Desert Hearts Brought Their Creative & Colorful Vibes to Boulder on Current Tour

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It was a house and techno gathering without the grit: the Desert Hearts’ party last week at Boulder Theatre was a homey vibe with a very young crowd, and yes, most people showed up in costume. The 15+ and up show was full of colorful vibes.

Desert Hearts began in 2012 at Burning Man as a dream founded by Mikey Lion, Lee Reynolds, Porky, and Marbs. Since then, it has evolved into a mission of radiating love and a conscious ethos of house and techno. The quartet takes turns on the turntables and projects heavy percussion for hours, and last week’s party was no exception. The band’s vibe is approachable and lighthearted, which is why any age interested in getting into the techno and house scene would find Desert Hearts a non-threatening beginning.  

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Much like Burning Man, coming dressed up in costume is totally a thing at a DH gathering, and highly celebrated. There was an aura of a music festival like Electric Forest, where the crew also threw a party this summer. With a whiff of innocence in the air and plenty of time and space to dance it out, Desert Hearts won’t bring out the dark side of the bumpin’ house genre if that’s what you’re into, but if lightness and percussion within the comfort of your living room is what you’re after, this is a band you’ve got to check out.

Catch a Desert Hearts show for yourself here.

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Start The Workday Off Right With Daybreaker Boulder This Thursday (11/30)

This Thursday, November 30th, it’s all about the onesies. Boulder’s Daybreaker party is back, this time at Boulder Theater where the theme is “Furries and Onesies.” The crazy dance party, with a yoga practice pregame, has become an international sensation inspiring people to come together for a morning of fun to “seize the day” before heading to work.

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“We are so excited to have grown this event and host it at the Boulder Theater.” said Rachel Namordi, event organizer. “Our community has fully embraced this global movement, and we love that they want to start their day with movement, gratitude, and connection all before work and completely sober. We’re beyond inspired by how this has impacted people’s creativity at work and life, and how it’s brought multi-generations together through the love of dance, yoga, and real connection.”

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The morning’s yoga session will be hosted by Yoga Pod Boulder’s own Dan Carbondale and Rob Loud. Coffee, healthy juices and snacks, live performances, and free giveaways are just some of the things attendees can also expect to be included in the experience.

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Daybreaker Boulder will also help benefit local nonprofit Attention Homes for this event, the only shelter for youth in Boulder County. Attendees are asked to bring gently used clothes to the event to be donated to the organization.

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Yoga starts at 6AM; the dance party is from 7AM-9AM. Yoga & Dance tickets are $35 and Dance Only tickets are $25. Groups of three or more can get Dance Only tickets for $20 each when purchased together. If attending yoga, yogis are asked to bring their own yoga mat. For more information and to get tickets, click here.

See you in your best onesies, Boulder!

Boulder's rt60.co Curates Magical Shows At The Starhouse

By: Hannah Oreskovich 

Just above Boulder, after a short ride up Sunshine Canyon, sits a magical space: The Starhouse. Surround by 200 acres of open space, pine forests, and a killer view of Boulder, The Starhouse was constructed in 1990 as a living temple for trans-denominational spirituality. It was built by souls dedicated to sacred geometry and astronomy, so its entrance sits aligned with Polaris, and its acoustics are out of this world. The space regularly hosts Solar celebrations and Lunar events, but recently, I went for another reason: an intimate concert series curated by Daniel Herman of rt60.co and Mineral Sound.

The Starhouse.  Photo per The Starhouse.

The Starhouse. Photo per The Starhouse.

Herman has hosted a few shows recently at The Starhouse, all of which have featured local singer/songwriters unplugged in the natural acoustics of The Starhouse’s main wooden room. There’s a sort of sacredness to entering the place beyond the geometry- patrons are asked to remove their shoes, and meditation floor chairs and blankets are provided. There are candles along each windowsill, and after taking a seat, The Keepers of The Starhouse instruct you to turn off your phones and tune in to the present. That’s when rt60.co’s performers take the stage- the recent Starhouse lineup consisted of Megan Burtt, Paul Kimbiris, and Julian Peterson.

Julian Peterson.

Julian Peterson.

Julian Peterson opened the evening just as the sun set, playing a few tracks from his last record Get On This Train, along with his tune “Broken Man.” Though he’s played Red Rocks and The Boulder Theater in the past year, he admitted there is something different about playing The Starhouse.  

“This is so crazy up here! I feel naked.” he smiled, as the crowd laughed.

