Boulder-Based Nobide Are Making Waves One Big Stage at a Time

By: Natalie Pulvino

Boulder-based live electronic band Nobide is fresh off a show at the Boulder Theater, soon to headline the Larimer Lounge, and has a lot in store for this summer’s festival season. We sat down with Nick Vann, founder of Nobide, to ask him about the band’s authentic sound, local influences, and upcoming endeavors.   

What differentiates Nobide from other live-electronic acts?

Probably our versatility- we want to make all types of music, not get caught in one sound or genre. We’ve been working on combining the production elements with the live instruments, figuring out how to allow the produced pieces to function like a band member. Our live setup is pretty crazy- I can now manipulate and change the sound of the guys as they’re playing [and] do DJ production effects live which is pretty crazy.

You’ve described Nobide to BolderBeat previously as “organic-electronica,” emphasizing the live aspect to your music. What is your process for infusing the produced pieces with the organic element to create the perfect blend?

Our process is evolving as we figure out our sound. We’re still fresh as a unit, so we’re not sticking to any one process for writing or playing- it’s all very open right now. As far as putting songs together it’s really important to me that the songs don’t come out sounding like just another band. There’s so much possibility with production and sound… I’m always looking to hear something new, both musically and in regards to how a piece actually sounds.

Are there any local live-electronic acts that you draw inspiration from?

Mxxnwatchers is making some really forward thinking stuff, as is Evanoff. Break Science are the OGs. I think we all feed off each other, but we’re all sorta doing our own thing and pushing it as far it can go. To me that’s the ideal- there doesn’t seem to be much of a point in making stuff that sounds too much like someone else.

How do you cultivate that influence while maintaining a strong sense of authenticity in your music?

I think seeing how other people approach their music is the best kind of inspiration. We try not to take what other people are actually doing musically or sonically into account and just focus on doing what sounds best to us. In that sense we have no choice but to be authentic.

Nobide recently opened for The Floozies at the Boulder Theater- what was that like for the band?

It was a huge moment for all of us. I grew up in Boulder, so it was especially exciting for me. It was so killin’ to play for the hometown crew and have them show up like that. Nobide is Boulder-bred, and I think it was cool for the Boulderites to see the evolution of the project. A lot of people got introduced to the music that night too which was exciting. We’ve got mad love for Boulder.

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Are there any shows you guys have played that have been super memorable?

The Boulder Theater show was one for sure, as well as The Fiillmore when we opened for Sunsquabi in January. It’s always exciting to play big rooms with big sound systems. We played with Michal Menert in January and that was a full-circle moment. I’ve been listening to his music for years.

Nobide is on the bill for Summer Camp Music Festival, Sonic Bloom, and a few others that will be announced soon. What is the band looking forward to most about being on the lineup for these festivals?

I think mostly meeting new people- artists and fans alike. It’ll be cool to see how our music stands up and translates in new environments. It’s a big opportunity, but it’s also just gonna be fun as heck.

Do you foresee any challenges that may arise from playing festivals as opposed to singular shows?

It’s definitely going to be a compromise on some fronts [since] we have a pretty complex setup for performing, but it’s nothing we can’t handle. It’ll be a good challenge to be pros, to know it’s not all about us but more about the vibe of the whole event.

There’s been talk that the band may be hitting the road soon. If you guys go on tour, where would you want to play and who would you love to play with?

Eventually all over the world! But for now we’re trying to get down South and out to the West Coast and Midwest, start slowly expanding our radius through the U.S. We’d love to play with all sorts of people that like to get down. Lettuce, Pretty Lights, Zhu, Rufus Du Sol, Bonobo, Odesza… We want to bring this music all over!

Keep up with Nobide here and don’t miss their headlining show at the Larimer Lounge this Saturday, April 6th. Tickets & information here.  

-Natalie

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Dynohunter Evoke The Depth And Expansiveness The EDM Scene Is Craving

By: Mirna Tufekcic

Boulder, Colorado, a city closely associated with bluegrass and jam bands, is also home to thriving EDM musicians. Born out of the Lotus and STS9 jam scene, Boulder’s own Dynohunter is a hybrid of electronic dance music production and live band improvisation. Pulling electronic influences from house, techno, and electronica, while continuing to be influenced by their instrumental funk, jazz, and jam roots; blending electronic influences with live saxophone, drums and bass, Dynohunter evoke the depth and expansiveness the EDM scene is craving.

