#SheShreds: Rockygrass Celebrates Breaking Through the "Grass Ceiling"

By: Riley Ann

In light of of the #MeToo movement and “The Future is Female” shirts, this year’s Rockygrass certainly took some cues from the times. In addition to the staples of the Planet Bluegrass stages (including Sam Bush, Tim O’Brien, Peter Rowan, and more), a spotlight shone brightly on the women who have become pillars of the “who’s who of bluegrass.”

The First Ladies of Bluegrass. 

The First Ladies of Bluegrass. 

 

One of the crowd favorites of the weekend was the Friday set featuring Alison Brown, Becky Buller, Sierra Hull, Missy Raines, and Molly Tuttle, each the first woman to earn International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) awards on their instruments. They’ve been dubbed “The First Ladies of Bluegrass” for this achievement.

In the set, Sierra Hull acknowledged Alison Brown, who was the first woman to ever earn an IBMA nearly three decades ago in 1991, which happened to be the same year Hull was born. Brown also earned the Distinguished Achievement Award in 2015, which IBMA states is the “highest honor IBMA bestows outside of induction into the Hall of Fame, recognizing forerunners and ambassadors for bluegrass music.” Hull, who is 26, shared that when she was a little girl, she loved Brown’s album Fair Weather and still does, saying, “It’s such an honor to share the stage with Alison- and all of these incredible trailblazing ladies!” The set oscillated from sweet harmonies to rip-roaring bluegrass breakdowns, and between tunes the musicians gave frequent props to each other for what they’ve contributed to the modern history of bluegrass, like in regards to Missy Raines, who has earned an IBMA for Instrumental Performer of the Year on bass seven times. “We like to say that in bluegrass, Missy reigns!” they said.

The weekend featured a variety of women outstanding in their field, including Della Mae, an all-female band that earned a Grammy nomination for “Best Bluegrass Album” for their record I Built This Heart in 2015. During their set on Saturday, Celia Woodsmith, current frontwoman for the band, also gave a shout-out to the “First Women of Bluegrass,” noting the two consecutive days of all-female bands in the lineup. She hollered, “Rockygrass, you’re doin’ somethin’ right!” and the crowd roared.

Sunday’s spotlight included the Lyons Bluegrass Collective, featuring local powerhouses KC Groves (of Uncle Earl), Bonnie Sims (of Bonnie & the Clydes), Natalie Padilla (of Masontown), and Sarah Cole (of Follow the Fox), among others, male and female.

These women were not celebrated because they are women; they are celebrated because they’re good, and despite the odds. While bluegrass music grew from the roots of Black music (even the banjo is actually an African instrument that’s been morphed through industrialization), it has been culturally appropriated by white men who have kept a patriarchal stronghold on it for generations, causing a great deal of sexism, racism, and classism within the genre. I discussed some of this in last year’s coverage of Rockygrass, “The Changing Face of Bluegrass,” and more in-depth information about the history of the banjo and bluegrass music is available via two great documentaries: The Librarian and the Banjo and Bela Fleck’s Throw Down Your Heart.

Although you’ll have to wait until next summer for the next Rockygrass, Folks Fest at Planet Bluegrass is still to come and includes Regina Spektor, Indigo Girls, Los Lobos, Jeff Tweedy (of Wilco), and more. You can learn more about Folks Fest at the Planet Bluegrass website here.

See our full gallery from the fest here

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos provided to BolderBeat by the artist. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Folk Fights Back: Rachel Baiman Brings New Protest Songs Through Colorado

By: Riley Ann

Folk music is no stranger to politics, and Rachel Baiman isn’t afraid to make waves. Her new album Shame is getting accolades from NPR’s All Songs Considered, Paste Magazine, and The Bluegrass Situation, among others, and for good reason. The album is fierce, playful, even snarky, and it’s the perfect patchwork of the Americana tradition, spanning grooves reminiscent of Sam Bush (like the title track, “Shame,” and “Never Tire Of The Road”), to classic country fiddle (like “In The Space Of A Day”), to the Gillian Welch-esque melody of “Take A Stand,” all blended with her Old-time roots and modern voice. The album is available to stream and purchase in digital, CD, and vinyl formats on her Bandcamp.