Julian’s sound is bluesy, soulful, and honest. He has a strong storytelling ability in his songwriting, and with an audience as silent as The Starhouse, it was easy to hear every intonation in Peterson’s range vocally. He ended his set playing a tune on his resonator guitar, which left us draped in delta vibes.

Paul Kimbiris.

Paul Kimbiris.

Paul Kimbiris was next, opening his set playing guitar and a kick drum, which he’s newly added to his live shows. He then brought up Philip Parker (Gregory Alan Isakov), who accompanied him on cello for the remainder of the set. With Parker's deep and swift cello sounds backing Paul’s bold vocals and guitar playing, it was impossible to be anything but present in their beautiful tunes. They played several tracks from The Dark Side of Pearl, and though Paul remarked that the two hadn’t shared the stage in quite some time, you’d have thought they’d just come off the road together with the touring chemistry of a string of shows just behind them.

Near the end of his set, as he looked around The Starhouse and into the crowd, Kimbiris smiled and said, “You know- I was thinking, and this- this is so Colorado.”

The Starhouse indeed felt almost like a cozy cabin at that point, with the sun gone, the moon hidden by clouds, and only soft lighting and the glow of candles illuminating the space.  

Megan Burtt. 

Megan Burtt. 

Megan Burtt closed out the intimate Starhouse evening; I had actually caught her set just the day before at Strings & WoodsWestword Music Showcase performance. Burtt has been a touring musician for years now, and this year is one of the first she hasn’t spent either constantly on the road or in the studio. Having played overseas, with symphonies, and at numerous local digs, Burtt agreed there is something different from anywhere else about The Starhouse.

“This is so vibey!” she smiled after taking her place at the front of the room.

Burtt played a couple of tunes from her record The Bargain, including a powerful rendition of her song “Anchor.” The room was exceptionally still for Burtt’s silky vocals- she transitioned between high and low tones with smooth and exceptional ease. She was accompanied only by her guitar playing, which, thanks to sacred geometry, all sounded as crisp and clear as if she were plugged in without her actually having been.

Daniel Herman at The Starhouse.

Daniel Herman at The Starhouse.

When the show came to a close, rt60’s Daniel Herman thanked the crowd as he remarked, “As someone who works in sound, having these artists play without amplification or anything is a sort of a therapy for me.”

I’d argue The Starhouse is a dose of therapy for anyone who has the chance to inhabit the space. Chakras aside, there’s really nothing like it, so make sure to attend rt60’s next curated performance in August.

Keep up with rt60 and check out more videos from this show here. And learn more about the mystical experiences that happen at The Starhouse on their website.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Pamlico Sound: Get Baptized in Funk This Saturday at The Lazy Dog

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Boulder's TPS are back in the game. 

Funk, soul, and psychedelia. That’s what Boulder’s The Pamlico Sound is all about. Formed in 2010, TPS has shared the stage with acts like Orgone, Kung Fu, Rowdy Shadehouse, The Magic Beans, and Technicolor Tone Factory. The eight-piece outfit have played The Fox, The Boulder Theater, The Bluebird, The Oriental, and many other local favorite spots. In 2014, the band took a hiatus as members worked on other projects, but they want you to know something Boulder: They’re Back! The Pamlico Sound will be throwing one crazy dance party at The Lazy Dog this Saturday, complete with a new killer rhythm section, an explosion of energy, and their “Jive Church” experience (just keep reading and it will all make sense soon young ones). In anticipation for the show, we sat down with the driving force behind the band, Will Baumgartner (vocals/baritone and soprano sax/flute/harmonica) to chat more about TPS and their plans for a 2016 takeover! Keep reading:

So Will, talk to us more about the “Jive Church” concept that TPS and their fans have been raving about since the band’s reformation. We’ve heard good things.

Glad you asked! The Jive Church basically turns our shows into an interaction between Pastor Will B (aka me, The Reverend Ever Ready), the Deacons (band members), Ghana Queen (our female vocalist), and the Congregation (audience) like so: As the pastor/reverend, I ask emphatically, “Can I get a ‘Hell Yeah’ from the Deacons?!”, to which the people onstage reply even more vigorously, “HELL YEAH!” Then, I turn to the audience: “Can I get a ‘Hell Yeah’ from the CONGREGATION?!” This often escalates to urgent calls of “Can I get a ‘F*CK YEAH?!’” And so on… Then, at least once during the show (usually toward the middle and the end), we offer a Funk Baptism, which consists of encouraging members of the Congregation to come to the edge of the stage (or up onto the stage itself), to be sprayed with Funky Holy Water (it’s a lot more sanitary than it sounds) while they writhe and contort in the Holy Spirit of the Funk. Our shows are also spiced up by brief “sermons” from me, Pastor Will/Reverend Ever Ready.