Dynohunter.

Dynohunter.

The trio has been around since 2010 and they’ve come a long way in their time as a band. Clark Smith has been keeping Dynohunter fresh with sax, keys, and percussion while mixing and producing the music, Fred Reisen adds the essential drooling low bass grooves, and drops a synth note when appropriate, Nic Thornsberry seamlessly kicks the drums and SPD-SX.  Blend these with tasteful original electronic soundscapes peppered with other organic instruments (like a conch shell, for example) and you got yourself an EDM journey deep into the universe (or jungle, or ocean, or insert your own temperature and atmosphere preference here). You are bound to at least bob your head, if you’re not fully compelled to dance.   

Watch Dynohunter’s recent live session at Knew Conscious:

Clark’s sparking creativity stems from his take on the music genre, “I just feel like EDM, Techno, and House music have so much untapped potential and unexplored pockets that intrigue and excite me. With other music genres, it feels like most avenues have already been explored.”

Dynohunter.

Dynohunter.

Early on in their career, the band played alongside the likes of Sunsquabi, Infected Mushroom, Shpongle, The New Deal, Papadosio and more. They’ve toured the country and have performed at music festivals coast to coast including Summercamp, Joshua Tree Music Festival, Sonic Bloom, and Arise. But along with their successes, the band has also dealt with tough loss. In April 2016, the band’s drummer and dear friend Justin Ehmer passed away after a long battle with cancer. Justin was a key member of the band who poured his heart and soul into the project. Since then, Dynohunter has pushed on, healing with time, but keeping Justin’s spirit alive in their music. A picture of his smiling face still stands behind the drums in Dynohunter’s home studio, a place the band has recently been working hard in.

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Dynohunter’s 2015 full length album The Nomad was well received; since then they have released four EPs, with Rattle the Cage being their most recent. Their fifth and upcoming EP titled Tilmun is scheduled for release on December 13th, with the single dropping December 6th, just a couple of days before they headline The Bluebird Theater in Denver.

Dynohunter at   Knew Conscious  .

Dynohunter at Knew Conscious.

Being a musical experience of their own, Dynohunter is well worth seeing live.  If you can catch them this Friday, December 8th at The Bluebird Theater, you’ll be in for a treat with fresh music right out of the studio and onto the stage.

According to Reisen, “[Dynohunter] sure has a way of bringing that experiential aspect of music to life and if you’re coming into it open-minded, you’ll be taken on a journey of higher vibration; an hour and a half experience that leaves you feeling a little bit better and expanded.”  Spoken like a true Boulderite, Fred!

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Festival Life In The Eyes Of A Taco Slinger: The Adventures of Super Heady Tacos

By: Sierra Voss

There is such a thing as a magical taco and it’s found deep within the heart of Colorado’s music festival scene. And after having experienced said taco for myself, I needed to know the secrets of this fantastic festival food. So I sat down with Bradford McDevitt, the creator of McDevitt Taco Supply (Super Heady Tacos), and Jesse Torrey, a chef of the taco goods and veteran in the festival taco slingin’ business. Check it out:

How did this whole taco adventure begin?

Bradford: Five and a half years ago, I applied for a permit to cook and sell tacos on Pearl Street Mall in Boulder, CO. My application made the top three that year, and was entered into the final cook off. I got one of the two available spots, and since then, it’s been a natural progression into music festivals.

How did you come up with the name 'Super Heady Tacos'?

Bradford: It’s a 13th century term meaning intoxicating or overwhelming. In the late 90s, the term was adapted to the marijuana culture; we have adapted it to taco culture.

Bradford McDevitt. Photo Credit: Tobin Voggesser 

Bradford McDevitt. Photo Credit: Tobin Voggesser 

What was your first music festival experience with the taco truck?

Bradford: Four years ago, in 2012 we went to Country Thunder. We don’t do that festival anymore. People who love country music are the worst humans on earth, in terms of how they treat vendors.

Jesse: Desert Rocks was my first festival with the Super Heady Taco crew.

How many music festivals did you do this year?

Bradford: This summer we did 10 festivals. Arise, Beanstalk, Divide, New West Fest, Riot Fest, Sonic Bloom, Summer Camp, and Vertexto name a few. In 2013 we did 20 music festivals. We hit the scene really hard, literally going from East Coast to West Coast. We did the big ones too, like Bonnaroo and Coachella.

