to see The Lil Smokies kick the afternoon into high gear. The Smokies were followed by Fruition, who had a perfect sunset set that sent the crowds partying into the night.

Next to the stage was the amazing Greensky Bluegrass, who played one of the most captivating sets of the weekend. As they plucked their last notes, I headed over to the Grand Ballroom, where Leftover Salmon, who were warming up for their killer Sunday night set. Paul Hoffman joined in midway through the set and the night went on ‘til morning.

Billy Strings.

Billy Strings.

Quick-trigger new kid on the block Billy Strings kicked off the mainstage Sunday afternoon with something to say. With outstanding vocals and masterfully edgy guitar skills, Billy brought the energy the crowd needed to power through the last day of this incredible festival.

As day turned to night, the people of Wondergrass reached a new level of love, intoxication, and anticipation as Leftover Salmon geared up to close out the fest. I have to give it to Leftover Salmon- out of all the amazing music I had the pleasure of experiencing this weekend, their capstone performance takes the cake as my most enjoyed set of Winter Wondergrass.

Leftover Salmon.

Leftover Salmon.

WWG was sold-out this year, proving people seem to really love Bluegrass in the winter. If you’re ready for round two, get your tickets to Winter WonderGrass in Squaw Valley, CA happening April 6th-8th here!

Check out our festival gallery from this event here!

-Cy

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Recapping RockyGrass: The Changing Face of Bluegrass

By: Riley Ann

Festivarians flocked to the 45th annual RockyGrass Festival this past weekend at Planet Bluegrass, and it celebrated the evolution of bluegrass in all of its facets. In the era of the folk renaissance in America, the first RockyGrass was held in 1973 and featured first-generation bluegrassers like Bill Monroe (the “father of bluegrass”) and Lester Flatt in addition to acts like Country Gazette that were part of the budding newgrass movement. A lot has changed since 1973, when 3-day tickets were only $12 and Bill Monroe himself was involved in starting the first RockyGrass (more about the history here). And yet, in the spirit of blending first-generation traditional bluegrass alongside newgrass of the time, this year’s RockyGrass held true to their own tradition.

Sam Bush.

Sam Bush.

What is notable at this year’s festival was the striking number of young faces on stage. In fact, eldest of all the instrument contest winners is only 21 years old. And yet Sam Bush was only 21 when he took the stage with The Bluegrass Alliance for the very first RockyGrass in 1973, which is evidence of young blood continually being drawn into the scene and sustaining the tradition through the decades.

Odessa Settles.

Odessa Settles.

What is notably different about more recent Rockygrasses, especially this year’s, is the growing representation of women on stage. Friday’s lineup included Colorado native Bevin Foley of Trout Steak Revival, Laurie Lewis with her band including renowned fiddler Tatiana Hargreaves along with special guest and Colorado native Courtney Hartman of Della Mae. Saturday featured powerhouse band leaders Melody Walker (winner the 2016 International Bluegrass Music Association’s Vocalist Momentum Award) with her band Front Country (nominated by IBMA as 2017’s Emerging Artist of the Year award) and followed by Becky Buller (nominated by IBMA at 2017’s Fiddler of the Year and by The Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music of America as 2017’s Songwriter of the Year award) as well as Odessa Settles performing with Jerry Douglas and Edgar Meyer. Sunday featured clawhammer banjoist Allison de Groot alongside Bruce Molsky in the Molsky Mountain Drifters as well as the all-female band and 2016 nominee for the IBMA Emerging Artist award Sister Sadie. Aside from the main stage, Denver-based Ginny Mules left the crowd roaring in a standing ovation during the band contest at the Wildflower Pavilion, and they won third place in the finals.

Tatiana Hargreaves with Laurie Lewis.

Tatiana Hargreaves with Laurie Lewis.

Although female representation is far from being equal, the bluegrass scene has come a long way despite its sexist reputation, like Alison Kraus being angrily told, “Girls can’t play bluegrass,” as she disclosed in the documentary High Lonesome: The Story of Bluegrass Music, one among countless other similar anecdotes of female bluegrass musicians in the book Pretty Good for a Girl.