Wow. You literally spray people with Funky Holy Water and they love it?! I’m intrigued and impressed. Are you planning a lot of Funk Baptisms for Saturday’s show at The Lazy Dog? What else are you guys excited about?

Dang, that’s a GOOD QUESTION! In no particular order: Returning to our favorite small club in the homietown; our first show with new member (on trombone and vocals) Thom Holum; our second show with new drummer Curtis Collazo; the great likelihood of having some old friends/local luminaries sit in with the band; periodic stage diving into the arms of our beloved homiefans…

The Pamlico Sound bringing a funkadelic party to any show almost feels like an understatement for the picture my mind is making from all of this…

Yeah- we started out playing rager parties on the Hill to delirious hordes of sweaty wild-eyed lunatics, and that’s still how we approach every show: if you’re not sweaty, wild-eyed and delirious, you’ve mistakenly wandered into another show by a band of impostors. We are here to make you (and ourselves) feel ridiculously happy and free. And aside from the Jive Church shenanigans mentioned above, we always do things like sending the horn players out to wander amidst the crowd and play directly to them, “walk the bar” and so on; we also are known to frequently leap offstage and dance with crowd, and invite audience members to come onstage to sing and  dance with us.

The Pamlico Sound. Photo Credit:   Miles Photography

The Pamlico Sound. Photo Credit: Miles Photography

It sounds like to get the full TPS experience, we’ve got to come to a live show. We can’t wait! Beyond the insanity planned to rock the LD, what’s on deck for The Pamlico Sound in 2016?

We plan to give up sugar and coffee, participate in beauty pageants, and save kittens from trees. After we’ve done all that, we are planning to record all our new songs with Josh Fairman at Scanhope Sound (Josh has recently recorded/produced/mixed/mastered albums by The New Mastersounds, Atomga, and Analog Son, among others.) We’re also in the planning stages for our next Funkstravaganza, which is where we choose our favorite local funk bands and throw a big fat dance party with them at Cervantes’ in Denver. That will probably be happening in March or April. We’re also looking at festivals and regional tours.

Awesome! Anything else you want to tell us before Saturday, Pastor Will B?

Bring us your wired, your floored, your hugging bastards longing to be Flea.

Funk yeah. See you there Beaters.

Join the FB event here.

Watch The Pamlico Sound perform in the Radio1190 Studio here:

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to Ring in the New Year

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Happy New Year! We can tell it’s gonna be a good one peeps. Let’s ring it in together with some local shows! Here are our six to see throughout the four-day weekend:

Today- New Year’s Eve (Thursday 12/31)

Asalott New Year’s Eve Party at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

We love this Boulder four-piece and their trancy vibes. Come blast off into the new year with them at The No Name- they’ll have special guests performing with them, there will be a champagne toast when the clock strikes midnight, and there’s noooo cover. Plus there’s a masquerade theme! It’s gonna be a great time- get a cool mask and boogie with Asalott tonight!

Let your ears vibe with an Asalott original:

Dimitri y Rheanna NYE at Johnny’s Cigar Bar 9PM-Close

Dimitri y Rheanna.

Dimitri y Rheanna.

Bring in 2016 with some sensual, romantic jazz.” That’s how Johnny’s is rollin’ tonight. Boulder’s Dimitri y Rheanna are a duo aiming to “revive the old American jazz culture, also incorporating Brasilian, Spanish, and Gypsy styles.” Sounds pretty sweet! Plus local burlesque starlets Salty Vulgaire and Sangrhea will be there “for your sensual viewing pleasure.” Are they performing too? We’re not sure, but we know Johnny is excited and you should be too! Go check out the show.

Watch a live performance video of Dimitri y Rheanna here:

Tomorrow- New Year’s Day (Friday, 01/01)

Danny Shafer at The Pearl Street Pub 5PM-???

Danny Shafer. Photo Credit: Reggie Ruth Barrett

Danny Shafer. Photo Credit: Reggie Ruth Barrett

Local music staple Danny Shafer is playing his first show of the year tomorrow at The Pub, so go grab a brew with him! Shafer is Colorado’s troubadour, playing hundreds of shows a year throughout the state. But tomorrow you can catch him right here in the B and celebrate the start of 2016 with his sweet tunes. Roll on over!

Listen to Shafer’s stuff here.

Whiskey Autumn New Year’s Day Bash at Bohemian Biergarten 10PM-Close

Whiskey Autumn. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich.

