Templo's New 'Mountains Can’t Cry' Features Naturescape Vibes, Reggae Beats & More

By: Mirna Tufekcic

Agreeing to review Templo’s newest EP Mountains Can’t Cry was a bit of a stretch for me; a test to see if I could get down with dub. Generally, I do not subject my ears to dubstep of any kind, but I made an exception this time out of pure curiosity, and to give the genre another chance because this EP was presented to me as an “ethnic dub album.” I like CloZee and I really like Beats Antique, Bonobo, Ott, and Dynohunter, none of whom are dub, but all of whom definitely know how to throw down some gooey good ethnic sounds. So here I was with Templo, and it did not disappoint!  

Though Mountains Can’t Cry certainly falls into the dubstep category, it is subtle, and filters through the ears without leaving you feeling like you just lost brain cells huffing glue, which is how most of the genre has left me feeling before. At the forefront of each of the six songs are naturescape vibes, reggae beats, and the aforementioned “ethnic” sounds.

The first two tracks on the EP have a Middle Eastern flare. “Magnetics,” has a more up-beat, daytime feel and “The Owl Watches,” turns a little darker and is seductive, with calls from night creatures accompanied by mesmerizing sounds resembling far-east wind instruments and maybe even a bit of Balkan folk. 

Templo.

Templo.

The third track, “Shot in the Dark,” is probably the most traditionally “dubby” track on the EP, with heavy reggae beats and a lot of record scratching. Not long after that, the fourth track reawakens the spirit with a playfulness reminiscent of video games from the early 2000s, and mixes in what sounds like Native American or African tribal chants. “They Gone,” the next to last track on Mountains Can’t Cry, is heavy with reggae vibes. The final track on the album, “RedShotScandal,” incorporates a lot of everything heard in the previous five tracks, but like a fireworks finale, it creates a loud explosion of light and sound only to fade into silence, smoke and gratification at the end. 

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Mountains Can’t Cry is built like a journey through naturescapes. It’s an easy and enjoyable listen that doesn’t even take thirty minutes to complete, and even as someone who wasn’t a fan before, I am confident you’ll like it whether you’re winding down the summer, or catching Templo live on tour this fall. 

Keep up with Templo here.

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Jesse Rutherford Holds His Own on Recent Solo Tour Without The Neighbourhood

By: Taylor Naiman

Monday night, avid Neighbourhood fans were given a real treat to see Jesse Rutherford on his first solo tour at the Bluebird Theatre. Earlier this year when Rutherford announced his solo tour, many fans assumed this would mean the demise of the band entirely. As a band who has experienced huge success over the years, this seemed a little worrisome. Fortunately for fans like me, the band is headed on the road again for their own tour and jamming at various music festivals this summer. Until then though, Rutherford’s solo tour is a special treat. Fans on Monday got to hear the grooves from his solo albums “&” and “Garageb&”. Rutherford has accumulated a substantial and loyal fan-base over the years and since it has been a little over a year since The Neighbourhood played a show in Denver, everyone at the Bluebird this week was hyped to see him take that stage. We even got a sprinkle of The Neighbourhood when he performed “#icanteven”.

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Genre-blending is characteristic of The Neighbourhood’s music, and also of Rutherford’s own solo sound as well. He combines hip-hop, edgy pop undertones mixed with atmospheric beats, and a sultry voice. Monday’s show was comprised of both slow tunes and funky beats we could dance to. This show was different than the others I’ve seen involving Rutherford; a dichotomy which offered a new way to see him in his element. Same man, same voice, yet he offered a different mood. The beauty of the Bluebird too is the absence of any barricade separating the artist(s) from the audience, creating a true concert intimacy. This offered the opportunity for an energetic interaction, whether it was Rutherford shaking hands with concert-goers or some of the crowd feeling personally serenaded. The set embodied both a dance party and chill vibes all in one.

A strong stage presence and audience participation encouragement is essential from any lead singer and for Rutherford, this mean singing “Rock & Roll DJ” together. Rutherford always manages to show how much fun he is having and graces the stage with a necessary character and captivating charisma. He never takes a stationary approach to any of his performances; he moves around constantly with a rhythm concert-goers can not deny. Looking around the room, everyone knew the lyrics, snapped their fingers, and continued to dance. Between songs, girls were in the crowd shouting “Daddy!” and “I love you!”. You could say Rutherford is popular with the Denver ladies.

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Having attended past Neighbourhood shows in Denver, Monday’s show not only felt more intimate; it also felt minimalistic compared to the rest. It had a raw quality, both in regard to Rutherford’s attire and the overall ambience. Over the years, the frontman is always changing his look, whether with his hair color, his choice in leather jackets versus fur jackets, or his affinity for skinny jeans. On Monday he sported a simple white t-shirt and blue Dickies pants; his set was made up of only him and his DJ and a short collaboration with his opener, Goody Grace.

A major highlight from this Denver show was Rutherford sitting down in front of the microphone without his DJ, just him and his acoustic guitar, singing to his fans. Some people would have considered this tour a risk, but with great risk, comes great reward. This solo tour gave Rutherford the opportunity to spread his wings in an avenue of individual sound. This was his show and we were all here for it. We cannot wait to see what the future holds for Jesse and The Neighbourhood.

-Taylor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.


Denver's Underground Music Showcase Announced Their Entire Lineup Today

Denver’s favorite music event of the summer is back for 2019! Get all of the details:

Who: The Underground Music Showcase (UMS), Denver’s largest and most iconic music festival, just announced the full 2019 lineup and will once again bring an array of acclaimed national and local artists, creatively curated stages, and host endless surprises across the three-day showcase.

From Friday, July 26 through Sunday, July 28, the 19th annual Underground Music Showcase will return to the historic and hip Broadway corridor just south of downtown Denver.

What:  The just announced 2019 UMS lineup, with performances by more than 200 artists, includes national headliners Honne, Chicano Batman, Black Mountain, Tuxedo, Earthgang, and Still Woozy.