Del McCoury.

Del McCoury.

While so many new faces are entering the scene, some have become iconic staples, and the return of Del McCoury, Sam Bush, and Peter Rowan along with newgrass favorites like The Infamous Stringdusters rounded out the festival to mix in the old with the new, giving something in the realm of bluegrass for everyone to enjoy.

The Infamous Stringdusters.

The Infamous Stringdusters.

Although this year’s RockyGrass has passed, you can still get your festival on for Folks Fest, which is happening in just a couple weeks from August 18th-20th. This year’s lineup includes Gregory Alan Isakov, Lake Street Dive, The Revivalists, Rhiannon Giddens (of the Carolina Chocolate Drops), The Wailin’ Jennys, Josh Ritter, Elephant Revival, Dave Rawlings Machine, and more. You can still get single-day and three-day tickets here.

View our full photo gallery from RockyGrass 2017 here.

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Kyle James Hauser's Music Featured In New Judd Apatow Film 'The Big Sick'

By: Hannah Oreskovich

If you’ve had the chance to check out Judd Apatow’s newest film The Big Sick, you may have noticed a familiar sound in some of the film’s scenes: Colorado’s Kyle James Hauser’s music is featured in the major motion picture.

Kyle James Hauser. Photo Credit: Lindsay Giles McWilliams

Kyle James Hauser. Photo Credit: Lindsay Giles McWilliams

Hauser has been involved in the Colorado music realm in some capacity since he was a teen in Golden, CO and his brother was playing Denver’s punk rock scene in Pinhead Circus. He’s toured with Gregory Alan Isakov, played as a member of Rapidgrass, and released a number of solo neo-folk recordings through Louisville, Kentucky’s sonaBLAST! Records. His first record Oh Oh debuted in 2012, and saw its songs featured in two MTV shows and several movies. Hauser’s last record, You A Thousand Times, was released in 2014 and actually held the #1 spot on Colorado Public Radio during that year. In total, Hauser’s music has been featured in over 12 films, and The Big Sick is the second movie his music can be heard in that has had a nationwide release.

Hauser expressed his excitement about his most recent feature saying, “It’s an incredible honor to have my songs included in such a moving story. For [the film] to be receiving the accolades it has is a dream come true, and is quickly becoming one of the highlights of my career. I can only hope to be a part of something this powerful again in the future and to help continue representing music made in our wonderful state!"

Currently, Hauser is the Colorado Music Strategy Coordinator at The Music District in Fort Collins. He also works with Sean King (Trout Steak Revival) on licensing deals for Colorado artists, manages the Detour Program at The Music District, and teaches songwriting at Berklee College of Music. Needless to say, Hauser is one awesomely accomplished Colorado artist & we’re stoked he garnered such a big opportunity with his tunes!

Photo Credit: Scott McCormick

Photo Credit: Scott McCormick

Ironically Hauser told us that he has no idea what the context of the scenes are in which his featured tracks will play in the film.

“I often don’t see the movies my music is in until the dust has settled,” he chuckled, adding, “But I am a big Judd Apatow fan.”

Listen to Kyle James Hauser:

The Big Sick premiered in LA on June 23rd and has a wide release on July 14th. Some Colorado theaters have showings slated as early as this week, so get yourself tickets!

In the meantime, make sure to check out Hauser’s music and keep up with all he’s involved in with Fort Collins’ The Music District. There are some big things happening there, and Hauser is passionate about sharing them and getting local artists involved.

Keep up with Kyle James Hauser on his website.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Jump Into Summer With Our 'Pickin' On CO Summers' Spotify Playlist

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Just in time for summer and the many folk & bluegrass festivals that come with it in Colorado thanks to Planet Bluegrass, here’s our ‘Pickin’ On Colorado Summers’ Spotify Playlist:

Tastemaker Sierra Voss has put some serious tuneage together for your summer soundtrack. Trout Steak Revival classically opens our pickin’ playlist, with tracks by Caribou Mountain Collective, Fruition, The Haunted Windchimes, Elephant Revival, Punch Brothers, The Infamous Stringdusters, Blitzen Trapper, Railroad Earth, Sarah Jarosz, and others. Several of these artists play the upcoming 2017 Telluride Bluegrass Festival.