Whiskey Autumn. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich.

There’s gonna be a banger at the Biergarten tomorrow and Boulder’s Whiskey Autumn boys are bringing it. The pop rock trio will be blasting the stage with some sweet beats and cool harmonies while you sip a boot. Peeped their recent electro pop single 07.04.07 yet? If not, watch the video below and then join them tonight at the BB for dancing and drinks!

Official 07.04.07 Music Video:

The Next Day (Saturday 01/02)

BeatSpeak at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

If you’re craving some soul and R&B sounds, BeatSpeak’s performance tonight should help you get your fix. The local four-piece “command the finest SoulCraft that whispers through and shakes rooms.” Sounds like a solid time! So roll over to Conor’s and get your groove on!

Listen to BeatSpeak here:

The Next Three Nights (12/31, 01/01, and 01/02)

Yonder Mountain String Band at The Boulder Theater 8PM-Close

If you didn’t catch their show last night, don’t worry Boulder, there are three YSMB shows left this weekend! The five-piece bluegrass outfit originally from Nederland, CO are going to be rockin’ the Boulder Theater stage at all three shows, with special guests Jerry Douglas and Stanley Jordan. Any band who can hold down four solid nights at the BT is worth checking out, so get your tickets here. Props if you hit up all four.

Watch "Drawing a Melody" live here:

It’s been a great year with you Boulder, and we’re excited for 2016! Thanks for all of your support and Happy New Year!!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See This Holiday Weekend (11/27 & 11/28)

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s a holiday weekend and there are some shows to explore as sweet as the pumpkin pie you nommed yesterday. Check ‘em out:

Today (Friday, 11/27)

Wildwood Roots at The Jamestown Mercantile Cafe Co. 6PM-Close

It’s hard to think of a better way to spend your holiday weekend than with the awesome regulars of the Merc. And tonight the Wildwood Roots will be providing “acoustic nectar for your ears.” The duo will be laying down some swooning originals and a few covers that are sure to make everyone headed to this mountain town dance the night away. The snowy drive is always worth it. Make the trek. And peep a track here:

Asalott with Gypsee at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

Asalott. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Asalott. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Asalott is bringing their Middle Eastern beat trance back to The No Name tonight and it’s gonna be a rad time. Their combination of Forrest Lotterhos on hammered dulcimer, Matty Schelling on his Octpad and Cody Hart on cajon is hypnotizing. Plus Gypsee is in town aka Boulder musician turned world traveler Will Buck. He’s been recording new tracks at The Crucible Recording Studio all week, so if you’re lucky, maybe he’ll lay one down for you tonight. Word on the street is he’s going to be jammin’ some flamenco-style guitar playing. Head out. And watch Asalott live here:

Tomorrow (Saturday, 11/14)

Ben Gallagher, Ben Hanna, & Brian Esau at The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse 8PM-Close

Ben Gallagher.

Ben Gallagher.

We’re dubbing this one the three Bs. Ben Gallagher is a Boulder-based singer/songwriter who “writes from the gut. . . and plays from the heart.” He’s been involved in a number of local projects over the years, but tonight he’s playing you some of his solo work. He’s self-produced two full albums, which you can listen to here. Oh Ben Hanna, how we love him so. We’ve brought you quite a bit of info on him lately, and you can read more here. Let him smirk his way into your cold heart tonight. And finally there’s, Brian Esau, a talented musician who will be playing you lots of original songs on guitar, sitar, and banjo. Check out his work (some of it with Ben Gallagher) here. And stream Ben Gallagher's album Heart Shaped Rocks here:

The Casino Effect at The Dark Horse 930PM-Close

We said it before and we’ll say it again: The Dark Horse somehow always has acts we’ve never heard of, can rarely find much info on, and somehow, the bands are unusually awesome to watch live. Here’s to hoping The Casino Effect are one such band, as we can’t find a single thing about them to share. So go get weird! Experiment! And report back to us…

Tallgrass at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

The gentleman of tallgrass.

The gentleman of tallgrass.

What have you been missing this holiday weekend? The stomping-ground sounds of Tallgrass, Fort Collins’ dirty soul trio. They claim to be “raised by wolves, taught by squirrels, and enemy of the owl.” How’s that for you Boulder? Sounds like it will be a great time, and this is the band’s only Boulder show before they set off on a Colorado tour. So go get at ‘em! And check out their video for "So Blind" here: 

Both Nights (11/27 & 11/28)

Leftover Salmon at The Boulder Theater 830PM-Close

Leftover Salmon.

Leftover Salmon.

