Premiere: LiteLvl's New Music Video Is an Ambisonic Audio & 360-Degree Visual Experience

LiteLvL released their debut single “Boost Your Immunity While You Sleep/Inspire Photosynthesis In Plants” last week. The duo, comprised of Katey Sleeveless (Eros & the Eschaton) and Jay Marz (King Eddie), are self-described as “installation soundscore.” Today, we’re proud to premiere their debut music video for the track:

“Boost Your Immunity While You Sleep/Inspire Photosynthesis In Plants” was mixed with ambisonic audio, which means just like the video itself, the sound is also three-dimensional. Filmed at Moon Magnet Studios, the video features LiteLvl members Katey Sleeveless and Jay Marz, Andy Ai & Kevin Netz on visuals/projections, and dancers Kailani Dobso & Holly Seidcheck. Videographer Ben Tyson of DenVR is behind the entrancing, psychedelic video experience.

LiteLvl. Photo Credit:   Julianna Photography

LiteLvl. Photo Credit: Julianna Photography

“As you move, you'll hear different things. When you look at one guitar amp, you'll hear more of it. When you turn around, it'll feel like that amp is now behind you, and you hear the second amp in front of you louder.” frontman Jay Marz said of the trippy, mylar-fueled experience.

The band play FoCoMX - Fort Collins Music eXperiment this Saturday, April 27th at 4PM at Art Lab Fort Collins.

Keep up with LiteLvL here.

Modern Suspects Release New Music Video for "Desufnoc"

By: Julia Talen

On April 1st, Denver band Modern Suspects released a music video for their latest single “Desufnoc.” Filmed entirely on an iPhone X, guitarist Bart William’s visualized the inspiration behind the film, while frontman Garret Myers wrote the song, galvanized out of a devastating tragedy in which a close friend of his died in a plane crash.

If you haven’t figured it out yet, “Desufnoc,” is confused spelled backwards, and the single and video grip viewers as the group explores the absurdities and the inexplicable aspects of life through visual and audio media.

The video opens with an old Volvo pulling out of a garage on a dry, sunny day. There is music in the background and the viewer thinks that the song is beginning, but the camera hones in the the Volvo’s driver- a woman in a leopard coat with blue hair- listening to what’s on the radio. Anticipation builds as she pulls into a parking garage and we wonder where she is going, but before we can find out, she walks past a series of framed pictures hung on a wall and the camera zooms in to one of the frames, taking the viewer into another realm of the film as the song begins.

As the music flows, the camera continues to hone in on other picture frames, glasses, or mirrors and we melt into new scenes. This movement between different corners of life through pictures and frames elevates lyrics such as, “I’m confused/I’m confused/I feel so confused/Don’t know which way to go.” Viewers become disoriented much like the aftermath of a tragic and sudden loss. The symbolism of moving through frames also makes the audience consider memory and time, and how these play out in the stories that make up our lives and the lives of others.

Modern Suspects.

Modern Suspects.

As the film progresses, the viewer progresses through scenes that are perhaps touchstones of Myers’ personal experience: there is a scene in a body of water, a cemetary, a church. The film ends with a man running toward a house, jumping through a window into a scene evocative of the beginning of the video. The leopard-coated lady listening to Modern Suspects through headphones then walks past another series of frames hung on a wall as the story closes.

Overall, the video sets out to “confuse” viewers, reflecting on events, scenes, stories, and tragedies that take place each day of our own lives and can easily feel disconnected and absurd.

It’s no doubt that Modern Suspects’ visual and musical talent shine in this dreamy pop tune, beautifully accompanied by a thought-provoking video project which brings viewer closer to the lyrics of the track.

Keep up with Modern Suspects here.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Denver's Boot Gun Debuts with a Bang with Two Singles & a New Music Video

Denver’s Boot Gun have entered the Colorado music scene with a serious bang. Today, the three-piece are releasing their debut single and video for “Virginia,” a high-energy rock’n’roll track with a Southern twang, and a rebellious video featuring a slew of Denver haunts to match. And folks, one thing’s for sure, the trio comprised of Keith Lawrence (guitar/vocals), Davie Landry (bass/vocals), and Cody Hart (drums), have brought the party.

“Virginia” was recorded and mixed by Todd Divel (The Yawpers, In The Whale, The Velveteers) of Silo Sound and mastered by Hans Liburd of Burdhouse Mastering. The video was directed and filmed by Colin Anders of Slice Cinematics (Nathaniel Rateliff & The Nightsweats, A Shadow of a Jaguar, Dragondeer). Boot Gun also featured several friends on the track’s instrumentals including Bullfrog Baugh on harmonica, who makes an appearance in the video about 40 seconds in, Sam Janik on guitar, and Bill McKay on organ and piano.