Supporting artists include Empress Of, Yves Tumor, DRAMA, Sophie Meiers, LEIKELI47, Y La Bamba, Gardens & Villa, William Elliott Whitmore, Miya Folick, Tessa Violet, Haviah Mighty, Liza Anne, Spooky Mansion, Greyhounds, Dressy Bessy, DBUK, SWSH, Kainalu, Jackie Mendoza, Clavvs, Rapperchicks, Rich Jones, Divino Niño, Parallelephants, Deezie Brown, Garrett T Capps and more and more than 200 acts from across Colorado. View the full lineup here.

When: Friday, July 26 – Sunday, July 28

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“UMS is a strong representation of all types of music. This year’s lineup of national and local bands was strategically designed to showcase the volume of musically talented individuals Denver has grown while also inviting some national acts to crash the party. Denver’s music scene is growing and shaping into something special, something worth putting Denver on the map as a nationally recognized ‘music city.’ We have put our heart and soul into ensuring UMS helps grow that positive image for all Denver artists while keeping the soul of this underground music community alive.”

— TOBIAS KRAUSE, EVENT DIRECTOR OF UNDERGROUND MUSIC SHOWCASE

Photo Credit:   Nikki Rae Photography

Photo Credit: Nikki Rae Photography

Where: The Underground Music Showcase takes place in a multitude of venues along Broadway, in Denver, Colorado. More details on specific stages and locations will be announced closer to the festival.

Three-day weekend tickets are now available for $50. The three-day weekend tickets include general admission access to all musical performances and all stages, all weekend long. To purchase tickets, please visit: https://www.undergroundmusicshowcase.com/tickets.

Why: Denver is on its way to becoming a globally recognized music city with locally organized festivals like UMS leading the shift towards more immersive, live music events. UMS is the perfect representation of the vastness of incredibly talented artists from in and around the Denver metro area, showcasing the city’s growing music scene.

Two Parts purchased UMS from The Denver Post Community Foundation in January 2018. Since taking over the festival, Two Parts has worked to expand the number of outdoor stages and experiences and to continue building on the success of the past 18 years.

Grab your presales here!

Sabroso Music Festival Had Eats, Lucha Libre, The Offspring, & the Best Gringo Bandito Hot Sauce in All the Land

By: Taylor Naiman

After its inaugural year in 2018, the one-day Sabroso Craft Taco, Beer, and Music Festival made a return to Fiddler’s Green Amphitheater last Sunday. Whether the crowd saw Nerf from 93.3 KTCL dressed as a taco or witnessed a record-holding competitive eater Takeru Kobayashi scarf down a bunch of tacos in one-minute, there was no shortage of enjoyment. Music, tacos, and craft beer: what is better than this trifecta? Well it did get even better than that. How? One word: luchadores. But more on that later.

Sabroso’s festival was a spicy taco lover’s delight. There were rows of taco trucks with plenty of food to salivate over and a wide range of flavors to choose from. Sponsored by Gringo Bandito, the brainchild of Dexter Holland, lead singer of The Offspring, there was hot sauce on every table in sight whether mild or extra hot. Holland has established a name for himself outside of the music industry and continues to expand his horizons. The Gringo Bandito Super Hot sauce was the perfect addition to my tacos and chips throughout the festival- it gave everything that nice kick I was looking for. As a devout hot sauce lover, it’s something I would put on my chicken, fries, eggs, and definitely on wings. Over the course of the day, some of my other favorite foodie noms included the shrimp taco from the Denver Taco Truck; the green chile chicken tacos, which the menu described as chicken braised in hatched green chile, smoked jalapeno crema, onions, cheese, and cilantro (call my tastebuds now); and the “Pig Sty” tater tots from the Colorado Pig Rig which were smothered in green chile, cheese, onions, cilantro, and jalapeno.

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As a part of the ticket price, festival-goers were able to go from booth to booth and partake in beer tasting from noon to 4PM too. Besides the definite local favorites (i.e. Ratio and Odell), brews that stood out included Rhapsody from Meridian Hive and the Pome Mel from the Colorado Cider Company. Being in the 70-degree weather, both of these hit the spot as refreshing and sweet. The Rhapsody was enriched with blackberry and honey notes and the Pome Mel boasted notes of “Colorado wildflower honey and granny smith apples, with hints of rosemary & lavender”. Though not your typical brews, these evened out the spiciness of the tacos with a perfect little sweetness.

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With food and drink out of the way, let’s get to the action! Los luchadores! Originating in Mexico and characterized by colorful, ornate masks, Lucha libre professional wrestling has its own particular vibe and flavor. It was a major highlight of the festival and there were people of all ages enjoying the comedy and the animation happening inside of that ring. Each of the luchadors had a character to play, and the audience had a favorite that they cheered on.

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At one point, an onlooker decided to step into the ring (hold my beer!), and the luchador slapped the wanderer’s glasses off of his face, thinking he was a part of the show. (Rather hilariously, he was not.) For the fourth and final match, we were treated to a very special guest, the famous luchador, Cesar Gonzalez, a.k.a. Ramses. For those of you who do not know who he is, watch Nacho Libre! This villainous star gained notoriety from Jack Black’s 2006 comedy and women in the audience were definitely shouting “Sexy Pants!” at him. A lucky few were even given the opportunity for a photo with Ramses in the ring. Following the matches, people were allowed to buy their own professional masks, with prices ranging from $20 to $60 each. Each mask was modeled after Lucha libre’s best wrestlers and yes, there was even a Nacho Libre mask. If all of this ruckus sounds like your kind of get down, make sure to catch a Lucha libre match at the Livestock Arena in Jefferson County (Ramses unfortunately not included).

Black Flag.

Black Flag.

Of course, Sabroso had to sprinkle in some good music somewhere too. With a stacked lineup including The Dendrites, Dwarves, Strung Out, Black Flag, The Vandals, Bad Religion, and The Offspring, there was no shortage of entertainment at the festival. Even though the beautiful weather was replaced with a downpour of rain and 40-degree weather by the end of the night, it was all worth it. During The Offspring’s set, many concert-goers had to mosh or jump around to keep warm. The cold was chilling to the bone but the ones who had stayed and braved it got to hear some of The Offspring’s best songs including “Self-Esteem,” “Gone Away,” You’re Gonna Go Far, Kid,” and “Pretty Fly (For A White Guy).” Here’s to hoping there will be many Sabroso Festivals to come!