Formed in Boulder in 1989, Leftover Salmon have become a Colorado staple, especially in the world of bluegrass. Their rootsy sounds have kept even the coldest Colorado mountain towns warm on blizzardy nights over the years. And this weekend, they’re returning to Boulder to celebrate 25 years in the slamgrass game with all of you. They have an extensive tour planned over the next few months, which you can peep here. But we recommend catching them while you can this weekend- get your tickets in advance here. Watch a live Leftover Salmon performance:

There are our picks for your Thanksgiving Weekend Boulder! Go work off your feast and hop to 'em!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Band of Brothers: A Sit-Down with Whiskey Autumn

By: Pete Laffin

Whiskey Autumn are all about their art.

WA. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

WA. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

I had the great pleasure of sitting down last week with Whiskey Autumn, a band I enjoy and admire, for an in-depth chat. They're headlining The Fall Showcase tomorrow night. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did:

I’ve been a fan of Whiskey Autumn for awhile. What I’ve always been impressed by since the first time I saw you guys is that the aesthetic you present isn’t based on a current “in” trend. Often, newly-formed bands put their finger in the air to see which way the wind is blowing: “I know, let’s start a new-grass band with a Fleet Foxes twist!” Rather, you guys settled into an aesthetic that’s very much not “in,” namely first-wave British Invasion. That’s what it looks like, what it sounds like; from your originals, to your covers, to the way David and Greg knock their heads around in your music video like a couple of Beatles bobble-head dolls. It’s very bold to go against the grain, but it’s even bolder to pick something so far from the norm. How did the three of you individually contribute toward defining this aesthetic?

Greg: That’s an interesting question. I guess it wasn’t a conscious decision to go toward or against a trend. We were all big Beatles fans. We all had the vinyl. It was the way we first bonded.

David: Greg already had Whiskey Autumn going before we met. Then we found Matty, and it was just one of those things: What do we all listen to? What do you we like? Because that’s going to be the fun stuff to cover. Being a band in Boulder, we have to play three-hour sets.

Matty: We’re not a jam band.

Thank god.

Greg: One of the first covers we honed in on was “Wouldn’t it Be Nice” by The Beach Boys.

Matty: Which is not an easy song. If you have the balls to play any Beach Boys song to begin with, that one isn’t high on the list. You need multiple strong vocalists.

Greg: And from a songwriting perspective, it’s incredible how quick the movements come in that song. It’s almost a classical piece in that way. We were really drawn to that. And especially on our first EP, we wanted to play some doo-wop.

Laffin with the Whiskey Autumn boys. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Laffin with the Whiskey Autumn boys. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

That’s the other direction you guys go: Motown. And while the subgenres aren’t the same, they happened within the same few years.

Matty: The one thing we all could definitely agree on was the music we would listen to when we were hanging out, which was Hard Day’s Night or Pet Sounds or Rubber Soul. For all of us, that era shines above everything else.

That’s really strange. That’s a very specific subset of music for three players to run with in this day and age. It must be daunting to think you are attempting to repave a way that has already passed. Your originals reflect this era, too. In light of this, what does success look like to you guys? A week from today? A month? A year? What are the expectations for pushing something no one knows they are looking for?

Greg: The success is making the art.

Matty: Great songs speak for themselves, regardless of the genre.

Couldn’t agree more with that.

Matty: Whether you’re reaching for one aesthetic or another, if the melody is strong and the lyrics are strong, it’s timeless. You can still listen to “Be My Baby” and it sounds just as fresh and magical as it did the first time you heard it when The Ronnettes put it out. In the studio, we just want our songs to be the best they can be.

So is that success to you guys? Making the best song you can make? Does moving up in the industry have anything to do with it?

Greg: I find the joy in the creating. That’s when I feel like we’re doing the real shit. It’s also a beautiful thing not having to answer to anybody, which we don’t right now, outside of budget constraints. The art is what lives on. Live shows are super important, but creating the records is where it’s really at. That’s what will live on.

Matty: The band has grown from a bedroom-folk thing to more of a rock band, and I come from a hip-hop background playing with DJs. We are always trying to build on what we know. It’s like advancing in math, always trying to solve more complicated riddles.

Behind the scenes of Whiskey Autumn's newest music video. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Behind the scenes of Whiskey Autumn's newest music video. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Having played here for a few years, what do you make of the Boulder scene?

David: The Boulder scene is different than the one I grew up in.

Where did you grow up?