Make sure to follow us on Spotify to check out our many playlists, and if you’re an artist looking to submit your song for playlist consideration, roll to our Contact page and do it!

Happy Summer.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

John Craigie's 'No Rain, No Rose' a Reflection of Life on the Road & Finding Home

By: Zach Dahmen

Singer/songwriter John Craigie has been everywhere, but his latest record takes him back to his new home base in Portland, Oregon. His affable character and quick wit make his live shows true entertainment, as I saw over a year ago. Each performance deftly moves from engaging story to poignant song. Seriously- spend ten minutes with this guy and you feel like you have somehow known each other for years. And that’s what’s so genuine about Craigie: He draws people in as a performer and as a person. Needless to say, I was excited about his new record, No Rain, No Rose.

John Craigie.

John Craigie.

Some of John’s storytelling skills have undoubtedly been honed by the road, and John spends over half his year on the road. He’s been traversing The States (and beyond) for years, picking up loyal listeners with his earnest music and endearing personality. Hailing from California originally, Craigie set out as a true troubadour years ago, touring and living on the road for an extended time playing gigs and even festivals like Burning Man. His touring eventually brought him through Portland, which cultivated his eventual move and settling into that community. This move is well-reflected in Craigie’s latest record, which was released this past January.

No Rain, No Rose is an album that feels like it is taking root. For Craigie that means a much more fleshed out sound compared to his previous, more stripped-down recordings. Beyond this, No Rain, No Rose is also packed with friends including members of Fruition, The Shook Twins, Gregory Alan Isakov, Brad Parsons, Bevin Foley (of Trout Steak Revival), Kat Fountain, Bart Budwig, Justin Landis, John Nuhn, and Niko Daoussis. From his old Victorian home’s kitchen, Craigie told me in a recent chat that he would call out players to jump in on tracks.

“We recorded inside the house I live in. All my housemates were there cooking dinner between takes, we set up in the living room, and people came by when they could and sat in on songs.”

These living room vibes fit Craigie well, and with the extended audio, the album has a sense of an intimate house party. It’s like your friends set down their glasses, picked up an instrument and created something so good it feels like it’s somehow yours as well. This style also gives the album some of Craigie’s classic levity.

The heart of No Rain, No Rose comes from the title track. Maybe the most personal song of the album, it’s a fully realized lament and celebration of embracing what is hard: “We need the bad things to make the good things, I know/And I hear them singing, ‘No rain. No rose.’”

"I really wanted to write a response to Portland after living here for a couple of years. All the songs that had been written in my time here.” Craigie told me.

Themes of the road, relationships, and aimlessness show an artist processing his past and looking forward to what is ahead. This record is a true reflection of community, with each song feeling like it has a life of its own while still feeling like a cohesive part of the record. Drawn out vocals and haunting melodies are captured in songs like “I Am California” and “Savannah,” with the the former including some lovely harmonies with Boulder’s own Isakov. Other songs like “Bucket List Grandmas” and “Michael Collins” are filled with strings, and give the feeling of a packed bluegrass jam. The whole vibe of the 13-song record takes real life and makes it just a little more pretty.

You can see John Craigie in Denver TONIGHT Thursday, March 23rd with Holly Lovell at The Walnut Room at 8PM. He has another Colorado gig in Pueblo at Songbird Cellars this Friday the 24th at 730PM. Make sure to keep up with Craigie’s continuing life on the road here.

-Zach

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Talking Festivals, Politics, & New Music with Dressy Bessy's Tammy Ealom

By: Claire Woodcock

Dressy Bessy was one of the first bands remnant of the Riot Grrrl movement in the early 90s based in Denver, CO. Lead vocalist, guitarist, and lyricist Tammy Ealom instituted the indie band, associated with the prolific Elephant Six Collective Recording Company, with guitarist John Hill (who also plays with the E6 band The Apples in Stereo), bassist Rob Greene, and drummer Darren Albert in 1996. After the band released four albums, Craig Gilbert superseded Albert on drums in 2005, and DB released 'Electrified' that same year on a new label, Transdreamer Records.