-Taylor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.









Youssoupha Sidibe & Ok2Change Prove Your Heart Is Where It's At in Hilo, Hawai'i

By: Moriel O'Connor

Hilo is a city like no other. It's chill. Most people stroll around in no type of hurry. It’s vibrant. The downtown blocks are filled with tropical street art and rusted red roofs. On the weekends, the neon lights shine as music rings with the rain. Last Saturday, there was a flash flood warning and noone was phased. I was out watching the clouds drizzle into ripples on the asphalt.

Why did I cross the road? To get from the kava bar to the tea room. Walking into Perfect Harmony, I saw tall golden walls, red beams and circles of friends. Auntie Nancy, a wise woman with 14 children, poured tea into my cup as we listened to Ok2Change play live.

Ok2Change.

Ok2Change.

Ok2Change is a three piece folk-hop band based out of Pahoa, Hawai’i.  Lead vocalist, Imani Gentry-Faust has a soulfully sublime sound that is electrifying and unforgettable. Jay Lara also shares his voice, supporting the story of each song. He plays the guitar because what is a folk band without an acoustic guitar? Completing the trio is Matthew Jordan, a humble vocal percussionist who makes more sounds with his mouth than a drum kit ever could.

They share their songs to inspire others and are constantly reminding us it’s okay to change. Playing anywhere from farmer’s markets to museums, OK2Change is well known in Hawai'i. They also visit the mainland to support acts such as Boulder-based Amber Lily and Tubby Love.

Youssoupha Sidibe.

Youssoupha Sidibe.

After the tea party, the music went on down the road at Hilo Shala.  International Kora (African Harp) player, Youssoupha Sidibe, came to town to share his message. He believes music is the most intimate thing we can share, and he orchestrates musical intimacy with each crowd he meets. Youssoupha encouraged everyone to open their hearts and sing along to his Senegalese chants as he played the kora. In between songs, he spoke of unity and love. I wrote down some of his wisdom to share:

“We all gon’ get together and sing together. That is our salvation.”

“We sing to be in tune with the universe. Sound is the best portal to take you there.”

“A house is nothing but some bricks, maybe some wood. You not gon’ take it with you. Share what you have.”

“Your heart. That’s where it’s at.”

He’s right. Your heart is where it’s at. The evening was a reminder to stay true to love, and to take time to sip tea and sing in unison. It can get plush inside of our boxes: walls up, doors locked, windows shut and all. Still, we all have to get out of bed and do something. When we choose to circle together, we are the change.

Listen to Youssoupha's music here to tune into the love. You can listen to Ok2Change on Spotify or find them at Project Earth this summer.

-Moriel

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Boulder-Based Nobide Are Making Waves One Big Stage at a Time

By: Natalie Pulvino

Boulder-based live electronic band Nobide is fresh off a show at the Boulder Theater, soon to headline the Larimer Lounge, and has a lot in store for this summer’s festival season. We sat down with Nick Vann, founder of Nobide, to ask him about the band’s authentic sound, local influences, and upcoming endeavors.   

What differentiates Nobide from other live-electronic acts?

Probably our versatility- we want to make all types of music, not get caught in one sound or genre. We’ve been working on combining the production elements with the live instruments, figuring out how to allow the produced pieces to function like a band member. Our live setup is pretty crazy- I can now manipulate and change the sound of the guys as they’re playing [and] do DJ production effects live which is pretty crazy.

You’ve described Nobide to BolderBeat previously as “organic-electronica,” emphasizing the live aspect to your music. What is your process for infusing the produced pieces with the organic element to create the perfect blend?

Our process is evolving as we figure out our sound. We’re still fresh as a unit, so we’re not sticking to any one process for writing or playing- it’s all very open right now. As far as putting songs together it’s really important to me that the songs don’t come out sounding like just another band. There’s so much possibility with production and sound… I’m always looking to hear something new, both musically and in regards to how a piece actually sounds.

Are there any local live-electronic acts that you draw inspiration from?

Mxxnwatchers is making some really forward thinking stuff, as is Evanoff. Break Science are the OGs. I think we all feed off each other, but we’re all sorta doing our own thing and pushing it as far it can go. To me that’s the ideal- there doesn’t seem to be much of a point in making stuff that sounds too much like someone else.

How do you cultivate that influence while maintaining a strong sense of authenticity in your music?

I think seeing how other people approach their music is the best kind of inspiration. We try not to take what other people are actually doing musically or sonically into account and just focus on doing what sounds best to us. In that sense we have no choice but to be authentic.

Nobide recently opened for The Floozies at the Boulder Theater- what was that like for the band?

It was a huge moment for all of us. I grew up in Boulder, so it was especially exciting for me. It was so killin’ to play for the hometown crew and have them show up like that. Nobide is Boulder-bred, and I think it was cool for the Boulderites to see the evolution of the project. A lot of people got introduced to the music that night too which was exciting. We’ve got mad love for Boulder.

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Are there any shows you guys have played that have been super memorable?

The Boulder Theater show was one for sure, as well as The Fiillmore when we opened for Sunsquabi in January. It’s always exciting to play big rooms with big sound systems. We played with Michal Menert in January and that was a full-circle moment. I’ve been listening to his music for years.

Nobide is on the bill for Summer Camp Music Festival, Sonic Bloom, and a few others that will be announced soon. What is the band looking forward to most about being on the lineup for these festivals?

I think mostly meeting new people- artists and fans alike. It’ll be cool to see how our music stands up and translates in new environments. It’s a big opportunity, but it’s also just gonna be fun as heck.

Do you foresee any challenges that may arise from playing festivals as opposed to singular shows?

It’s definitely going to be a compromise on some fronts [since] we have a pretty complex setup for performing, but it’s nothing we can’t handle. It’ll be a good challenge to be pros, to know it’s not all about us but more about the vibe of the whole event.

There’s been talk that the band may be hitting the road soon. If you guys go on tour, where would you want to play and who would you love to play with?