David: Dallas. Downtown there were fifteen venues with three or four band bills and everyone supported and watched each other. If you played the nine o’clock slot, you would go over to another bar to support another band that had the midnight slot. Here it’s like, damn, we have to play three hours and be on every fucking song the whole night. Where I came from you got forty-five minute slots where you played the best songs you could in that time. Being here is like being a glorified bar band where you are in the background a lot and noise cancelling.

Do you think that’s because of a shortage of acts here?

Matty: It’s a shortage of venues.

David: That’s why we are working with other artists and BolderBeat trying to create a mid-level venue over at The Riverside.

Greg: You have The Fox or The Boulder Theater, but you have to build up a lot before you can get there.

Right, you have to be invited into the kingdom. Moving on: nostalgia and sentiment. Two very unhip things you also make hip.

Greg: Why thank you.

Everything you play, especially the songs you write, seem to be reaching back in time. Not just the aesthetic, but the lyrics, the mood of the sound.

Greg: I’m always trying to draw on things that happen to me, to think of them in scenes and tell a story. I’m trying to make a song out of the picture in my head that I see of the past. After you have had some time to think about things, you can understand them better. You put them through a different filter. You write a song about it and really understand what happened.

Band of Brothers. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Band of Brothers. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

In order to live together and be in a band together, you guys must get along pretty well.

Matty: There are times we want to punch each other in the face.

David: It’s gotten to brotherhood.

Matty: We have this family dynamic. We aren’t competing. We are a family and we want to do what is good for the family name.

David: Exactly. These guys are my brothers. I want them to be honest with me. Letting them down is worse than hurting yourself.

Matty: This has definitely been something different for me. It’s been very exciting. I was asked if I could fill in at first, which makes you more present. Count to four, count to six; whichever time signature we’re playing in. Stay in the pocket, keep it simple. I went into this thinking I was just filling in, which I love, even if it’s in a scene I’m not really into. It’s going to bring something new out of me. You just make a choice that it will be fun. And here we are nearly three years later, a repertoire of ninety songs we can play together, always having new musical ideas to bounce off one another. I could not have envisioned this is what it would become.

Check out the Whiskey Autumn trio this Friday at The Riverside where they are headlining The Fall Showcase. More details here.

Join the FB event here.

-Pete

All photos per Hannah OreskovichThis interview was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat. 

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 10/23 & 10/24

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Rain had yah inside watching Netflix all week kids? Well it’s time to get out and hear some tunes! Here’s your Weekend Six:

Today (Friday, 10/23)

Mitchel Evan & The Mangrove at Still Cellars 630PM-Close

Mitchel evan and the Mangrove and their matching suitcases.

Mitchel evan and the Mangrove and their matching suitcases.

Mitchel Evan & The Mangrove are a Boulder-based folk-rock trio who “bring together an eclectic sound of roots, rock, and blue music accompanied by tasteful harmonies and powerful lyrics.” We checked them out once at The Laughing Goat and it was a good time. Go grab your post-workday brew at Still and dance with these boys.

Many Mountains at The Laughing Goat 9PM-Close

Katie and Dustin of Many Mountains.

Katie and Dustin of Many Mountains.

Many Mountains consists of Katie Rose and Dustin Moran, who started playing together in Salt Lake City, UT before they moved to Colorado five years ago. They’re a couple and a musical duo who are going to bring some soft, sweet sounds to the LG tonight. Perfect way to jumpstart your evening on Pearl. Go check them out and listen to their track “Distant and Mythical” here.

The Indulgers at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

THEY WILL SHAMROCK YOUR SOCKS.

THEY WILL SHAMROCK YOUR SOCKS.

Celtic Rock. You heard me. It’s happening tonight at Conor’s. I’m not gonna lie- I’m a sucker for violins, so this seems totally worth checking out! The Indulgers are Colorado-based and they actually play quite a bit around the state. Their web URL is shamrocker.com. Need I see more? Watch their bio here:

Tomorrow (Saturday, 10/24)

The Powerlung Rangers at The Dark Horse 9PM-Close

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If you’ve never checked out music at The Dark Horse, you should probably head over because the names of the bands they book are always cray + I often have a hard time finding much info on them. Which makes the night a surprise that could take you in any direction. Who are the Powerlung Rangers? I don’t totally know, but I imagine if they were red ranger, they would use bong smoke to battle enemies. Show up, eat a burger, and live without expectations tomorrow night. Go Go Power(lung) Rangers:

Timber at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

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If you’re itching for Bluegrass, Timber is all yours tomorrow night! One warning, from the band: “While we do have a large Dutch fan base, we are not in fact a Dutch band.”  So there’s that Boulder! They’re local. Go howl with them at Conor’s and stomp around! It will definitely be a good time. Listen to their song “Little Maggie” here:

Both Nights (Friday, 10/23 & Saturday, 10/24)

The Floozies at The Boulder Theater 8PM-Close

The Floozies.

