Review: Basement Revolver Are the New Faces of Scuzzy Dream Pop

By: Brody Coronelli

The Canadian trio teases their new LP Heavy Eyes with the lush single “Baby.”

Basement Revolver are no strangers to reverb. Their explosive and astral take on ‘90s rock, shoegaze, and dream-pop is soaked in it, calling back to bands like My Bloody Valentine and the Cocteau Twins while also harnessing a modern punk sensibility that renders them immediate and fiery.

Basement Revolver. 

Basement Revolver. 

The band have been on a steady rise over the last two years. After two EPs, they’re finally gearing up to release their debut full length Heavy Eyes this August. The first offering from the album is “Baby,” a lush, pop-forward, and anthemic track that sounds like a hazy recollection of a summer day long since passed. The song is dreamy, but also loud and forceful, as frontwoman Chrissy Hurn’s vocals echo through walls of sopping, melodic guitars, and the drums pummel in the background like distant thunder.

The album, due out on August 24 through Sonic Unyon and Fear of Missing Out Records, will feature a balance of new and old material. New songs like “Baby” are in the mix, and older songs like “Tree Trunks,” which draws a parallel between mental and environmental health, and “Johnny” (part one, which appeared on their self titled debut EP and part two, which appeared on their Agatha EP released last year), all of which chronicle the difficult end of a relationship.

"'Tree Trunks' was written when I started experiencing panic attacks for the first time, and my increasing need to find a professional who could help me to find better ways to cope. It also tries to mirror how I imagine the environment feels sometimes- and how the environment is tied to many people's mental health,” Hurn said in an interview with The Fader.

The album was recorded at TAPE studio in Hamilton, Ontario, the same place where they recorded their first two EPs. The band found their sound and nurtured its evolution in the same environment, creating a sonic progression in their discography that feels natural and inviting.

“[Working in the same studio on this album] also gave me the confidence as a writer to not take myself so seriously, to let myself get cheesy or goofy with some songs,” Hurn said in a press release for Sonic Unyon.

You can stream “Baby” below. Be sure to keep up with Basement Revolver here.

-Brody

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Taught By Members of The Flaming Lips, The So Help Me's Are Existential Rock For Your Soul

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Taught by members of The Flaming Lips and best budz with Denver’s Tyto Alba, Oklahoma City’s The So Help Me’s are rolling through Denver this weekend for a performance at The Underground Music Showcase. Slated for a 2PM set Saturday, July 29th at the Hi-Dive, this neo western shoegaze five-piece plan to shower you with plenty of dream pop and existential rock tunes. We recently chatted with the crew to talk about their trek here and all things summer. Read on:

We noticed you came together in 2014 at the Flaming Lips’ Academy of Contemporary Music in OKC. Talk to us about that experience.

John, our guitarist and main songwriter, was studying music education and jazz at the University of Central Oklahoma, along with three of our other members. We wanted to step out and start writing our own music, and The So Help Me’s really developed in garages and living rooms between college orchestra and jazz ensemble rehearsals. In these spaces, we felt free to write weird music and explore sounds and compositions in a way we couldn't in our school ensembles.  

When John transferred to the Academy of Contemporary Music for music business, we were just starting to establish ourselves as a band, and the school welcomed us with open arms. It was really crazy to learn from members of the Lips. We look up to them a lot and it’s an amazing opportunity to get to learn from a band we grew up listening to and really love. It’s almost impossible for me to see our band without the school. It’s a really tight group of world-class musicians and artists there, and everyone’s pushing for each other. There’s a beautiful thing happening in OKC.

The So Help Me's.

The So Help Me's.

Since your inception, you’ve released an EP, 'Relativity' (2016). What are your plans for future recording/releases?

We are putting out a single in the next month, as well as finishing an EP. We’re also in pre-production on a full-length album slated for release at the end of the year.

Listen to The So Help Me's Relativity:

We noticed you’ve had a couple of festival spots this summer. Tell us about those!

This year’s spring festival season in Oklahoma was bananas. We normally play 3-5 festivals in the spring, and this year we were rained out of three in a row because the weather in Oklahoma sucks. At one of the festivals we did play, some dude wandered onstage menacingly and looked like he was going to stab our singer Sophia. This dude got escorted off the stage by security and we were not even halfway through our set.