Eventually all over the world! But for now we’re trying to get down South and out to the West Coast and Midwest, start slowly expanding our radius through the U.S. We’d love to play with all sorts of people that like to get down. Lettuce, Pretty Lights, Zhu, Rufus Du Sol, Bonobo, Odesza… We want to bring this music all over!

Keep up with Nobide here and don’t miss their headlining show at the Larimer Lounge this Saturday, April 6th. Tickets & information here.  

-Natalie

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Elektric Animals' "Vulnerable Thing" Digs Deep

By: Sam Piscitelli

There’s always been some sort of heaviness that accompanies the Rock genre; a pressure to make as much noise as possible. The tricky part is keeping the music grounded in the roots of its composition and lyrics. A lot of the time, the story of the song can become muddled in the making of it and what the band itself is trying to convey. Luckily, for Elektric Animals their song “Vulnerable Thing” not only deserves recognition, but shines a light on the future of what alternative rock can be, if only fought for with a little persistence and love for the craft. The Denver trio, comprised of Nick Sanders (vocals), Oscar Jara (guitar), and Jerrid Van Scoy (bass) recently formed and today, we’re proud to premiere their newest single:

“Vulnerable Thing” digs deep into the message that in life, you have a tendency to carry the past into the present. It can be both a force of positivity, or of negativity. Whether it’s the scars you’ve endured or the happiness you wish to see fulfilled, life can either make you or break the person you are destined to become. Elektric Animals decided to pour their souls about this aspect of life into this track. This band is fearless, yet honest, which reminds us that music is a treasure, not just a glimmer you can shove on a shelf somewhere.

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The music industry at times seems to settle for uninspired music; music that only garners in split seconds of attention. Elektric Animals seem to be the opposite, creating music that involves fleeting moments and engraving them more permanently inside our heads. Not many bands or artists can take fleeting moments and engrave them like this, but this is a band who does so knowing that the only attention they crave is from the real stories they lead.

Keep up with Elektric Animals here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Jr. Rabbit Talks Band Dynamics, Influences, & What Music Means to Them

By: Natalie Pulvino

Amidst some of the most notable jam bands and the thriving live-electronic scene, Denver is exploding with a number of up-and coming indie-rock bands. This week, we sat down with Jr. Rabbit, a four-piece project with a laid-back attitude but a serious vision. Singer-songwriter and guitarist Ryan Howell talked to us about the band’s formation, their new singles, and what rehearsals can look like. Read on:

Tell us a bit about Jr. Rabbit. How many people are in the band and who plays what?

I’m [Ryan] on guitar, and I lyrically write most of the music. Shayne MacLaughlin plays lead guitar and drums, Stephen (Eski) Edwards plays bass guitar, and Tyler Moyer plays the drums.

How did you all meet and form Jr. Rabbit?

It mainly started with Tyler and I last year jamming and writing originals, and [we] took it from there. It’s sort of an open project- we let a lot of people in on the recording process. Another cool fact is that me, Tyler, and Shayne are all from the East Coast and all met up around 2012 when I was in Colorado on tour with a different band. Three years later, I moved out here to start my own thing and it sort of went from there.

How would you describe your music?

Musically we try to work on dynamics- most of our songs are three to four chords. Personally, I try to just write things that are relatable. I try to relate to the inner-emotion of the person in our songs.

What inspired the name Jr. Rabbit?

Honestly, there’s not a cool story, I wish there was. I was driving one day and that phrase just popped up in my brain and I thought it flowed nicely, and it was just something that stuck in my head.

Who are your main influencers?

I vocally reflect off Deer Tick and definitely Modest Mouse. We also gain a lot of influence from Classic Rock, which is instilled into all of us… that’s what we grew up listening to with our folks. But we all have different backgrounds. Eski grew up on AC/DC and Tyler and I grew up on Funk.

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What excites you guys about the two singles you’ve released, “Situation” and “Rain to Wine?”

We’re getting good overall- we’re not just trying to make it a catchy song lyrically, we’re trying to make it something that other people can relate to but maybe are afraid to express. “Rain to Wine” is about addiction, and I’ve struggled, and I know friends who have struggled. Songs like that make it okay for other people to talk about that problem, and if not at least it’s a sigh of release for someone who’s going through the same thing. That’s sort of why I got into music- I felt like someone else was writing what I was feeling and it made me feel less alone.

What has been your biggest challenge since working together as a band and how did you overcome it?

Showing up on time. Shayne is always on “Shayne Time,” as we call it. But other than that the challenge is trying to believe in what we’re trying to do and hoping to see that catch on. We’re not doing covers; we’re mainly originals, so the biggest frustration is for people to get on board with our originals.

What are your band rehearsals typically like?

It’s mainly a little bit of everything. At first we usually just start jamming, whether it be a cover song or just improv. We do at least one improv jam per show to just create something in that moment. Then we’ll typically go through our new stuff and end off on the stuff we all know to make sure it’s polished and sharp.

Where has Jr. Rabbit played recently, and which venues are in the books?

We’ve been playing at this place called Maddie's Biergarten in Castle Rock. They’ve got the full setup with a stage and soundboard, and they gave us residency there for all of March. We’ll be in Denver and Fort Collins in June.

Where would you guys like to be with your music career in 2020?

Hopefully in a place where we’re making a living off of it, wherever that may be. I want to be playing for anyone who wants to listen to real, genuine, authentic music. But we’ll see, everything takes time.

Keep up with Jr. Rabbit here.

-Natalie

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Prep Rally's 'Head Rush' Is Full of Synthy Experiments & Light, Luscious Vocals

By: Julia Talen

Electronic indie pop duo Prep Rally will release their inspired sophomore EP Head Rush this April, full of vulnerable themes paired with instrumentalist Drew Norris’s catchy beats and vocalist Tatum Russo’s delicate voice.

The first track “Phoenix” kicks-off the EP slowly, with a soft, easy melody. It’s joined by Russo’s enthralling vocal harmonies, crooning lyrics indicative of the transformative and inquisitive questions sewn into this record like “will be born again” and “transcending from who I once was”. As the track progresses, Norris’ instrumentals build in complexity and the tempo ascends and shifts, lifting listeners into the tenacious and seemingly effortless layers of this record.