The Floozies.

The Floozies consist of producer/guitarist Matt Hill and drummer Mark Hill. This duo of brothers make catchy, electronic beats with party rock/funk vibes. They've developed a huge following and you can catch them either night this weekend at The Boulder Theater for only $20. Check out their song "Cheese" here:

See you at zee shows Boulder!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Realtalk: From House Parties to Headliners

By: Nikki Steele

What started as a house party band has become so much more.

Sean Campbell of Realtalk.

Sean Campbell of Realtalk.

If CU Boulder formed a band, it would sound exactly like Realtalk, which in a way is actually how Realktalk came to be. It’s hard to imagine how the Realtalk members would have met each other had they not been hanging in CU dorm rooms together and chatting at parties on the Hill. Realtalk has all of CU's favorite things rolled into one band: beats you can easily zone out to after breathing in some special Colorado air and a funkiness that makes you want to party and have a good time. But Realtalk’s music also has an awareness that there is more going on in the world than just the party lifestyle of your average college student.

A Hill House party Performance.

A Hill House party Performance.

After meeting each other and officially getting the band together, Realtalk started playing house parties, a lot of house parties. House parties come with the most casual networking known to mankind. Someone sees a cool band, asks them to play at their house party, and before you know it, you have played every weekend for months all over Boulder. And that’s exactly what Sean Campbell (lead vocals and guitar) and Julian Kitzmiller (drums) explained happened to Realtalk on this year’s summer break. Playing every single weekend had its benefits: Realtalk had a lot of chances to practice together, they networked to play different parties, and they built a legitimate Boulder fan base. The more times someone sees you at a party, the more times they remember you. And let’s face the facts- it’s going to take more than one booze filled night for people to remember what your band sounds like, so being the ‘unofficial house party band’ encourages some memory for even the most drunken of partygoers.

Although both Campbell and Kitzmiller enjoyed their house party stretch (and told me they would still play them today), they were excited when they started to actually book local venues. And their loyal fanbase from their nights on the Hill came in handy. When they booked Denver’s Bluebird Theater, where they opened for Rocktin, a lot of the faces they saw in the crowd were familiar. Talking to Campbell about the experience, he smiled, “When you’re up there and it’s a venue that can hold like 500 plus people and you realize you’re just this college band trying to make it, it’s a very real moment. You realize that people sell this shit out.” Which is exactly what inspired one of the band’s current goals: to sell out the Fox or the Boulder Theater.

Before taking the stage at the Bluebird.

Before taking the stage at the Bluebird.

But beyond parting, where does that awareness of world happenings that Realtalk sings about come from? Campbell explained that when he writes music, his lyrics are pretty personal. So when his brother started covering the Baltimore riots this year as a reporter, Campbell started getting a whole new perspective on what was happening in his home state. This new perspective led to Realtalk’s song “Freddie Gray.” The chorus, “It takes riots and violence before we are listening” was inspired after Campbell watched his brother covering the protests on the front-lines. A song like “Freddy Gray” is obvious proof that Realtalk is much more than just a college-made-party-band.

Post bluebird Performance. 

Post bluebird Performance. 

Since Realtalk has convinced Boulder cops to let the band finish a song before shutting a party down, played at the Bluebird theater to an awesome crowd, and written lyrics that give you goosebumps, what’s next for this local five-piece? First and foremost they are headlining a show featuring opener Whatever's Clever at the Lazy Dog tomorrow night! This is their first time headlining a gig, so get there! Realtalk also has plans to release an album by Christmas. And finally, Realtalk is wanting to connect with other musicians by creating a bi-weekly event where they meet up with other local artists and work on a song together. The idea is to give musicians that don't have a full band the chance to create an entire song, or to give full bands the opportunity to try something new. This event will be recorded live and they’ll toss the audio up on their website. Stay tuned for more info on this cool collaboration idea!

So who are Realtalk? As Kitzmiller says, “[We’re] a combination of energies coming together. When I go out there and play by myself, I get a certain amount of satisfaction, but I don’t smile or sweat or love life as much as when we we’re all out their playing [together]. That is what [Realtalk] is for me. I love playing with these guys. I love playing on stage, I love playing house parties; I love anything that allows us to just jam.”

Give Realtalk a listen here and catch them tomorrow night headlining the Lazy Dog!