Dressy Bessy.

Dressy Bessy.

In 2008, when Dressy Bessy released their second record with Transdreamer, the stock market crashed, and the band learned the consequences of trying to tour through an economic recession. Then the country didn’t hear much from Dressy Bessy. In 2015, bassist Greene left, and the end of the Obama era was in sight. As a result, Ealom, Hill, and Gilbert started recording again, this time in their home studio. The product of this recording was 'Kingsized,' which Dressy Bessy released a year ago. Since then, the band has toured the country on the frontlines of a new wave of protest music.

Recently, Ealom spoke with me about upcoming shows and plans for a new record. Read on:

So I heard you went to D.C. recently for the Women's March on Washington.

I did, I did.

What did you think?

It was completely overwhelming and beautiful, and I'm glad I did it. It was beautiful to see so many like minded people come together to protest. I'm still in shock with all of these politics just like everybody else. I had never been in a crowd that big before and it was emotional. But you actually did feel a camaraderie and to feel in camaraderie with that many people at once can be overwhelming. It was incredible, and I'm glad I did it, and it doesn't stop there obviously.

What was your takeaway from being in D.C. that day?

I learned that we not in this alone; there are a lot of people who are freaked out and not standing for the way our government and our world is going with this new Trump administration. I think I'm suffering from some sort of post traumatic stress syndrome just over this entire year. Our album came out almost a year ago and we toured the country a couple of times all the way around, the whole time just sort of reaching out to people and just trying to get across how important it is and was that we're paying attention. I was a true proponent of Obama and I felt really comfortable with him as our president. He is an intelligent, calm person [who was] in charge of our country and it made me comfortable. I didn't obsess about politics everyday. Now I do. I wake up in the middle of the night and I reach over and I grab my phone just to check to see and make sure we don't have to put on gas masks, you know what I mean? Like this is such a crazy time.

Tammy Ealom.

Tammy Ealom.

Dressy Bessy dropped 'Kingsized' about a year ago-

February 5th last year.

So coming up on exactly a year after taking a considerable amount of time off, what has it been like to jump back into the world of album releases and tours during an election year?

It’s been amazing. The record came around about the same time civil unrest was starting, so it was amazing because I was able to go and let it out. I live for this shit. I've been doing it for 20 years and we're continuing on. We're planning a new album hopefully next year. I'm halfway there with new songs, and they just keep coming, so I'm going to take advantage of it and get it out there.

Any ideas on what Dressy Bessy’s next album’s going to be like?

That's a tough question because I don't question where my songs come from, I just let them develop like, ‘Okay, cool cool’ and a lot of times I'm not exactly sure where they came from. I don't sit down like, ‘Oh, I'm going to write a song today.’ Sometimes I just get this feeling as I lay there like ‘Oh God;’ it's like a ball of [noise] and I just let it out through song.

Rock, you just rock.

Rock and roll, that's all it is. It's all rhythm and blues.

Dressy Bessy got its start in Denver over two decades ago. How do you see the topics and songs you guys write about and play evolving over time?

Well, the internet was a big game changer. When our last album came out, Myspace was the place to promote your music. So I think [the internet’s] opened up a world where people can get their music out there. One thing, around 2008 before Obama came in, it wasn't feasible for a lot of bands to tour because gas was so expensive and people didn't have the money to go to shows. So that was kind of part of the reason we stepped back for a second too, because that was the way we went out and made a little bit of money to pay our rent. Now there's like a thriving DIY scene that's happening that more people hear about because of the internet. You kind of just take it day by day or month by month, it's like, ‘Okay let's go out and see what's happening.’

That's such a great point you make about the internet being a promotional tool for musicians. A lot of times I feel that my generation, millennials, myself included, take the access that the internet provides for music exploration for granted.