Says frontman Keith Lawrence about the track, "Virginia came to me in multiple dreams last summer. I showed the boys the main riff and they said ‘Sounds great. Where's the rest of the song?' I told 'em I had to go back to sleep to hear [and] see the rest of it. A few months and a couple of disco naps later, we had us a rock’n’roll ripper."

A ripper it is indeed. “Virginia” is a boot-stompin’ tune rife with slashing rips, harmonica twang, and a jangly toe-tappin’ keys solo that will force you on your feet. Some of that energy didn’t enter the track until the boys rounded things out in the studio though.

Says Keith, “As a band, we all believe that a song isn't finished being written until we record it. Todd at Silo pushed for certain creative ideas that we were able to let shine on these tracks. Having Bill McKay sit in on keys helped round out the sound and bring our musical intention into fruition."

Boot Gun. Photo Credit:  Mountain Trout Photography

Boot Gun. Photo Credit: Mountain Trout Photography

Along with “Virginia” and their debut music video, Boot Gun also released their B side “Feels Like A Storm” today. While “Virginia” takes you on a wild ride, quite literally in the video, “Feels Like A Storm” is the moodier, heavy-hitting track from the trio.

Says Davie, “‘Storm’ is a song that we wrote collectively. It started with Keith singing but never felt completely right. So we argued and laughed, and laughed and argued, and I was forced to sing it… In the end, it became the beast that you're listening to today."

You can listen to “Virginia” and “Feels Like A Storm” on all major streaming platforms and catch Boot Gun live at Cervantes with Dave Watts & Friends on Friday, April 12th.

Says Davie on Boot Gun’s debut, “It’s a young band's take on all the rock’n'roll we love and grew up on. We go from A to Z, then back to A just make sure you're still with us."

Join that trip and keep up with Boot Gun here.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Simple Parade's "Broken Beauties" Music Video Is Elegant In Its Simplicity

By: Sam Piscitelli

Since their birth, music videos have primarily been used as visual tools to either tell a story or to garner some sort of response, whether it be for views or for artistic consumption. It’s a way to let the artist’s fans get a glimpse into their head and see a particular song from the perspective they drew their creativity from. Most importantly, a music video can either make or break the song you want it to represent. In their recent video release, Denver’s The Simple Parade don’t allow the nonsense of pressure to dictate their art; rather they let their art dictate the video.

The Simple Parade’s “Broken Beauties” music video aims for potent storytelling rather than reliance on visual escapades. The acoustic approach to the song met with the winding-down city as the day seeps into the night really gives the listener a chance to embrace the ambiance of it all. It makes “Broken Beauties” flourish actually. In the kind of atmosphere that is being portrayed, the lyrics are more accessible and seemingly slip easier into the ear of whoever is listening. This gives the songwriting a front and center spotlight usually unheard of in music videos, which is brilliant when you think about it.

The “Broken Beauties” video depicts frontman Justin Hooper with just a guitar in hand singing while walking through downtown Denver. While it’s not a high-budget video nor one that tries to be, it’s definitely charming in its simplicity, much like the track. Some say elegance can be born from simplicity, and simplicity can lead to excellence. In this case, that’s exactly what is seen (and heard) with The Simple Parade.

Keep up with The Simple Parade here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.


The Strange American's "Till You're Told" Music Video Is Symbolic Of The Musician's Journey

By: Sam Piscitelli

As a musician, whether you’re a solo artist or in a band, there is this acknowledgement that comes with garnering a certain amount of fans or receiving positive praise. It’s as though you are no longer a lone act playing your songs in your bedroom; instead you seem to be a well-known somebody. From there, all seems like it will move upwards rather than careening into a haze of obscurity. But, what people don’t know is the long-haul you’ve placed yourself in; the countless times you  practice your craft, the stomach-turning preparation of every interview or review of you and your art, and the unnerving fear that as quickly as your dreams were made, they can just as easily disappear. In their music video for “Till You’re Told” the Strange Americans symbolically covers the landscape of the music business while also relying on the talent that brought them their success.

The video begins with each band member on their own, forging their individual paths. They all carry one item with them, the items being symbolic of who the band is when they come together. The symbolism in the music video is very subjective, but to me each item plays off one another. For example; the lantern is for the fire the band has inside of themselves, the sticks are the framework of the band, the amp is the way in which they express themselves through music, the shovel is about burying the past, and the suitcase is for the accomplished dreams they wish to carry with them one day. With their now unified front, the Strange Americans then begin to traverse the land together. To me, this shows that while they are further than they’ve ever been before, they’re still on the journey. It’s a music video that reflects upon anyone’s time in the music industry. You can walk for miles with the passions you have, the items you bring along for the ride and create as much as you want, but nothing is certain.

While the symbolism can- and mostly likely will be debated- we can’t ignore how this video catches the heart of the struggling musician. It’s a message that no matter how much you go through from the very beginning till the end of your make or break career, that nothing will be set in stone, especially your reputation “Till You’re Told” otherwise. In a business that is continuously changing, the only thing you can be sure of is the work you put out into the world. Once it’s out there, it represents you and that’s what matters. For a video that has a lot of hidden meanings, it’s untold truth is undeniable.