Jesse: Yeah- it was 20 festivals in seven months. That's like 25,000 miles of traveling and slingin’ tacos. Basically, [we traveled] the circumference of the world within the continental U.S.

Bradford: Yeah after that we decided to mostly stay in Colorado. This state offers so many amazing festival opportunities. Plus, it's just more cost effective.

The taco light at the end of the festival tunnel. Photo Credit: Tobin Voggesser 

The taco light at the end of the festival tunnel. Photo Credit: Tobin Voggesser 

What are the best and worst parts of working a music festival?

Bradford: Interacting with new people all the time who constantly praise our food, atmosphere, energy levels and staff is one of the best parts. Everyone we deal with is on vacation, so everyone is in a great mood.

Jesse: You absorb people’s elevated energy levels at festivals. My lows are in between [gigs], waiting for the next music festival.

The Taco Tent. Photo Credit:  Sierra Voss

The Taco Tent. Photo Credit: Sierra Voss

What is the craziest music festival story you have for me?

Jesse: It happened this year at Summer Camp. Monday morning I woke up for loadout. Loadout days are hard; you are exhausted and everything is dirty and chaotic. Like, you literally just served 10,000 tacos out of a mobile kitchen. So that morning, I was riding a razors edge from maintaining my sanity. I started loading out, and there was literally a six foot long snake under our garbage can in the kitchen. I’m from Boston. I don’t know what poisonous snakes look like. All I knew was that this snake was huge and, like, coming after me. For an hour I tried to kill this thing with a 10-inch prep knife and a sledge hammer. It was like a battle royal. So I’m in this frenzy, a total manic moment: I can’t let this snake go ‘cause I’m thinkin’ he's gonna hide under something and I’m gonna pick that something up to put it away, and he is gonna get me! In my mind, after 80 hours of slinging tacos, I decided it was me or this snake. I love animals, but it was on. I finally whacked it. I cut its head off to bury it because I thought it was venomous. But before I buried the snake, I put it in a container and asked guests if they wanted snake breakfast tacos...

Long story short, that's the difference between working in a kitchen versus a music festival mobile kitchen. You have to be able to wrestle a six foot long snake to be a festival taco slinger.

Denver Riot Fest Taco Slingers: Levi Patton, Daniel Ward, & Jesse Torrey. Photo Credit:   Sierra Voss

Denver Riot Fest Taco Slingers: Levi Patton, Daniel Ward, & Jesse Torrey. Photo Credit: Sierra Voss

What’s the coolest thing about being a part of the Super Heady Taco team?

Jesse: There have been hundreds of taco slingers that have worked festivals with us from coast to coast. People have gotten married as a result of slinging our tacos. We don't just sling tacos, we provide people with a good time.

Bradford: You become a music festival name. Super Heady Tacos has become known as the secret third stage. We thrown on tunes, light up our disco ball, and get down. One guy came up to us at Divide Music Festival and said, “Dude you just put on a better show than Cake!”

So the next time you're at a Colorado music festival, have your taco cake and eat it too! Find this secret third stage, because I guarantee you will find delicious tacos, laughs, and a good time. And if you’re festivaled out for the season, don’t fret! Keep an eye out for a Super Heady Tacos restaurant location coming to Boulder early next year in the Meadows on the Parkway area on Baseline and Foothills. Peep Super Heady Taco's menu here

-Sierra

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Boulder's Tenth Mountain Division Headline Fox Theatre Tonight

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s back to school season, and local “ski rock” outfit Tenth Mountain Division have made their way down from the slopes and back to Boulder to headline The Fox tonight. For a band with some of its current members attending CU for school, the timing for this evening’s “August Après”-themed show couldn’t be better.

We last caught up with TMD before summer began, when the group was closing out their time in Boulder with a Lazy Dog bash. The five-piece kept busy in their off-season, touring through Chicago, Columbus, and PA before playing shows in Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. They even managed to play Illionois’ Summer Camp Music Festival on their way around the country, in a spot they competed for earlier in 2016.

TMD opening for Cold River City at The Fox earlier in 2016. 

TMD opening for Cold River City at The Fox earlier in 2016. 