I mean, it used to be you'd have to send flyers out to street teams and you'd contact them through snail mail and then get their address and send packets of flyers. Now it's just as quick as Facebook. People are paying attention and they see [music] that way.

That makes me wonder how the internet has affected both your pre-existing fan base, as well as your new beginning. Because the people who were listening to 'Pink Hearts Yellow Moons' and were turning out for Dressy Bessy shows are a little older now...

We kind of knew that we'd have to rebuild our fan base, which is what we're doing right now and what we have done this year. It's just what we do, but we are finding our fans range from ages 4 to 70, which is pretty incredible. There are literally all ages at our shows, which is amazing. And a lot of our old friends who aren't paying attention every day are finding out. It happens every time we leave a city; the next day we get a load of messages: ‘Oh my God you guys are still going!’ And this happens every day: ‘Oh my God you have a new album! See you next time!’ And then they see us the next time.

I feel like 'Kingsized' definitely lends itself to a new generation of listeners that are looking for or to hear some sort of sanity in music, you know?

I appreciate that. It's a crazy world [laughs] it's just a crazy world. But yeah the struggle is always there and if it weren’t there, I don't think I'd appreciate what I do as much. It makes it real.

So speaking of the internet, your website teases more shows this year. Any idea when and where they'll be?

In March we're doing the Treefort Music Fest, which is a festival in Boise, Idaho. So we're planning to do some Northwest shows around that. The festival invites are coming in and we're sort of just using those as anchor shows to tour sections of the country at a time. Going out and covering the country all at once can be exhausting and physically, mentally taxing. We used to do six to eight week tours and just go do the whole thing and then come back just like [exhausted] you know? We've discovered that [for us] to keep our sanity, it's best that we go out max two weeks at a time, and just do regions of the country, and then come back for two weeks and go out and tour another section of the country. In March, we'll start doing some stuff. And we'll have Colorado shows within there too. We love Fort Collins and Grand Junction.

Awesome, right on.

Yeah it's coming. We're just trying to get a handle on it.

That's great that you're planning Colorado shows.

Oh of course. Denver is great, you know? There's a reason I've lived here for 23 plus years. I've always loved Denver. Whenever I travel, I'm excited to get home you know?

16473301_1311941575534250_2067741229250307108_n.jpg

It seems like everything went really well for Dressy Bessy since 'Kingsized' came out. I know you were sort of going into it without any real expectations, you were just kind of seeing what would happen, right?

Right. Just going in and doing what we do. I mean, if you put a record out and you expect the world to embrace you, you're bound to be let down. We do it because we have to, we don't do it because we strive to be rockstars or to be rich. We have to do this, so whether lots of people like it or not, we're still going to do it. It's a life calling for us. It's satisfying to go out for 300 people or 30 people or three people; it doesn't matter. If [the crowd’s] all into it, for us it’s completely satisfying. It’s like I always say, I just keep doing it, I keep doing it, I keep doing it, and after I'm done I'll have a legacy. It'll all be there for other generations to pick up on and perhaps be influenced by and it's much bigger than me. My music will live long after I'm dead and that's awesome. I'll take that. If the planet's still here, oh my God.

That's very forward thinking of you. So you see Dressy Bessy as a necessary voice in the industry right now.

I always have. My lyrics are always up for interpretation but I'm of the girl power generation, you know what I mean? Just speak your voice and don't take any shit. And a lot of my songs come about when there’s some sort of conflict, whether it be in my personal life or the world around us... it's sort of my way to just get it out. It could be protesting a relationship I have with a friend, or whatever. Writing songs is my way of getting any negative energy that I have towards a situation or a person or the world in general, just getting it out through song, if that makes sense.

Dressy Bessy is one of several Colorado bands who will perform at the Treefort Music Fest March 22nd-26th. CPR’s Open Air reported that local bands Trout Steak Revival, The Still Tide, Bud Bronson & The Good Timers, Dragondeer and Brent Cowles have also made the list. For the full lineup, which includes Angel Olsen, Mac DeMarco, The Growlers and plenty of other big names, go here.