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“Roll With The Punches,” the second track, begins with an addicting piano beat evoking a throwback vibe. Similar to many of Prep Rally’s tunes, this song builds and expands. There is a nice bridge in this track with a round of voices singing lyrics like “roll with the punches” and “everyday is a rematch,” followed by what Norris calls a “sparkly arpeggio outro” which is mesmerizing. The band’s single, “Break In,” released at the beginning of the year, succeeds this tune and remains to be one of my favorite tracks on the record.

Another noteworthy tune off this EP has to be “Mean Girl,” a noble, feminist exploration into societal pressures on women and how impactful they can be. In considering this track, Russo states, “There is a mean girl in all of us,”  provoked by a society. Lyrics like “whoever gave a damn about what’s inside/and were put up to fight by the shape of our bodies,” parallel this sentiment as does Russo’s echoing vocals on this track which reflect the insidious and obsessive mean girl in our minds. The pop-like nature of the track allows listeners to digest some of the heavier concepts on this record, including dark, societal pressures. The next track, “Cloud Nine,” also explores anxiety and mental health, but through this pop duo’s delicious bops. Prep Rally’s EP overall destigmatizes such subjects.

Prep Rally.

Prep Rally.

The EP comes full circle with “Coffins in the Attic”, a song that explores facets of change and transformation, much like “Phoenix.” The tune is slower, like the first track. I like the risk the duo takes in the middle of the song in which everything breaks for a beat, followed by a breath and the ding of a triangle. Then listeners melt back into the folds of Prep Rally’s piano diddles, synthy experiments, and light, luscious vocals.

“Head Rush” explores heavy, important themes balanced by captivating patches of instrumentals quilted together to create a really nice, cohesive and interesting record. Prep Rally’s EP drops April 2nd. The dynamic duo will host a release party at downtown Denver’s Walnut Room on April 6th.

Keep up with Prep Rally here.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Lightning in a Bottle Releases Incredible Lineup, Offers Much More Than Just Music

By: Benjamin Tillis

Now taking place in Buena Vista Lake in central California, two hours north of Los Angeles, Lightning in a Bottle will host 20,000 attendees from May 8th-13th this year, instead of its typical Memorial Day Weekend dates.

After festival creator DoLab announced a new date, location, and capacity for their “transformative festival,” LIB fans were anxious to see the Phase 1 lineup released February 15th. It is safe to say people were pleased.

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The biggest names on Lightning in a Bottle’s Phase 1 lineup for its Lightning, Woogie, and Thunder stages include Disclosure, who went silent after releasing their last full album, 2015’s Caracal, along with Big Gigantic, Santigold, Lane 8, G Jones, and Polish Ambassador.

This year the festival also seems to appeal to a more indie jazz vibe with musicians like Toro y Moi, Khruangbin, and a much anticipated “3D” set from Flying Lotus topping the lineup.

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There are still two stage lineups that have yet to be announced, Pagoda and The Grand Artique, which bring one of a kind musicians and theatrical acts you won’t see at any other festival.

DoLab does a great job year after year of bringing in unique and up and coming artists, but they also curate a festival with so much more than music. With a focus on sustainability, social cohesion, personal health, and creative expression, there is so much to experience at Lightning in a Bottle, including yoga classes, sound baths, and creative workshops. It truly creates its own culture that encourages you to express yourself however you feel.

For more information on the festival and for tickets, check out LIB’s website.

-Ben

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Dacota Muckey Healed Souls in Hilo, Hawai’i Last Weekend

By: Moriel O’Connor

Some days are spent upon a black sand beach, between cliff sides and riptides, with climbing trees and drum circle beats. Other times, we stay inside. There are rainstorms, and they keep us humble. Some people get lost, but there is still plenty of concrete in the midst of this jungle.

Dacota Muckey.

Dacota Muckey.

Last Saturday night in Hilo there was no rain. Only roses. Roses that were probably grown, then flown from overseas. Maybe marked half off after V-day, then gifted around Hilo Town Tavern in perfect timing, at the heart of Dacota Muckey’s performance. Strong and empowering, his voice brought people in from blocks away.

Dacota sings passionately or not at all. He dwells in some type of “feel it in your bones” vocal range that few can touch. In 2018, Dacota released a record titled This is the Music that Heals Your Soul. With acoustic roots, loop pedal effects, and a tendency to swim through genres and improvise interludes, he creates a profound sound for a solo artist.

Based out of Indianapolis, Dacota has shared stages with acts such as Blues Traveler and Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness and played for music festivals Shangrila and Bonnaroo.  He also plays in midwest jam band, “The Trip.” He lifts spirits on and off the stage, and has a voice that deserves to be heard. Turn up his album to hear for yourself.

-Moriel

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Japanese Band Kikagaku Moyo Delivered a Tightly-Honed Psychedelic Performance at Boulder's Fox Theatre

By: Adam Cabrera

Tuesday night, Kikagaku Moyo performed at Boulder’s own Fox Theater, delivering a performance that ranged from the soft, serenity of acid-folk to the fuzzed drenched, freakouts of heavy psychedelic rock.

Kikagaku Moyo. Photo per the author.

Kikagaku Moyo. Photo per the author.

The Tokyo-based five-piece band, who have been continuing to grow international acclaim, rarely visit North America, and even less frequently make stops in Colorado. So, it wasn’t a surprise to see a theater packed with fans on what would typically be a slow night for most live music venues. All in all, the show was more than expected and turned out to be one of the best I’ve attended over the past year.

Starting out the night was Boulder artist Ashley Koett. What felt like a mix between soul, jazz, and indie bedroom pop, the band brought together a relaxed, laid-back set composed of tasteful bass grooves and catchy guitar melodies, all supported by the pleasant timbre of Ashley’s voice. Following Koett’s crew was WEEED, a psych-rock quintet featuring the uncommon double-drummer setup, along with electric bass, guitar, flute, conga, harmonica, and ambient live-looping. In long, hypnotic jams, the band captivated the audience and got them moving along with the heavily textured percussion and the reverberating daze of guitar solos.