Whoa. What should Denver know about the OKC music scene?

OKC had a big influx of money due to Thunder basketball and some people are saying the city is going through a sort of renaissance. This being said, it still seems pretty evident to bands that you can't sustain a career in OKC. We know a lot of bands who have relocated, or focus a lot of their time and efforts on touring out of state, and it’s hard to blame them. Even the Lips only play in OKC once every five years or so.

We know you’re friends with Denver’s Tyto Alba- how’d you meet?

I think Tyto Alba were touring through to SXSW and we ended up being booked to play with them twice in one week somehow. They have this huge wall of sound guitar tone that blew us away. We hit it off immediately and became close friends- since then we've played several shows with them in Denver and had them out to OKC.  Our personalities vibe well, and we all share a really intense passion for guitar pedals and making music.

Cool. We’re excited you’re playing Denver’s The UMS! What are you most looking forward to about the festival?

We’re most looking forward to the weather not being a hundred billion degrees like it is in July in OKC. We’re excited to see Tyto Alba, Male Blonding, and The Velveteers play specifically, and we all plan on seeing as much music as possible. Huge festivals like this are amazing because you can walk a few blocks and see different genres and different bands everywhere you look. It’s a beautiful thing to have that many people together who share a common love for playing and listening to music.

Anything else in store for The So Help Me’s in 2017?

We plan on touring regionally several times in the middle of recording our album, and we have shows and festivals booked through at least November, so we’re definitely charging ahead full force.

Make sure to check out The So Help Me’s at The UMS this Saturday- tickets here. Keep up with The So Help Me’s on their website.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The UMS Is Bringing Three Awesome Acts To Boulder's Fox Theatre This Thursday (06/29)

This Thursday, June 29th, Denver’s new wave psych rock four-piece Flaural headline Boulder’s The Fox Theatre. The show, which is presented by Denver’s The Underground Music Showcase, is an exciting peek into a few acts on the festival’s 2017 lineup.

Flaural

Flaural

Flaural entered the Denver music scene in 2015 with their record The Thin King. Comprised of Nick Berlin (drums), Connor Birch (synth/keys), Noah Pfaff (guitar), and Colin Johnson (vocals/bass), the quartet released their sophomore EP, Over Imaginary Cigarettes, a year later. In the two years since their inception, the band has played more than 75+ shows across the US. They’ve shared a stage with acts like Thee Oh Sees, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, and Built to Spill, while also locking down sweet festival gigs including Treefort and Tomorrow Never Knows.

Ned Garthe Explosion.

Ned Garthe Explosion.

Two other UMS acts will open Thursday’s show- Denver’s Ned Garthe Explosion and Boulder’s The Velveteers. We went for a wild ride with Ned Garthe Explosion at last summer’s UMS, and they ended up being one of our favorite sets of the festival. Get ready for a party.

The Velveteers. 

The Velveteers. 

And for Boulder’s The Velveteers, this event will be one for the books, as it’s their debut Fox show, and a rare hometown gig for the busy duo. The two-piece have spent the past year on the road and in the studio between a European tour stint with Deap Vally and a number of festival appearances this summer.

Thursday’s bill is going to rip!! Come check out these amazing Colorado artists- tickets here and while you’re at at, grab your UMS festival passes! Full event details at this link.  We’ll see you there!

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Whole Milk's Debut EP Is Packed With More Than Just Calcium

By: Norman Hittle

Classifying themselves as beach goth/shoegaze, it's difficult not to be curious about Whole Milk’s self-titled debut EP. Thankfully, they do not disappoint, with a roster of dark surf-rock songs that also throw in elements of jazz and psychedelia.

With admissions of following in the footsteps of The Astronauts, Whole Milk’s songs also have nods to early Radiohead (circa The Bends and OK Computer) and even some remnants of the more dirge-ish compositions of The StrokesRoom on Fire.

This four piece- featuring Alec Reid on guitar and vocals, Kevin Netz on keys, Nate Ball on drums, and Devin Burgenbauch on bass- may be new to the scene as Whole Milk, but members roots roll back to former projects such as The Cut and Wolfhawk. Several of them have individually played the circuits of national festivals including Lollapalooza, Gathering of the Vibes, and the Vans Warped Tour with former projects as well.