-Claire

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 03/11, 03/12, & 03/13

By: Hannah Oreskovich

This weekend is jam-packed with awesome events! Check it out peeps:

Today (Friday 03/011):

Trout Steak Revival with Caribou Mountain Collective & Augustus at The Fox Theatre in Boulder 9PM-Close

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We’ve officially been talking about this show for weeks and it’s finally here! Come get down with us at The Fox tonight with one of Colorado’s favorite bluegrass bands, Trout Steak Revival! Nederland’s bluegrass quartet CMC will be sharing the stage, and Boulder’s rock trio Augustus will get the party started! We gave away free tickets to the show this week courtesy of The Fox, and some sweet Augustus merch from the boys themselves! So come boogie with us tonight. Tickets are only $14 and they’re right here.

Listen to Augustus’ EP Into Frames for a sweet show preview:

Asalott at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

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Awesome four-piece Asalott is breaking beats behind the big brown door tonight! We just launched a whole feature on the Boulder-based band by our contributor Will, which you can check out right here. Come dance with us at the show!

Check out Asalott’s live synth set at a previous No Name performance:

Tomorrow (Saturday 03/12)

Apes of the State, My Friends Worship Satan, The Opiate Poet, Dead Work, & Patrick the Pirate at The Forge in Boulder 630PM-Close


Pennsylvania’s punk folk seven-piece Apes of the State are making a stop in Boulder tomorrow night at one of our favorite DIY spots, The Forge. My Friends Worship Satan, a punk duo, will share the stage, along with The Opiate Poet, and “the most metal folk band that plays ska punk”, Dead Work. Plus, local favorite Patrick the Pirate will open the show. Come one, come all. It’s gonna be a great night.

Listen to Apes of State’s “Things I never meant to tell you”:

WadiRum at The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse in Boulder 8PM-Close

WadiRum’s name and sound are inspired by frontman Stewart Erlich’s travels in the Middle East. The music is “raw, powerful, silent and loud in turns, and ultimately healing… with lush harmonies, warm bass and cello, and drums that move from subtle to explosive.” Sounds sweet! Come give the group a listen over a coffee or some wine tomorrow night! We get the feeling it’s going to be something you just can’t hear anywhere else.

Learn more about WadiRum here

Realtalk at The Lazy Dog 10PM-Close

Realtalk.

Realtalk.

Fresh off their first Fox gig, Boulder’s Realtalk are headlining tonight’s show at The Lazy Dog. We love this Boulder-based funky rock group, and are super stoked for this set. Realtalk always brings the party, whether they’re playing Nelly covers or jamming out thoughtful originals like “Freddie”. So make sure to hit the LD tomorrow evening and par-tayyyy!

Watch Realtalk’s official music video for “Freddie”:

All Weekend (03/11-03/13)

Frozen Dead Guy Days in Nederland -Various Times & Locations-

It’s that time of year again: time to get weird up in Ned this weekend at Frozen Dead Guy Days! There are tons of events happening and, of course, music! Some of the bands on the schedule include Gangsterish, In The Whale, Strange Americans, Intuit, Na’an Stop, Cold River City, The Samples, Dragondeer, Powerlung Rangers, Gipsy Moon, Lady & The Gentleman, Gasoline Lollipops, and a whole lot more. Peep the full schedule here and make your way up to one of our favorite mountain towns! It’s gonna get wild.

Watch Dragondeer’s “Don’t That Feel Good” video by Jam In The Van:

And for our radio feature: 

PS: This week, our Sunday partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions will feature a track by Boulder’s Cold River City! The rockin’ funk and blues outfit are play Frozen Dead Guy Days this weekend (see above) and their new album Thank You. Sorry. Love You. is rumored to drop soon. Tune in Sunday night to any of the Colorado Community Network Radio Stations here (95.3 or 95.5 Boulder) or stream Green Light between 9-10PM to listen to their recently released single “Could It Be”!