But, as the headliner collected themselves on stage, a noticeable change in energy happened throughout the room. Hair grown well past their shoulders and dressed in clothes which resembled the fashion of the sixties and seventies, Kikagaku Moyo gave off the semblance and character of wandering bohemian mystics with a slew of curious instruments placed upon the stage. The usual cast was present (drums, bass,keyboard, and guitar), but the unusual characters such as the electric sitar (a defining aspect of their sound), and cello also found their place among the band.

Tightly-honed, as well as spaciously free-formed, together they played through the best of their catalog adding unique improvised moments which made watching the performance feel all the more special. It was a pleasure to get to see the band react on the fly, switching from spaced-out meditations tenuously held together by echoing guitar riffs, to introspective and effortlessly catchy pop melodies which quickly received cheers from the crowd once recognized.

In this rare chance to see Kikagaku Moyo, I couldn’t have been more satisfied with their incredible performance, and I was even happier at the end of the night when I stopped at the merch table to picked one of their records on vinyl, as they rarely make their way to U.S. record stores. Surely to be recognized as one of the most notable psychedelic acts of the past decade, it was a pleasure to see Kikagaku Moyo perform.

Keep up with Kikagaku Moyo here.

-Adam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Desert Hearts Creates Love with Late-Night Los Angeles Party

By: Benjamin Tillis

This past Friday night, following Valentine’s Day, Desert Hearts hosted a cupid-friendly event at The Belasco Theater in Downtown Los Angeles, titled Let’s Make Love. Desert Hearts is a music festival and record label located in Southern California. More recently, they host parties like Let’s Make Love and many others around the country. However, to call this event just a party would be a huge understatement.

Let’s Make Love. Photo Credit: Miranda McDonald

Let’s Make Love. Photo Credit: Miranda McDonald

With two stages on two different floors at the historic Belasco Theater, all you had to do was climb up a couple flights of stairs to switch from a music festival DJ set vibe to an underground warehouse party scene. The music was primarily house and techno. On the main stage upstairs, fans gathered with lights and Valentine’s Day-themed decorations to dance to Marbs, Lee Reynolds, and Desert Hearts’ staple Mikey Lion.

Meanwhile, the smaller stage downstairs was hosted by Sublevel, a DJ who also goes by the name Doc Martin. Sublevel played a set following satisfying shows by Aunton Tumas, Mr. Koolaid, and Jeno.

Desert Hearts knows good music, but their biggest draw is the crowd their events appeal to. There is a culture of acceptance, giving, and being yourself, and as a result, you meet people who are happy to be there, decked out in crazy outfits and grooving with new and old friends. It’s an incredible atmosphere that even extends in the common area outside. When you’re tired of dancing, it’s easy to start conversations there with other party goers.

Like most Desert Heart events, the party went until 4 AM, satisfying the dancing needs of all the nocturnal animals of Los Angeles.

Check out DesertHearts.us for more information on parties in your area and the Desert Hearts Festival which takes place April 26th-29th just outside of Los Angeles. You’ll be glad you did!

-Ben

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Strange American's "Till You're Told" Music Video Is Symbolic Of The Musician's Journey

By: Sam Piscitelli

As a musician, whether you’re a solo artist or in a band, there is this acknowledgement that comes with garnering a certain amount of fans or receiving positive praise. It’s as though you are no longer a lone act playing your songs in your bedroom; instead you seem to be a well-known somebody. From there, all seems like it will move upwards rather than careening into a haze of obscurity. But, what people don’t know is the long-haul you’ve placed yourself in; the countless times you  practice your craft, the stomach-turning preparation of every interview or review of you and your art, and the unnerving fear that as quickly as your dreams were made, they can just as easily disappear. In their music video for “Till You’re Told” the Strange Americans symbolically covers the landscape of the music business while also relying on the talent that brought them their success.

The video begins with each band member on their own, forging their individual paths. They all carry one item with them, the items being symbolic of who the band is when they come together. The symbolism in the music video is very subjective, but to me each item plays off one another. For example; the lantern is for the fire the band has inside of themselves, the sticks are the framework of the band, the amp is the way in which they express themselves through music, the shovel is about burying the past, and the suitcase is for the accomplished dreams they wish to carry with them one day. With their now unified front, the Strange Americans then begin to traverse the land together. To me, this shows that while they are further than they’ve ever been before, they’re still on the journey. It’s a music video that reflects upon anyone’s time in the music industry. You can walk for miles with the passions you have, the items you bring along for the ride and create as much as you want, but nothing is certain.

While the symbolism can- and mostly likely will be debated- we can’t ignore how this video catches the heart of the struggling musician. It’s a message that no matter how much you go through from the very beginning till the end of your make or break career, that nothing will be set in stone, especially your reputation “Till You’re Told” otherwise. In a business that is continuously changing, the only thing you can be sure of is the work you put out into the world. Once it’s out there, it represents you and that’s what matters. For a video that has a lot of hidden meanings, it’s untold truth is undeniable.

Keep up with the Strange Americans here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: The Symbols' 'Catching Fire' Is a Solid Funk Blues Mash-up

By: Julia Talen

Fort Collins-based bluesy-soul band The Symbols are out with their sophomore record, Catching Fire, an album infused with front woman Mer Sal’s sultry, Amy Winehouse-esque voice, and her husband Jasco’s funky, rhythmic guitar solos.

In an interview with Westword on Catching Fire, Jasco shared that the album differs from Smile, their first record saying, “I wanted to get a fairly live feel. I didn’t want to do tons of overdubs and soundscaping, things that would make it hard to duplicate live. In some ways, it’s a little bit sparse in terms of vocal harmonies, extra guitar parts and keyboard parts that a band can [get away with] in the studio. But we decided not to do too much of that.”

The Symbols.

The Symbols.

While listening to Catching Fire, I felt like I was close to a stage in the Rocky Mountains swaying in the summer to some of their latest tunes. With the first track “Good For Me,” listeners get a sweet taste of Mer Sal’s incredible vocals paired with bluesy, textured harmonies before hearing more of the breadth and range of her voice in “Let’s Be Love,” the album’s second track.