She’s sharing her new batch of tunes on tour in Colorado this week. Aside from performing live on KGNU’s Kabaret show on Tuesday, August 8th, Rachel is playing the Starhouse concert series in Boulder along with local favorites Natalie Tate and Gabrielle Louise this Wednesday from 7:30PM-10PM (more information here). She’s also playing a show in Denver at Globe Hall on Thursday, August 10th with The Wind and the Wave, an indie-folk/alt-country band from Austin, Texas.

Similar to Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, and so many other folk musicians that have walked this path, Rachel’s songs are steeped in the social commentary of the times. She said, “They originated from broader political issues, but with what’s happening in the world today, they get more and more specific in their meaning every day.”

Rachel Baiman.

Rachel Baiman.

Her politics don’t stop with her own music. She is one of the co-founders of Folk Fights Back, a non-profit organization that curates concerts around the world to raise money for local organizations working for social and political changes. Previous concerts have raised funds for environmental justice, immigrant and refugee rights, LGBTQ rights, women’s rights, and more. Rachel said, “It was really a way to channel our energy into things that are important to us. Sometimes it’s hard to feel like you’re making a difference, but we’ve raised thousands of dollars for local non-profits doing really important work, and it brings people together in a positive way. There’s so much power in our solidarity.” Learn more about setting up your own Folk Fights Back concert by visiting their website.

While this is Rachel’s first full-blown tour in Colorado, it certainly won’t be her last. However, it might be your last opportunity to see her in such an intimate space as the Starhouse. You can find more about that show and her other tour dates on her Facebook page and her website.

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos provided to BolderBeat by the artist. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Recapping RockyGrass: The Changing Face of Bluegrass

By: Riley Ann

Festivarians flocked to the 45th annual RockyGrass Festival this past weekend at Planet Bluegrass, and it celebrated the evolution of bluegrass in all of its facets. In the era of the folk renaissance in America, the first RockyGrass was held in 1973 and featured first-generation bluegrassers like Bill Monroe (the “father of bluegrass”) and Lester Flatt in addition to acts like Country Gazette that were part of the budding newgrass movement. A lot has changed since 1973, when 3-day tickets were only $12 and Bill Monroe himself was involved in starting the first RockyGrass (more about the history here). And yet, in the spirit of blending first-generation traditional bluegrass alongside newgrass of the time, this year’s RockyGrass held true to their own tradition.

Sam Bush.

Sam Bush.

What is notable at this year’s festival was the striking number of young faces on stage. In fact, eldest of all the instrument contest winners is only 21 years old. And yet Sam Bush was only 21 when he took the stage with The Bluegrass Alliance for the very first RockyGrass in 1973, which is evidence of young blood continually being drawn into the scene and sustaining the tradition through the decades.

Odessa Settles.

Odessa Settles.

What is notably different about more recent Rockygrasses, especially this year’s, is the growing representation of women on stage. Friday’s lineup included Colorado native Bevin Foley of Trout Steak Revival, Laurie Lewis with her band including renowned fiddler Tatiana Hargreaves along with special guest and Colorado native Courtney Hartman of Della Mae. Saturday featured powerhouse band leaders Melody Walker (winner the 2016 International Bluegrass Music Association’s Vocalist Momentum Award) with her band Front Country (nominated by IBMA as 2017’s Emerging Artist of the Year award) and followed by Becky Buller (nominated by IBMA at 2017’s Fiddler of the Year and by The Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music of America as 2017’s Songwriter of the Year award) as well as Odessa Settles performing with Jerry Douglas and Edgar Meyer. Sunday featured clawhammer banjoist Allison de Groot alongside Bruce Molsky in the Molsky Mountain Drifters as well as the all-female band and 2016 nominee for the IBMA Emerging Artist award Sister Sadie. Aside from the main stage, Denver-based Ginny Mules left the crowd roaring in a standing ovation during the band contest at the Wildflower Pavilion, and they won third place in the finals.

Tatiana Hargreaves with Laurie Lewis.

Tatiana Hargreaves with Laurie Lewis.