Now, fresh off a night at The Aggie in Fort Collins, the Boulder-based band will take The Fox stage as headliners for their first time. Local prog rock/jam band Amoramora will hold down the second slot on tonight’s bill, and Durango’s bluegrass four-piece Streepland String Band will open the show. So whether you’re stuck in syllabus week at CU, or are looking for a great Thursday night show of local talent, head over to The Fox tonight. Tickets are only $10; get ‘em here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Tenth Mountain Division: Ski Rock for Your Summer

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Tenth Mountain Division dropped their debut album recently, and it's taking off like a skier on fresh powder.

Ski Rock. That’s the sound Boulder’s Tenth Mountain Division have coined for themselves, and it fits. With rock, jam, and bluegrass influences, the five-piece have been picking up notable steam  in the local mountain scene and beyond. Just this spring, the band released their debut album, Cracks In The Sky, which quickly earned them critical acclaim, a summer tour, and a spot on Illinois’ Summer Camp Music Festival. Before this rockin’ crew hits the road, we decided to sit down with co-founder MJ Ouimette to get the full scoop on TMD’s formation, their record, and more! The boys play a hometown gig at The Lazy Dog tomorrow for Cinco de Mayo, which you should definitely check out. Read on:

Boulder's Tenth Mountain Division. 

Boulder's Tenth Mountain Division. 

So MJ- how did Tenth Mountain Division get started, and how long you have been playing together as a band?

Winston Heuga and I originally met in highschool in our hometown of Vail, CO. After practicing together for a year or so, and writing our first original tunes, we decided to legitimize our music from the ground up; from Winston’s Mom’s basement to the stage. We had the idea to perform as a bluegrass band, since our main influences included Sam Bush and Leftover Salmon. Eventually, we evolved into an electric adaptation of our prior selves, and our “ski rock” sound was fully realized at CU, where we met Connor Dunn, Tyler Gwynn and Campbell Thomas. In total, TMD has been a project for a year and a half.

Wow! That’s sweet that you guys were able to put out your debut album within essentially a year’s time. Where was Cracks in the Sky recorded? Did you work with a producer, and if so, who?

Cracks In the Sky was recorded at KMG Life Inc. Studios. The album is self produced, but has largely been successful thanks to our sound engineer Cameron Mannix. He worked with us tirelessly and off the clock to help us achieve what we desired. Mannix had actually been working with us for the year leading up to our recording process on projects, and because he had that knowledge of our sound coming in, his work really contributed to the authenticity of Cracks In The Sky.

Awesome. What’s behind the name of the album?

“Cracks In the Sky”, the album’s title track, is the first song Winston and I wrote together. For the most part, he wrote it and I helped arranged the music and the middle verse. But the title, in short, is the easiest explanation of everything we’ve done up to this point.

Cool. Talk to us about the other tracks on the album. How did you choose what to record?

The songs we decided on put on the album are mostly an amalgamation of the diverse talents in the group. Be it my own “Morning Drive” and “Fine Print”, Winston’s “By the Riverside” and “Matryoshka Mountains” or Campbell’s “Conspiracy”, there is a diverse yet coherent congruency from song to song that demonstrates both our varied backgrounds and influences, and the intersections between them all that make us Tenth Mountain Division.

Awesome. Does everyone in the band write?

Winston has written many of the basic outlines and lyrics for the group; he is a great lyricist. Although I have a few songs lyrically that I’ve written as well, the basic formula is Winston presenting a sketch that I solidify musically with arrangements. There is always constant interaction and influence between all of us in the band though.

Listen to TMD’s Cracks In The Sky:

LP versus EP is always a tough question. How did you guys decide on releasing a full length?

Ultimately, we decided that it’s far too common to release an EP as a first recording effort, and we had too much material that we wanted to exhibit. When I look at my biggest influences, I don’t think about their first EP, I think about their first album. We collectively wanted to create an all-encompassing piece of art rather than just a fraction of it.

Fair enough. What are Tenth Mountain Division’s plans for the summer?

“Eskimo”, one of my favorite tracks on the album, will have a music video that will be released in the very near future. Beyond that, we’re touring the Midwest and East Coast, along with our appearance at Summer Camp Music Festival.

We saw you were on that fest lineup- tell us more about that!

We won Summer Camp’s “On the Road” competition series at the Fox Theatre in January, which allowed us the opportunity to perform at the event. It is both humbling and exciting to have won the event and to perform among the heavy hitters of the vast and talented genre of “jam” music.

Make sure to catch Tenth Mountain Division jamming at The Lazy Dog tomorrow night! Join the Facebook event here. And keep with this talented ski rock outfit here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured. This interview was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.