Check out Whole Milk’s self-titled EP here:

The debut starts out by serenading us with “Aqua Milk,” an instrumental that sounds like a cross between classic Super Mario 3 Waterworld and Broken Bells’ “Trap Doors.” It then switches gears into the alt surf rock “I Don’t Miss You,” and back to the instrumental soundscape with “Mariana’s Lullaby.” “Psychedelic Spirit” follows with sonic remnants of its namesake, and into the droning, heavily distorted guitar filled “Hypnogaja.” The EP concludes with their final instrumental “Spooky Milk,” which reminded me of an eerie bossa nova-infused waterscape.

All around, this record is a fantastic first effort for Whole Milk’s debut. You can catch them appearing May 29th on Sounds, a music showcase hosted by PBS Channel 12 in Denver.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

NYC's DIIV Are Back On The Scene & Playing This Saturday At Summit Music Hall

By: Sierra Voss

New York’s DIIV are back on the scene and taking the stage at Summit Music Hall this Saturday, May 13th via Red Bull Sound Select Presents: Denver as curated by The UMS. The band recently posted on Instagram, “YES… the DIIV is playing some shows. Same clothes, new outlook on life. #soberville #day33.” Sick.

DIIV13thRBhandbill.jpg

DIIV formed back in 2011 by frontman Zachary Cole Smith. The band released their sophomore album Is the Is Are last year after a three year gap from their first release, Oshin (2012). DIIV’s albums are known for there swooshy guitar lines and sonic song structure. The dream pop, shoegazing vibe the band started back in 2012 has been deepened and elongated in their newest release. This Saturday’s showcase also includes openers Candace, a trio of full of psych dream tunes from Portland, as well as Colorado’s own surf pop indie rock outfit Slow Caves! This is a powerful bill, so come check out the show! Just for being a BB reader, you can nab $5 tickets here ($15 at the door kids). Get to it and stay tuned for our photo gallery from the show-

Listen to DIIV’s Is the Is Are:

-Sierra

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Chess at Breakfast's 'The Gutshalls'

By: Austin Michon

Somewhere between ambient, crawling ballads, and full force grunge rock, Fort Collins’ own Chess at Breakfast have carved themselves a niche in the alternative rock genre with their debut EP, The Gutshalls.

Listen to Chess at Breakfast’s The Gutshalls:

Mixing slow psychedelic sounds with cranked distortion, simple grooves, catchy riffs, and full-out sonic onslaught, Caleb McFadden, Justin Daggett, and Mike Davis intermingle each instrument into one cohesive unit. While some songs are reminiscent of a grungy, shoegaze style, others are a more modern indie rock experience, with each of the five songs seemingly highlighting a strength or focal point of the group.

In Hindsight,” a track I could see floating through a Buffy the Vampire Slayer intro, instantly transports you to the sounds of the 1990s, while “Andesite” takes you through a trippy, Pink Floydian sonic landscape, punctuated with moments of raw emotion and rock. “415” provides an almost jazz-esque groove which gives way to the trio’s characteristic heavier rock sound.

Chess at Breakfast.

Chess at Breakfast.

Somewhere between Modest Mouse, The Dear Hunter, and The Smashing Pumpkins, Chess at Breakfast have created unique, fun altrock that I hope to hear much more of. Be sure to catch them at Fort Collins’ Downtown Artery this Friday, April 7th with Race to Neptune and Turvy Organ. And keep up with Chess at Breakfast here.

-Austin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Denver's Indie Shoegaze Outfit Corsicana Play The Mercury Cafe This Thursday

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s Corsicana is the brainchild of 18-year-old Ben Pisano, who started the project in 2014 while still in highschool. With influences including Bon Iver, Death Cab for Cutie, Sufjan Stevens, and Tycho, Corsicana has evolved into a three-piece band live, with atmospheric soundscapes and a shoegaze ambience. Pisano (guitar/vocals) is accompanied by members Amos Chase (drums/synth) and Ryan Skiles (bass) for performances. And speaking of shows, you can catch this crew this Thursday (01/19) at The Mercury Cafe in Denver.