Although female representation is far from being equal, the bluegrass scene has come a long way despite its sexist reputation, like Alison Kraus being angrily told, “Girls can’t play bluegrass,” as she disclosed in the documentary High Lonesome: The Story of Bluegrass Music, one among countless other similar anecdotes of female bluegrass musicians in the book Pretty Good for a Girl.

Del McCoury.

Del McCoury.

While so many new faces are entering the scene, some have become iconic staples, and the return of Del McCoury, Sam Bush, and Peter Rowan along with newgrass favorites like The Infamous Stringdusters rounded out the festival to mix in the old with the new, giving something in the realm of bluegrass for everyone to enjoy.

The Infamous Stringdusters.

The Infamous Stringdusters.

Although this year’s RockyGrass has passed, you can still get your festival on for Folks Fest, which is happening in just a couple weeks from August 18th-20th. This year’s lineup includes Gregory Alan Isakov, Lake Street Dive, The Revivalists, Rhiannon Giddens (of the Carolina Chocolate Drops), The Wailin’ Jennys, Josh Ritter, Elephant Revival, Dave Rawlings Machine, and more. You can still get single-day and three-day tickets here.

View our full photo gallery from RockyGrass 2017 here.

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Reinventing the String Band: Darol Anger Forges A New Tradition

By: Riley Ann

String players in the Front Range had a real treat this past weekend. Living legend Darol Anger and the Republic of Strings, which features violinist Enion Pelta-Tiller of TAARKAand Joy Adams of Half Pelican on cello, hosted a workshop at Naropa before performing a concert in the evening on Sunday, April 23rd as the conclusion of their most recent Front Range tour. The full ensemble, which included Emy Phelps on guitar and vocals, Mike Robinson on guitar, and Eric Thorin on bass, played an evening concert the same day.

Darol Anger. 

Darol Anger. 

Darol Anger has made an indelible impact on the evolution of the fiddle. From his early days with David Grisman to the Turtle Island String Quartet, and his 2012 release of Chops & Grooves with Rushad Eggleston and Casey Driessen, Anger is no stranger to stretching possibilities and breaking rules through innovative techniques. His Fiddle-ology workshops are aimed at sharing these techniques that Anger helped developed in contemporary styles, techniques which transcend any particular genre. “I’m a failed classical player,” Anger laughed, “but that’s why I teach: to be the teacher that I wish I had.”

Nearly 50 string players attended the workshop, including fiddlers, cellists, mandolin players, and a harpist. Ages and experiences ranged as well, from kids under 12 who have played most of their lives, to touring professionals who make their living performing music, and adults who have recently picked up their instrument for the first time in decades, or recently picked it up for the very first time. Each participant shared their journey with music. “I played violin as a girl and put it down for a few years, but I just picked it up again after retirement,” said one fiddler, smiling. Another shared, “I’ve played professionally in symphonies for years, but you don’t get much exposure to music like this in Miami.” Despite their differing paths, all of the participants were looking to expand their musical vocabulary, whether it was getting out of habitual solos, diversifying their backup techniques, or even learning to break away from classical training to freely improvise.

Phelps, Thorin, & Robinson.

Phelps, Thorin, & Robinson.

The Republic of Strings are the perfect performers to share these techniques. Philosophically, the ensemble disregards limitations and borders. As articulated in their bio, “Our shared Republic Of Strings’ imaginary borders extend through all geographical or other imaginary borders, and we accept no unsightly cultural boundaries. We revel in variety and seek to deeply understand.” Such is true musically as they blend the folk music spanning the world, including Scandinavia, Africa, South America, urban America, Appalachia, and more with neo-classical, blues, jazz, hip-hop, bluegrass, and postmodern influences, ultimately weaving together a new tapestry of music that defies compartmentalization in any genre or style.

Pelta-Tiller & Anger.

Pelta-Tiller & Anger.

The partnership between Pelta-Tiller and Anger is also unique and longstanding. “Darol and I have been friends for a very long time,” said Pelta-Tiller. “I grew up listening to him in the Bay area and would go see him with my parents when I was really little. After college I was staying at my parents, and I took some lessons with him,” she said. Since then, they have taught at some of the same fiddle camps and see each other at festivals. “We’ve been friends for a long time, and I’m really excited to be able to bring him out here,” she said.

Joy Adams.