See you out there Boulder bros and babes.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 03/04 & 03/05

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s feeling like spring around here folks, so get out there and catch a show! No snow means no excuses. Here’s The Six:

Today (Friday 03/04):

CITRA with HiFi Gentray at Illegal Pete’s in Denver 8PM-Close

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We just dropped a bit on CITRA and their debut EP Ocean this morning. Check that feature out here, and then head to Illegal Pete’s on S. Broadway in the D to catch this groovin’ four-piece live. They’re opening up a night of margs and burrito bowls for Denver’s HiFi Gentry, the rockin’ outfit composed of Andrew Kobil, Max Rutherford, Mark McKenna, David Beuerman, and Derek Slate. It’s gonna be a fun one kids. Check it out!

Peep a live performance of CITRA on KUNC:


Amoramora with The Elegant Plums at Merchant’s Mile High Saloon in Denver 9PM-Close

The wagon IS the original party bus people. 

The wagon IS the original party bus people. 

Remember “the band so nice they named it twice”? That’s Boulder’s Amoramora and they’re taking the stage at Merchant’s Mile High Saloon “for a night of high energy jams and pizza funk.” As doubled as their name, these boys are also playing dual sets this evening after classic rock and blues opener The Elegant Plums hit the stage. The two groups have actually teamed up with Bus to Show this evening too, so if you want to hop on the AMORAMORA RAGE BUS (WAGON), $10 gets you a ride both ways + entrance to the show. Get the details for that here. Party!

Listen to Amoramora’s get-down-funky “Behave Yourself”:

Ben Hanna & The Knighthawks at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

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Ahh how we love Ben Hanna. And tonight he’s in one of our favorite spots, rocking out with his full band behind the big brown door. Rumor has it Hanna’s dropping a new album in the near future. But until then, you’ll have to see him in person to hear all his recent thangs. So head for The Hill and catch Hanna’s rocking set tonight. It’s sure to be a sweet show.

Watch Ben’s latest viral video for one of his new songs here.

Tomorrow (Saturday 03/05):

Eldren with The Velveteers and Phallic Meditation at Hi Dive in Denver 8PM-Close

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Denver’s psych-space pop six piece Eldren are headlining a show at the Hi Dive this evening. Their mashup of “jazz, prog rock, jam, power pop, indie rock, and more” is bound to keep you entertained. PLUS Boulder’s The Velveteers will be warming up the stage with Demi Demitro’s killer guitar playing/vocals and John Demitro’s sick beats. Phallic Meditation is opening the night- the name alone tells us that’s one set we gotta see. So go get weird with these three awesome acts! Tickets here.

Lend your ear to Eldren’s song “Girl”:

The Letters Home and Boulder Sound Lab at Boulder House in Boulder 930PM-Close

If you want to explore some dirty soul partnered with some booty-shakin’ grooves, then hit Boulder House tonight for The Letters Home & Boulder Sound Lab show! The Letters Home, a six-piece from LA, recently dropped their mashup collaboration Mother Freakin’ Mashups Vol. 1. They plan to keep you dancing after Boulder’s BSL gets the party started!  So go grinddddd.

Check out Boulder Sound Lab’s groovy track “Psilos”:

The Next Day (Sunday 03/06):

Miles Wide Album Release Concert at Washington Park United Church of Christ in Denver 7PM-Close

Denver’s Miles Wide recently added two new members and dropped an EP, The Kindness of Strangers. Formerly the solo project of Kyle Donovan, the now trio actually recorded the EP in the church they’re performing this concert in. The Marquee called the album the “long lost love-child of Carly Simon and Art Garfunkel” so you know it’s good. This show sounds perfect for a Sunday evening- get yourself to it folks! Tickets here.

Listen to The Kindness of Strangers for yourself:

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PS: This week, our Sunday partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions will feature a track by Boulder’s Augustus! The rock trio are playing The Fox Theatre next Friday with Trout Steak Revival and Caribou Mountain Collective. Head to our Facebook page for your chance to win free tickets! And tune in Sunday to any of the Colorado Community Network Radio Stations here (95.3 or 95.5 Boulder) or stream Green Light between 9-10PM to listen to Augustus’ track “Bloodbath” live!

See you soon music lovers.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.