Ben Pisano of Corsicana. 

Ben Pisano of Corsicana. 

Pisano has recorded two EPs under Corsicana, the second of which caught the attention of Pandora Radio and is featured in the online radio’s catalogue. In September of 2016, Corsicana’s first full-length album Haven was released, a work which Pisano recorded himself in full as well. After the release of Haven last fall, Corsicana found themselves touring the Pacific Northwest and getting radio play on CPR’s OpenAir.

Check out Corsicana’s Haven:

Following their show at The Mercury Cafe this week, you can keep up with Corsicana’s 2017 gig schedule here. Whether you peep this ambient indie act digitally or at their show this Thursday, this is a band starting off the year with some sweet buzz from their release last fall, so lend them an ear. Listen to more Corsicana on their Bandcamp page.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

BolderBeat's 'November's My Favorite Indoor Sport' Playlist

By: Joliene Adams

Every month, we publish a new Spotify playlist of Colorado artists for your ears. Here’s our 'November's My Favorite Indoor Sport' playlist, because it’s bound to snow here soon and make you want to curl up inside with some good tunes, right?

BolderBeat's 'November's My Favorite Indoor Sport' Playlist: 

 

1. Candy Claws, Ceres and Calypso in the Deep Time (2013), “Into the Deep Time (One Sun)”

Best song for dreaming cozily in bed about ancient sea creatures emerging from the depths of the deep blue.

How old is the ocean? That’s where things get a little bit fuzzy. And Candy Claws’ own fuzzy dream pop fuels this question with echoes like reverb in deep time, a multimillion year operation of geologic formation. For such distortion and heavy chugging guitar riffs, the atmospheric effects across this track are as divergent from your typical “ocean sounds” as they are hypnotizing. Still, this song feels like you’re looking right into the ocean, taking in the crash of waves in slow motion.

PS: Candy Claws recently expanded into a new project, Sound of Ceres, who you can check out here.

2. shark dreams, Deeep (2016), “Frozen Love”

Best song for lying down on the bed you just made, hands behind head.

Crisp hits on closed hi-hat and drum rim snare your ears into the rhythmic tap of this tune. Warm electric guitar moves by, while layered male and female vocals float and intermingle. This one picks up speed across its first minute, only to hold back and slow down. These subtle shifts pull at your emotional tide, encouraging you to just feel the sensations as its sounds ebb and flow. Relax.

3. The Lonelyhearts, Years in the Great Interior (2013), “Princess of Rubble”

Best song for doing a sock dance to in the comfort of your own home.

At least that’s the first thing their breezy, playful, jaunt-worthy, ear-pleasing, non-lyrical vocals and sounds make me want to immediately do. The sound of longboards chuck-chucking over wooden slatted boardwalks would sound great with this jam on in your headphones. But this month is an indoor sport so I’ll settle for a sock dance on the hardwoods instead.

4. Josh Dillard, The Bright Light of Shipwreck (2013), “Ever Since You’ve Been Gone”

Best song to try and swoon your holiday crush with.

Dillard’s vocals come from deeper than his diaphragm. He’s not a heavy baritone or anything. Just plenty vocally soulful. I admire how he paces out syllables. Sometimes he lets vowels linger and sometimes he wraps them up in a neat quick-time that adds a certain freshness to his tunes. Anyone who sang this to me would definitely get a first date, provided they sang it with the exact same expressiveness that convinced me here we have a man with heart, personality, and poetry.

5. Anthony Ruptak, Between the Hangman and the Halo (2015), “The Bus Song”

Best song to let your mind wander away with.

Since you can’t go skipping flat rocks on the silver pool so easily this time of year, Anthony Ruptak brings the next best-feeling thing to your living room. This sweetly woven story of gratitude will waft right in over you and walk into your daydreaming heart. The harmonica on this track lends customary nostalgia. It’s a nourishing tune that brings it home, and makes it warm inside to boot.

6. Land Lines, The Natural World (2015), “Etiquette”

Best song to listen to when you wish you could be out hiking the trails.