Joy Adams.

Although this was the first workshop of its kind at Naropa, Anger and Pelta-Tiller are considering the possibility of doing more area workshops in the future and even expanding what those workshops offer. The full calendar of events can be found on Naropa’s website, including this summer’s Creative Music Workshop, which focuses on improvisation. Pelta-Tiller and Adams are also both teaching at the Rustic Roots campfire jamming camp in Moffat, Colorado this August.

-Riley

Find out more about me on my blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

"Let's Build An Album Together!": Riley Ann's Latest Project Is All About Fem Rock

By: Claire Woodcock

Colorado's Riley Ann is ready to release her latest batch of songs. There’s just one problem:

“I want to move forward with not only recording this project, but also my whole music career. But when there are so many bands willing to play for so little, it’s hard to make a living as an artist. If you turn down a non-paying gig, there’s someone else behind you who’s willing to play for exposure. It undercuts everyone else and it really has a negative impact on the entire music community.”

Riley Ann’s path from fiddling folk in Illinois with The Matriarchs to her dynamic one-woman folk rock band paved her route to Colorado. Since her move in the fall of 2015, her presence and drive have initiated various collaborations, like her Old-time duo The Darling Ravens, and a new bluegrassy pop trio, DJ Meow Mix & the Grabbers.

“Although I have several musical projects going, this album is my passion project. Now that I’m back from tour, I’m getting an all-female rock band together. My new tunes need a full band, and that’s the perfect way to showcase them live.” she recently told me.

Riley Ann.

Riley Ann.

Her story of how, in a year, she became a vocal advocate for musicians to get paid a living wage for their art, is a story that many music transplants in Colorado’s bumping scene have had to grapple with.

“Artists deserve to get paid for their art. Playing simply for exposure devalues the music,” she said. “And when that mentality spreads, how do musicians make a living? It’s not going to be through album sales or digital sales. On Spotify I get one-tenth of a cent per listen. You can’t make a living on that.”

Riley Ann launched her Kickstarter campaign in November, teasing her first single “Bloodhounds,” which was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Jay Elliott (IntroVertigo Recording) and Dominick Maita Mastering, both of whom are based in Boulder, Colorado. The single is an authentic sample of Riley Ann’s new sound from the forthcoming album, which features a full rock band.

“Bloodhounds” is dark and gritty, with roots in Old-time and a heart in rock’n’roll. Riley Ann’s single was recently featured on Colorado Sound as part of Chris K’s Colorado Playlist. Her vocals are vibrant, carrying the same electric currents in the realm of female frontwomen like Angel Olsen, St. Vincent or Mount Moriah.

“I’m excited to get these songs out into the world and I don’t want to risk having to record them one at a time as I can afford them,” she reasons. “Because the longer I wait, the longer they’re going to sit, and the more dated they’re going to sound. They sound current, they sound contemporary, and they just fit right now within this renewed appreciation for the fem rock scene. It’s kind of like when Mumford & Sons came out. Everyone tried to sound like Mumford & Sons, but by the time everyone began to sound like Mumford, it was too late.”

Riley Ann’s presence in the Boulder music scene is remarkable. Not only has she founded the Coalition of Women Songwriters organization, where she’s connecting female musicians with jam and performance opportunities, empowering them to tour, write, and negotiate a living wage for their art. She also volunteers with Girls Rock Denver, a nonprofit camp that helps teen girls find their voice and form bands and collaborations. Riley Ann has proven herself throughout the past year to be a musician dedicated to building up the community around her.

“I don’t want to nickel and dime this album, I want to do it right,” she says. “And using crowdfunding is the way for me to expedite this whole process and get these songs out into the world as soon as possible.”

Riley Ann’s Kickstarter campaign ends in just a few days, so make sure to give it a view to see her rewards and show support. Donating to a local artist means you’re donating to the Colorado music scene! More about Riley Ann and her music can be found on her website.