-Nikki

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

David's Desk: TV On The Radio Burned the Boulder Theater Down

By: David Landry

TVOR burned the Boulder Theater down.

I’ve been listening to TV On The Radio for years now, but I never used to bump them on a regular basis. Until last Christmas. I remember the moment when my roommate picked me up from the airport and Seeds was blasting out of my shitty KIA stereo in the parking lot. It reeled me in and I was hooked; I felt like I was a teenager discovering a new, awesome album for the first time. It’s a ‘from top to bottom’ record for me.

Yes.

Yes.

Last weekend at The Boulder Theater brought me right back to those highschool rock and roll show days. It was all ages, so the big black Xs on the kid’s hands around me didn’t help with the nostalgia. TVOTR came out with a welcoming intro from their first EP Young Liars. Then they kicked us in the front teeth with their straight rockin’ “Lazerray” (watch the video if you haven’t seen it).

Aqua Rock.

Aqua Rock.

Everyone in the crowd was headbanging, and if I was in my early twenties, I might have been pushing some people to make a mosh pit. The crowd lost their minds when “Wolf Like Me” came on, and it was badass. Throughout their whole set, TVOTR kept the energy flowing and moved all over their discography.

Fists up. Hell yeah.

Fists up. Hell yeah.

I know TVOTR had a big show at Red Rocks the day after I saw them. But if you were at the Boulder Theater, you know we got the better show. After 15 years as a band, it’s insane that TV On The Radio can keep putting on shows like this. I can’t wait to be the old guy in another 15 years rocking, and maybe starting a mosh pit with the whipper-snappers.

-David at the desk

All photos per Kristy Gray. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Conor O'Neill's: The Closest Thing Boulder Has to a Mid-Level Music Venue

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Boulder doesn't have a real mid-level venue and it's a problem.

Conor O’Neill’s Traditional Irish Pub and Restaurant, or “Conor’s” as it is more affectionately known, is a venue we’ve mentioned before. They have music every night of the week, their open mic night on Tuesdays is notable for hosting up-and-coming artists, and the talented Danny Shafer books the entertainment for the venue.

An Irish Pub is somehow one of Boulder's best music venues. Photo Credit:   Westword  .

An Irish Pub is somehow one of Boulder's best music venues. Photo Credit: Westword.

At first glance, Conor’s looks a little like your average college joint. There’s a big front room with booths and chairs, a bar wraps around the right corner, and the stage is in the back. And let’s be honest, the stage is small. With a lack of mid-level music venues in Boulder, if we’re ranking stages, The Lazy DogThe Biergarten and even The Riverside probably place ahead of Conor’s. Conor’s also stacks all of their floor furniture behind the performing band to make room for a dance floor, which makes it a bit cramped, even for something like a three-piece. And bands have to run their own sound. But Conor’s still holds a special place in Boulder’s music scene, and this is why:

As mentioned, Boulder lacks mid-level music venues. Oh how we crave a Larimer Lounge, a Hi-Dive, or a Cervantes. Alas, we have none (investors, please approach). Boulder bands start in coffee shops or small bars, advance to a place the size of Conor’s, and then go on to play the worshiped Fox or Boulder Theater. This is the Boulder ladder; this is often the standard progression for a band in the Boulder music scene. Thus Conor’s is, in some respects, all that we have to hope for when we pray for a mid-level club. And this makes Conor’s a pretty great stepping stone for local talent.

Local Band Whiskey Autumn at Conor's. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Local Band Whiskey Autumn at Conor's. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Conor’s has a winning combination with Danny Shafer's skilled ear approving shows, a fun atmosphere, and the fact that it is (almost) always really busy. The drinks are decent, the place attracts a lot of college kids + a twenty-something crowd interested in music, and because the stage room has no real seating during shows, people become more engaged with the performers. You have to stand (like you would at a rock club), you have to watch, you want to dance, and usually you do. It’s always a party; it’s always a good time. Even on slower nights, I’ve never walked out of Conor’s wishing I’d gone somewhere else.

Dr. Dog's Secret Show at CO. Photo Credit:   Daily Camera

Dr. Dog's Secret Show at CO. Photo Credit: Daily Camera

Conor’s support and showcase of local music is our best shot of pushing performers into bigger Boulder venues, or into legitimate mid-sized Denver spots. Seriously- go catch a Conor’s show. You are guaranteed a good time, you’re supporting local music, you make it possible for Conor’s to support said local music, and your presence at a Conor’s show is living proof of what Boulder needs: mid-level music venues. So rock club entrepreneurs, where you at?

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.