The hand shaker really is a staple of percussive force. My hand wants to spasm just imagining keeping pace on this one. Ross Harada persists, but never intrudes or exceeds a wise clip of pace on this percussion, and that includes his drum playing. The complex instrumental variation of this one mixed with a certain sparseness in each instrument individually empowers the sonic valleys and peaks of “Etiquette.” I’m not sure whether it’s Anna Mascorella or Martina Grbac plucking cello here, but it’s the nicest touch this song could possibly have. Oh the views.

7. The Ghost of Joseph Buck, Scenic (2015), “Not About You”

Best song to splatter paint on your bedroom walls to in large, sweeping, unapologetic motions.

The Ghost of Joseph Buck would rather break your heart slowly. Polly Beck’s lead vocals come out sultry, lyrics a smidge salty, piano wisely. You have to listen for Stephanie Schooley on bass, but she’s there as much as the spinal cord that supports your body’s basic structure without you hardly thinking about it once. Marc Walker’s drums hold off on any and all cymbals and hi-hat until 2:04, a crux moment to the song’s bursting, multi-instrumental power crescendo and caterwauling vocals. The fact that together, the group winds this one back down to its original slower pacing at 3:15 is no less an impressive transition. Killing me not so softly, but in a welcome way no less.

8. Sur Ellz (feat. Kid Astronaut), Sur Ellz (feat. Kid Astronaut) (single; 2016), “Seasons”

Best song to bump the snow off your window pane with.  

Just because November’s an indoor sport doesn’t mean the soundtrack can’t be bumpable. Neo-soul and R&B have as much a job to do to here as mellow acoustic instrumentation or synthy shoegaze. Denver’s Khalil Arcady (Sur Ellz) and Jon Shockness (Kid Astronaut) conspire to bring you raw stories across fresh, smooth beats. Here are two men that don’t fear too much for their manhood to be lyrically vulnerable, to get sonically romantic, to sing about some real feelings. Electronically reproduced hand claps with what sounds like a snare-reminiscent drum machine hit mix with a simmering electronic warbling on slow-cook. Snow gone.

9. Mesita, With Love From Laniakea (2016), “Blank Slate”

Best song to curl up in your favorite blanket with.

A little Thom Yorke to the vocals, a little Nirvana’s “All Apologies” stylistically in the chorus, and the electro fuzz juxtaposed with what sounds like a xylophone played in a piano style, if you will, demonstrate my meaning. Solo act Mesita (James Cooley) doesn’t just do layers. He uses them to create his very worthy-of-a-listen ends: richly interlaced, juxtaposed interplays that create entirely new, richly textured soundscapes. He has a humble willingness in being limitless with what he’s willing to include. For Mesita, 1+1 never equals two. It always equals three, because he takes one thing plus another, and makes a whole new third one straight from it.

10. Moda Spira, Moda Spira (2016), “She Whispers”

Best song to shave your legs, lie in silk sheets, and lament with.

Gentle keys couple with tender and light acoustic guitar. As with the sound of whispering, there is a particular intimacy in Latifah Phillips (Moda Spira’s) singing. In "She Whispers", it’s not always the vocals, but sometimes the pauses taken between sung parts that lend the breathing room in which the sounds seep across your heart and emotions. Come to find out via Reel Gospel’s 2016 She Whispers album review, Moda Spira means “just breathe” in Latin. Her talent in piano is a mainstay in the stewing build of her protracted, draw-you-in musical magnetism.

11. Maxwell Mud, Maxwell Mud (2015), “I Just Wanna Be Good”

Best song to make a New Year’s resolution never to be good again.

Maxwell Mud, as would be appropriate for chillin’ inside, cooking soup, and contemplating, goes for the slow cook much like others on this playlist. However hard Brian Kitrell’s lyrics profess he just wanted to be good, it’s quite clear in his words, guitar riffs, Kenny Jones’ accomplice bass, and Kevin Johnson’s rock’n’roll blues drums that this is a foregone conclusion. At least in the present circumstances and context. His vocals are too steamy for anything but a pot on the brink of hot boil rupture-rapture.

12. Eye and the Arrow, Eye and the Arrow (single; 2015), “Tiger”

Best song to “look out at the cold night from your warm room at the bright moon on the white snow through the window frost and the forest shadows.”