-Claire

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

CROMA Festival Celebrates 7th Year Next Week of Bringing Old-Time Music to the Rocky Mountains

By: Riley Ann

In 2010, three individuals were determined to initiate the only Old-Time music festival in a 1,000-mile radius, and they’ve been doing it ever since. This July will be the 7th annual Central Rockies Old-Time Music Association (CROMA) festival in Berthoud, CO from July 6th-10th. The festival features a variety of performers from across North America, including Foghorn Stringband (self-identified as “Ass Kickin’ Redneck Stringband Music”), Erynn Marshall & Carl Jones, the Red Squirrel Chasers, the Bootlickers, Spencer and Rains, and Vesta Johnson accompanied by her grandson, Steve Hall. The festival also hosts a variety of workshops, including an introduction to flatfoot dancing, how to “call” Old-Time dances, instrument and regional tune showcases, and varying levels of instrument instruction, like clawhammer banjo and fiddle bowing styles. See the full schedule of the festival here.

Foghorn String Band.

Foghorn String Band.

One of the most anticipated parts of the CROMA festival are the barn dances, which are held Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights. Attendees can look forward to instruction of each dance prior to songs starting, in addition to having a caller “call” or announce (and even sometimes sing) each move of the dance to the crowd. Dances vary from squares to full-group circles and reels (lines).

“It’s the opportunity to bring people together to share and celebrate Old-Time music,” said Bob Zuellig, one of the founding members of CROMA. The festival has gained national attention and draws people from across the country, which is in alignment with the non-profit’s mission: to preserve and present Old-Time music. “Personally, I have formed some awesome friendships with folks from other parts of the country that otherwise wouldn’t have come together,” he said.

The Bootlickers.

The Bootlickers.

Despite the feel-good atmosphere and growing success of the festival, it doesn’t come without its challenges. “Honestly, we had absolutely no idea what the heck we were getting ourselves into - how much work it would take, if anyone would show up, if it would stick... Today there are six of us who continue do most of the heavy lifting in organizing, and planning is pretty much year-round for a few of us,” Zuellig said, “The hardest part is we are unable to completely support the festival solely through ticket sales and [so we] rely on donations and fundraising for over a third of our budget. We have some awesome sponsors that have been with us since the beginning, and we couldn’t do it without them.”

Watch a video from a CROMA festival goer:

Tickets are still available for the festival next week, and range from $20-$125 depending on what portions of the festival you want to access. Children 15 and under are free to attend, and seniors are eligible for a discount. Purchase your tickets here! Individuals and bands may sign up for the newsletter, and businesses can learn more about membership benefits, including advertising, right here. I will be bringing you festival coverage on CROMA next week, so stay tuned!

-Riley

Find out more about me on my blog.

All photos per CROMA and the artists featured. This article was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Getting Backstage: What It's Like to Volunteer for a Music Festival

Sunset at Telluride Bluegrass Festival 2016.

Sunset at Telluride Bluegrass Festival 2016.

Aside from performing, my favorite way to experience live music is behind the scenes. You’ve seen those people: slapping wristbands down the cattle lines at the Fox and Boulder theatres, standing cross-armed at festival gates, running cables across the stage. More often than not, those individuals aren’t being paid to be there, especially in festival settings. So what’s the glory in all of this? Much more than meets the eye. Despite many of the volunteer jobs being menial labor and requiring long periods of standing in one place (or, worse yet, running gear through throngs of leisurely festival-goers), there are definite perks to the job.

Emmylou Harris.

Emmylou Harris.

Admittedly, my initial interest in volunteering at festivals was fairly self-serving: I’m broke, and I get to see really incredible music for free. However, my experiences as a volunteer have offered me so much more than just a free pass.

Lil' Smokies.

Lil' Smokies.

Last weekend was the second year I volunteered for the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. The festival is internationally recognized as a staple bluegrass festival, and yet part of what I love about it is that it’s not exclusively bluegrass. As a volunteer for the Nightgrass staff, I got into the festival for free (and early) and free camping (collectively a $340 value). Aside from that, I got a staff wristband giving me access to backstage and a meal card to get one free meal backstage per day. Altogether, this is approximately a $500 value to volunteer for five hours each night, which is a pretty sweet deal.

Punch Brothers.

Punch Brothers.