The title track certainly was one of my favorites, beginning with a sparse drum beat before Sal’s fierce vocals cry lyrics, “Boy you better run/because I’m catching fire.” Jasco shows off his guitar skills (he used to played for Grammy-nominated band Blinddog Smokin’) in this one too, with mesmerizing solos and far-reaching scale.

Other tracks of note are “Shake It,” a total jam dance number sure to energize summer music festival this year with lyrics, “Shake that butt/funk it up/get your groove on.” “Soon” is another favorite of mine. Sal scats through this tune and the mid-century vibe reminds me of jazzy buskers in the French Quarter. The album ends with “Our Song,” an emotional, heart-wrenching ballad that truly reveals the rich power this duo evokes in their music.

Catching Fire is out now and The Symbols are set to tour throughout Colorado and the Midwest this spring with forthcoming shows in Denver, Boulder, Loveland, Fort Collins, and more. They also give back many of their proceeds to charities like Realities for Children and Adoption Dreams Come True. Scope out this magical, funk-meets-rock-meet-blues mash-up’s latest raw and rich project.

Keep up with The Symboles here.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Why Corsicana Are One of Denver's Finest Up & Coming Indie Acts

By: Sam Piscitelli

As I walked into Globe Hall around 10:30PM, I was immediately caught in a sea of people anxiously waiting for Corsicana to take the stage. As I found a spot where I could just barely see the band, I heard different comments about the group from the people around me: “Man this band is really good- thanks for coming with me to check it out!”, “I can’t wait to hear them!” and “This is going to be a great night.” It seemed Corsicana had already garnered a warm and welcomed reputation. As the band finished their soundcheck, the crowd erupted into cheers, whistles and screams. Lead singer, Ben Pisano let the audience know that since it was Perennial’s release party, they were going to play the whole album from start to finish.

As they dove into their latest artistic effort, everyone in the room either fell quiet or let loose. One way or another, they let the music soak over them. You could feel the electricity in the venue. Corsicana took that energy and engaged the audience in an intimate way, making it seem like they (and you) were the only ones standing in the room that night.

Corsicana at Globe Hall. Photo Credit: CODO Productions.

Corsicana at Globe Hall. Photo Credit: CODO Productions.

Corsicana’s songs spoke for themselves, showcasing the undeniable talent of the musicians, their songwriting, their knowledge of their instruments, and their vocals. Each song was carefully played as Corsicana kept their instruments taut, leading the crowd through 55 minutes of raw, unfiltered emotional honesty. Whether it was the switch from the “A side” of the album to the “B side,” there wasn’t a moment where the band didn’t pour their hearts onto the stage and leave them there for all to see. Up there exposed, Corsicana thrived in the openness of it all. They somehow even sounded better live than on the record. I would be surprised and disappointed if they didn’t take advantage of their performance excellence and put out an alternative release of Perennial as a live session EP.

As a rock band, Corsicana quiets themselves to be loud. They’ve figured out who they are even before their first record, and this time around they’re allowing themselves to glow without the worry of it all. It’s a special thing to see- the moment a band considers themselves worthy of their fans, when all along the fans felt that they were the ones who were thankful for them. Even when Corsicana ended their set, their fans erupted chanting, “Encore!” Corsicana walked back onto the stage and played a finale song, letting fans know that even when all is said and done, they are thankful for them and all their support.

People talk about seeing bands before they become big because they knew the moment they saw them they would be someone. Corsicana is one of those valuable Denver indie bands. I wouldn’t be shocked if they signed to a label in a year or two. Dare I say, they are one of Denver’s finest bands and their release show proved it.

Keep up with Coriscana here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Denver's Foxxes Are Starting the Right Kind of Fires

By: Sam Piscitelli

On January 17th, 2019, I was introduced to the Denver music scene. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. Although, I had listened to Foxxe’s sophomore release, “Firestarter” a couple of hours prior to their release party at Globe Hall, I had never ventured out and seen the live music Denver had to offer. I have to say though, this first experience was one I’ll never forget.

From the moment Foxxes stepped onto the stage, they captivated the entire room, as if they somehow had the ability to make people gravitate towards them. There was something in the air, and whether it was the band’s agreed upon excitement about playing live for the first time in little over a year, or their driven intent on delivering an album that made them feel complete as musicians, you could tell this performance was going to be their most heartfelt yet.

Foxxes.

Foxxes.

As the band started to play, you could feel Globe Hall come alive. Their energy engulfed the room, leaving nothing but their music to be heard. With their delicate delivery, but powerful presence, the audience joined Foxxes as they traveled across their new discography and dipped into their old catalog as well. Their subtle control over their own compositions and melodies relayed a sense of envy. For a band who is only now releasing their second album, the members of Foxxes are experts in their craft.

Each member stood up on the stage bathing in their own individual glory. This wasn’t a feeling of just watching another well-oiled rock machine, but rather watching equally talented musicians in their own right come together to perform a piece of art that has brought them together. While Foxxe’s approach to rock music isn’t as deafening as other acts, their ability to pull you in, come together and set the room on fire with controlled flames shows that while, yes, they’re young as a band, they nonetheless have a deep musical prowess. What made their release party even better though was the authenticity of it all. They weren’t trying to be someone else or pretending to be better than they are because they know who they are is good enough for them.

By the end of the night, they thanked the audience for their patience, for their time, and for their support. They then reminded their fans that while they would like to be paid for their art, they understand if you can't afford it or aren’t willing to pay and told fans they could take a free copy of their record Firestarter if they’d like. I was blown away. They explained by saying that they “just want their music to be heard.” To Foxxes, what matters to them is the music and to them, their music being heard was the real reward. The following day I bought both their albums and considered myself a fan.

Live music has a tendency to have a fight or flight atmosphere to it, one where you're never sure what you as the listener will hear or not hear. I came in that night to Globe Hall with no expectations, but I left with the confidence that the Denver music scene is in good hands.