Paul Dehaven has a marvelous storytelling song-voice, and he harkens on stories Portland’s The Decemberists might tell. His own finger flicks at the guitar, Jason Haas-Hecker’s slightly foreboding bass line, and Mark Anderson’s non-deviant foreword drumming collaborate with Dehaven’s story, vocals, and backup echoes to leave you listening to the very scene of walking through the forest when it’s too uncomfortably cold to actually do so.

13. Nearby Liars, Unlearning (2016), “Wither and Rust”

Best song to reflect upon your real feelings to in the bathtub.

Lyrically, this one doesn’t happen as an outright love song. It’s just that the rest sure sounds like a heart that’s known love, is reflecting upon it, and is expressing a definite fallout story of hard facts and cold truth love experiences. It’s lamentation, regrettable, and real. Riley Sbrana’s songwriting waxes and pounds with hard earned self-knowledge for better and for worse. The backup vocals on this one prove to be an emotive staple, and the light acoustic guitar sounds that nudge their way in at 3:20 are the most perfectly subtle, elegant touch.

Thanks for playing with us this November, Colorado. Make sure to follow us on Spotify and take a listen to this playlist and more Colorado music playlists at BolderBeat.

-Joliene

All tracks per the artists featured. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Eros and the Eschaton Release Sophomore Album, 'Weight of Matter'

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Back in 2012, Eros and the Eschaton were a North Carolina-based experimental duo comprised of couple Kate Perdoni and Adam Hawkins. In 2013, the two put out their debut record, Home Address for Civil War, on the coveted indie label Bar/None Records (Alex Chilton, Yo La Tengo), which gained critical acclaim as a shoegaze pop hit. Fast forward to 2016, and you’ll find Eros and Eschaton at their new home base in Colorado Springs, CO with members Alex Koshak (drums), Ryan Spradlin (bass), and Mitch Macura (keyboards) filling out their lineup. Just last Friday, the group released their sophomore album, Weight of Matter, also on Bar/None Records. And we have really been diggin’ on it.

Eros and the Eschaton.

Eros and the Eschaton.

In the span of just a few days, Weight of Matter has garnered some major buzz with reviews in Consequence of Sound, Scene Magazine, and more. The band’s single, “Rxx”, has been all over CPR's OpenAir, and this Friday, the group is throwing their album release show at Larimer Lounge with Colorado favorites I Sank Molly Brown and Maybe Baby & The Bitch Boys.

The album artwork for  Weight of Matter .

The album artwork for Weight of Matter.

Weight of Matter remains loyal to the band’s pop styling roots from their previous release, while also showcasing the talents of each musician in the group. There are beats to keep you moving mixed with Hawkins’ atmospherically dreamy vocals on the band’s tune “Cry”, there are tasty bass lines behind Perdoni’s flawless garage-y vibes on the album’s single, “Rxx”, and Macura’s keys can be heard stringing together fantastic melodies throughout the album while Hawkins riffs you away into shoegaze oblivion. Weight of Matter manages to play with elements of alt rock, classic pop, atmospheric indie, and garage punk (sometimes even within the same song), all the while remaining a smooth, well-composed, and lyrically inventive work of art.

The album’s single, “Rxx”, which is worth mentioning all on its own, is everything a great neo-psychedlia/shoegaze track should be: poppy keys that invite you to the stage over rocking guitar riffs, a low-end of bass bumps and drum thumps that keep you moving, and Perdoni’s echoey vocals carrying you through the 60s and 70s in what could be a massive indie radio hit. As Perdoni told Consequence of Sound in a recent interview, “Rxx” is made up of “novel flashes in rock and roll history”, and it’s done with an infectious energy that feels exciting and upbeat rather than longingly nostalgic. It’s addictive to listen to.

Eros and Eschaton are an exciting act to have floating around the Colorado music scene, and Weight of Matter is a stellar album. Check it out for yourself here, preview a few songs from the record on Bar/None’s website, and make sure to get yourself to the band’s Larimer release show this Friday! Tickets are $10 in advance; $12 at the door.

Keep up with Eros and Eschaton on their Facebook.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.