The five-hour shifts can be pretty lighthearted (generally really good people are drawn to volunteer positions), but they can also be brutal. You might have to deal with a belligerent drunk guy claiming he ordered a ticket in advance with no record of it; meanwhile his girlfriend has already slipped past security (a theoretical situation, of course… ). Or you might have to be the responsible adult telling people old enough to be your parents that, no, they can’t bring in their own alcohol (yeah, it’s awkward). Or worse yet, you might have to supervise a backstage door, in a dark hallway where nobody walks and you have to resist falling asleep at 2 AM after having been in the sun all day festivaling. As a volunteer, your position still requires the integrity to show up on time and do your job (and sometimes deal with people who bring out the worst parts of your humanity). With all this, you’re probably questioning if it’s really worth it. For me, absolutely.

Houndmouth.

Houndmouth.

The best part of volunteering is being part of this team, this community that puts on such an immense ordeal. Backstage, I walked past some of my musical idols (making an effort to be casual and contain the inner fangirl, ecstatic to be walking right behind Chris Thile). I ate in the same tent as the Stringdusters as if we were colleagues. I stepped out of a Porta Potti and told the fiddler from Mandolin Orange that I really liked their set as she was stepping in the one next to me. I sat in the VIP section for nearly every show on the main stage, including the front row for Ryan Adams and Emmylou Harris, and I sat alongside the artists’ friends and family members (and sometimes the artists themselves), watching country legends like John Prine and emerging pop stars like Houndmouth and The Oh Hellos. I was part of it all.

Emily Frantz of Mandolin Orange.

Emily Frantz of Mandolin Orange.

If you’re interested in volunteering, do it, but only if it’s because you want to be part of the team. It’s gratifying to be a part of something so immense; something far more valuable than merely a free ticket. A lot of venues and festivals depend on volunteers and unpaid interns for success, so look into the events that interest you, research what volunteer positions are available, and figure out how to apply. It’s an incredible experience for those with their heart in it, and it will always be the second best way to experience live music for me.

Sara Watkins singing with John Prine.

Sara Watkins singing with John Prine.

Learn more about the Telluride Bluegrass Festival here.

-Riley

Find out more about me on my blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See Memorial Day Weekend

By: Hannah Oreskovich

If you’re not at the ‘Squatch, you should probably be at these spots:

Today (Friday 05/27):

Natural Motives and Intergalactic Peace Jelly at Boulder House in Boulder 9PM-Close

Boulder House has recently been booking live music, and for a venue that was formerly known for only booking DJs (Absinthe House), this place has the possibility to bring a refreshing jolt to the local scene. Tonight’s lineup at the House will really get you movin’! Local jam/funk band Natural Motives is joining forces with Boulder’s Intergalactic Peace Jelly, an improv rock band, for a night of experimental and groovin’ sounds. Catch their sets; show starts at 9PM.

Check out Natural Motives’ latest release “Stress Less”:

Jus Sayin at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub in Boulder 10PM-Close

Jus Sayin.

Jus Sayin.

Funk neo-soul outfit Jus Sayin are holding down the stage at Conor’s tonight for the holiday weekend! Fronted by Boulder’s own Dechen Hawk, the five-piece boasts a solid lineup of accomplished musicians who are prepared to help you get down on the dance floor this evening. Roll over to Pearl and check these guys out!

Listen to Jus Sayin’s live version of their tune “Questions”:

Tomorrow (Saturday 05/28):

Denver Day of Rock at the 16th Street Mall in Denver 230PM-Close

King Cardinal.

King Cardinal.

Amp the Cause is throwing a free one-day music festival on the 16th Street Mall tomorrow! There will be food trucks, a beer garden, and 25 bands sprinkling performances across five outdoor stages. Dearling, Gipsy Moon, HONEYHONEY, King Cardinal, and The Burroughs are on the list of our acts to see at the fest, and you can view the whole lineup here. Stop by and dance around! (PS: Peep our exclusive chat with King Cardinal and our recent review of The Burroughs’ new singles.)

Read more about Denver Day of Rock and how Amp the Cause gives back.

Slow Caves Desert Minded EP Release Show at Downtown Artery in Fort Collins 8PM-Close

Slow Caves.

Slow Caves.