Keep up with Foxxes here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: American Grizzly's "In The Distance" Is A Journey Of Letting Go & Letting Be

By: Sam Piscitelli

In the course of our lives, we find ourselves repeating the cycle of dating: letting someone in just to realize later on that they aren’t right for us or that we aren’t right for them. If we’re lucky the cycle can be halted, if not we can become restless while pining for a long, overdue break. Rather than focus on the journey what love has set itself up to be, we focus on the peaks and valleys it provides. American Grizzly’s new single “In The Distance” beautifully depicts the acknowledgement of this bittersweet hardship through the lenses of letting go and letting be.

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While a myriad of breakup songs are delivered as either searing letters of revenge or false betterment, “In The Distance” withdraws from the normalcy that is placed before it. Rather, it relishes in the luxury of time, the perspective it’s given and the ability to move forward knowing that, this one particular love is buried and in the past. It’s a strong shot of truth and accountability, followed by understanding and acceptance. American Grizzly’s execution is not only flawless and refreshing, but showcases that the band is willing to go the unseen route to pursue what their truth is rather than capitalizing on current music trends for fame or fortune.

American Grizzly is a shining example of the difference between creating music and curating it. They write for their music to be sustainable through the years, not to just be a flash in the pan. “In The Distance” is a testament to that, through emotional intellect and a heart on the sleeve approach we are introduced to a song that is well-crafted and forged with the utmost care and respect. If “In The Distance” is only the single released so far, then the forthcoming album will be a record to remember.

Keep up with American Grizzly here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Corsicana's "Reprieve" Recalls The Detriments Of Growing Up

By: Sam Piscitelli

Growing up as naive children we tend to imagine life as an exploration of majestic intent. We prefer to seek out our own wanderlust in order to see what the world has prepared for us. There’s an impression that the lives we lead will be difficult at times but we tend to see it as less realistic and more fantasy than anything else. In Corsicana’s new single “Reprieve” from their forthcoming record Perennial, that flawed logic falls short as we’re given an authentic perspective into the detriments of growing up.

Corsicana makes it clear within their first line that there’s essentially no give and take left in their adult lives except when they’re asleep. With taut precision and delicate placements Corsicana’s “Reprieve” introduces us to the loss of innocence, the unwarranted heaviness it leaves on your chest and the undying life of having life figured out only to end up questioning the answers you had before. The song is contradictory in the sense that it lulls you into a warm familiarity while also causing a recurring shock of wondering what’s ahead, but it’s the contradictories complexity that makes the song genuinely sincere. The ability to mourn while comprehending the ability to move forward is the basis of learning to live through life.

Corsicana.

Corsicana.

The attempts at painting a picture that is a universal struggle may seem like a challenge, but here, it’s done with ease. It just goes to show that an old idea can have a nuanced perspective when done right. It’s a welcomed approach to an idea that’s seemingly been all dried up. The idea of growing older is largely capitalized on, but is rarely executed right. While Twenty-One Pilots hint at growing up as unromantic and Taylor Swift muses she wants to turn back time, Corsicana’s take is about relying on life to balance itself out. “Reprieve” is a song that expertly unravels life’s little moments, whether that may be the beauty, the ugly, or the fine line that treads between them.

Keep up with Corsicana here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Decadence: Bass, Balloons, & Everything We Loved About This Year's Festival

By: Benjamin Tillis

After several consecutive years of bringing dance music entertainment to Denver, Decadence has become an established music festival during New Year’s holiday season, and it shows. BolderBeat attended the first night of the two-day, EDM-focused event, and we were impressed to see clear improvements from previous years.

First, the lineup…

The first night of Decadence was clearly geared more to the “hard” EDM loving fans. With names like Zed’s Dead and Bassnectar, there were some big dubstep fans ready to get down. The lineup for New Year’s Eve was a little more dancey and mainstream, with names like Marshmello headlining.

Decadence. Photo Credit: Jay Bird.

Decadence. Photo Credit: Jay Bird.

On January 30th, with two main stages and a smaller silent disco, Decadence had no choice but to stack the lineup with talent, and they did just that. The first notable names of the night were Above & Beyond and Alison Wonderland. Although these two acts are significantly different styles of EDM, this was clearly the attendees’ most difficult decision regarding which show to see. Bouncing around both stages, it was obvious that each show was its own party. But Alison Wonderland garnered a larger crowd, which made sense. The only DJs whose names were sported on fans’ clothing were Allison Wonderland and Bassnectar.

Which brings us to the most anticipated performance of the night. Bassnectar, a Colorado favorite, did what he does best: mixing new and old hip-hop with his hard hitting classics. This night’s set included a fun, sped-up remix of “Teach Me How to Dougie,” which of course got the whole crowd moving.

Silent Disco. Photo Credit: Jay Bird.

Silent Disco. Photo Credit: Jay Bird.

Meanwhile, if you wanted a break from the big stages, there were always enough headphones to go around at the “Silent Disco.” Always a fun battle of colors, there were constantly three different DJs competing to change the headphones to their own “channel.” It was surprisingly easy to be social at the Silent Disco though; you could take off your headphones and chat it up with your dancing neighbors!

Vegas favorite Skrillex closed the night with an hour-long 2AM set. He played the oldie “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites,” and also the entirety of his newer remixes of rap songs, both Kendrick Lamar’s “Humble“ and Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode.“ The fans were pleased; this set definitely had the most jumping and moving compared to the others.

Next, the logistics…

New Year’s is inevitably a hectic holiday, and when you pack thousands of partying people into one building, it is easy for things to get out of hand. But Decadence did a great job of controlling everything. Entering and exiting moved smoothly, although security was still diligent. And coat check, which can prove to be a huge time waster at events like this, ran efficiently, which was awesome to see. The only word of advice to those who don’t want to wait out the end of their night in the cold at Decadence is to leave 20 minutes before the last set ends to avoid waiting forever for an overpriced Uber/Lyft. Spoken from experience.

Lastly, the production…

The lights and lasers at the stages were impressive, but you didn’t need to see a show to experience cool visuals. Throughout the Denver Convention Center were different light fixtures and displays that had fans double-taking over and over again. Above the crowd were interesting inflated white balloons, and UFO-looking ships that lowered and raised to the music. It was a playground for adults and a really cool sight to see.

After a very successful weekend, it’s safe to say we’re even more excited now to see what Decadence has in store for ringing in 2020!

-Ben

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.