Just this week, we dropped a review on Slow Caves’ new Desert Minded EP. We dig the band’s surfer rock vibes, and we have a feeling you will too. Tomorrow night, the group will be shreddin’ for you live in their hometown at Downtown Artery. They’ll have physical copies of their new release ready for you, and they’ll be playing the tunes live. Get ready to stage dive! This is gonna be a fun one.

Read our review of Slow Caves’ Desert Minded EP.

Card Catalog featuring Georges Octobous at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

Card Catalog.

Card Catalog.

There’s a new bluesy folk act on the scene and tonight is their debut performance at The No Name Bar. Card Catalog is a recently formed four-piece comprised of Jenn Tatro (vocals/guitar), Dalton Clayton (lead guitar/bass), Rob Spears (bass/guitar/synth/drums/backup vocals), and Ricky Brewer (drums/bass/guitar/backup vocals). Each musician packs their own punch, which is why this new project is totally worth checking out live! Plus they’ve got a special guest on the lineup, George Octobous. Get yourself a seat behind the big brown door tomorrow night! We’ll see you there.

All Weekend

Boulder Creekfest at the Boulder Creek in Boulder - Various Times and Stages

shimg17045.jpg

Eats, music, and brews! That’s how we want to spend our Memorial Day Weekend. And lucky for us, it’s time for Boulder’s annual Creekfest! There is a slew of local talent on the lineup, including: The Alcapones, Analog Sun with Special Guests, Augustus,The Delta Sonics, Farmer Sisters, Gasoline Lollipops, Let the Beat Speak, Monocle Band, Riley Ann, Whiskey Autumn, and more! Grab your raincoat and head out peeps. See you from the Ferris wheel!

Get Creekfest’s full schedule for the weekend here.

Cheers to the holiday weekend!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured.

BolderBeat's Tiny Desk Contest Compilation + This Weekend's Shows to See

By: Hannah Oreskovich

You entered. We watched (and listened).

Hey Colorado! A lot of local acts have been working on something awesome the past couple of weeks- their submissions to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest! As you probably know, NPR has a sweet feature called Tiny Desk, the brainchild of Bob Boilen, who is also the creator of All Songs Considered. Boilen essentially invites artists to play at his desk and their intimate performances are recorded live; often they’re really badass. Check out some of the most recent Tiny Desk performances here.

Last year, NPR started the Tiny Desk Contest, allowing any and every US artist to have a shot at getting an invite to play Boilen’s sought-after desk. The winner was Fantastic Negrito, who you can check out here. This year, the winner will play the Tiny Desk and also appear in a taping of NPR’s Ask Me Another and tour the US with NPR and Lagunitas. We kept seeing so many local band’s submissions pop up that we decided to throw them all in a feature for your viewing pleasure. We were impressed by everyone’s submissions and we're sure you will be too. So give these vids some traffic yo:

Asalott

Pretty sweet collection, eh?

PS: We couldn’t totally forgo our weekend picks, so here are some shows with their event links to check out the next two nights:

Tonight (Friday, 02/05):

Ancient Elk, The Velveteers, and The Savage Blush at Syntax Opera House in Denver

Hunter Stone at Taco Junky in Boulder

Many Mountains with Still Cellars Distillery and Arthouse in Longmont

Whiskey Autumn and Shiny Shoes First Funk Friday at The Bohemian Biergarten in Boulder

Tomorrow (Saturday, 02/06):

Andrew Sturtz at The Infinite Monkey Theorem in Denver

Griz with Special Guests at Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom in Denver

Imaginary Pointsmontropo, Glimjack, and Shuad’Dib at The Forge in Boulder

Na’an Stop with Policulture and Realtalk at The Fox Theatre in Boulder

Sam Hozdulick’ Album Release Party with Special Guests at Lost Lake in Denver

Both Nights:

Opening Music Weekend at Cafe Aion featuring Paul Kimbiris and Foxfeather

And don’t forget to tune in Sunday for our partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions! We will feature Na’an Stop’s “Win a Bagel” in honor of their headlining performance at The Fox this Saturday. Crank your dials to 95.5FM in Boulder Sunday night between 9-10PM, or stream Green Light here. Listen for local!

Thanks for keeping us afloat as we continue to support local music. If you dig what we’re doing, please give us a like on Facebook (especially from your band page so we can keep up with all you do).

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.