Keep up with the Strange Americans here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Spiral Cell Debut New Trippy Music Video for "Consonance"

By: Norman Hittle

“Consonance,” the second official music video from Spiral Cell debuts today. Don’t let the maze in the tree rings keep you guessing- watch it right here:

For those of you familiar with SC’s concepts, this video fits the canon of what you likely already know as far as plot lines go, but for those not fully aware, perhaps a quick trip through The Maze in the Tree Rings will give some perspective.

The video conveys a clean array of artistic shots tied together in a stylistic approach, directed by Noe DeLeon. Contrary to the layout in SC’s debut video for “Prologue” (where the video was centered more on a cinematic approach), “Consonance” highlights more of a taste of the live experience brought to the table featuring the man behind the mask: Scott Uhl. With his myriad of looping pedals and instrumental setups, it’s easy to see how his meticulous work makes for the engaging one man show that is Spiral Cell.

As for the project in general, Scott and his crew sum it up perfectly: “Spiral Cell is an immersive, theatrical, multi-level experience of music, storytelling, visuals, and art. Musically, Spiral Cell combines elements of movie/video game scores, layered vocals, dynamic guitar playing and multi-instrument looping. Add in a storyline with visuals, dialogue, and a synchronized light show and you can begin to grasp the live experience.”

Keep up with Spiral Cell on Facebook, and for the full experience, check out their next live performance January 27th, 2019. Event details here!

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Fast Car Slow Car Has Us Dreaming About "Waffles"

By: Julia Talen

Philly-based bassist Breshon Martzall of The Districts’ offshoot project Straw Hats has ventured into his own side project called Fast Car Slow Car. He recently released a music video for his latest single called “Waffles” and it’s definitely worth a watch. The trippy video embodies a DIY vibe, gritty and not overly-produced, containing intriguing visuals, contemplative themes, humor, and rad wackiness.

The video opens with Martzall standing in front of a blank wall with an animation projected onto it, and corded phones hanging upside down; a very peculiar, inverted world evocative of the track’s lyrics “I feel so upside down on picture perfect days.” The opening shot is a play on perceptions, reality, and truth, priming viewers for the remaining scenes and shots of the film. As the video progresses, multi-colored shapes like circles, squares, and hearts distort, focus in on, or cover up parts of each frame, elevating the videos themes surrounding confusion and search for clarity.

The self-aware intermission in the video made me chuckle, filled with silly factoids about waffles, offering a reminder to not read too deeply into the trippiness of the video and perhaps the world’s general absurdity. Either way, the project evokes, intrigues, and invites a rewatch.

Keep up with Fast Car Slow Car here.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Future Joy's New Music Video for "Thirsty" Is Saxually Satisfying

Denver’s Future Joy are known for their sultry sax sounds. They’re self-proclaimed as a “saxually active glitch hop” outfit and 303 Magazine recently called their new self-titled record the “sweet spot between the heavy hitters and sexy saxophone serenades.” Today, the band dropped their music video for the track “Thirsty” and we’re stoked to premiere it for you here:

Future Joy, comprised of Zach Simms on saxophone (MLIMA) and Frederic Park on percussion, is a seriously tasty combination of all things electronic with sax, funk, and hip-hop thrown in. The result is saxually satisfying, and “Thirsty” feels like a banger from its opening riff.

Annabelle.

Annabelle.

Denver’s Annabelle, whose whisper vocals are featured on the track, stars in the video alongside dancers Gina and Sheridan. Annabelle choreographed the video, which was filmed and edited by Connor Tieulie. She also sings on much of Future Joy’s latest record.

The video’s location may look familiar to some Denverites- it was shot at Tetra Lounge and The Bolt Factory; later Jeffrey Charles Stanley added in the animations and graphics. These give the video a real psych party vibe.

Said Simms of filming the video, “We didn’t have too much planning- we just went with the flow of the locations and let the editors do their thing.”

Simms and Park.

Simms and Park.

The track “Thirsty” was recorded in Simms’ living room before the duo made their way to Side 3 Studios for finishing touches, which included Annabelle’s vocals and her opening a can of seltzer water because everyone knows LaCroix is the best way to booze these days.

Simms and Park have already started working on their next record, and are planning for an early 2019 release. Prior to, they’ve got a Colorado tour in the works, so keep up with their live dates here and turn up with “Thirsty.”

joemurray. Drops New "Greater Than I Am" Music Video

By: Julia Talen

At the end of April, Denver-based indie musician Joe Murray (stylized as joemurray.) released his latest single, “Greater Than I Am” with a music video composed of visual representations reflective of the song’s intent and lyrics. “Greater Than I Am” speaks to the very human experience of wanting to be something “great than” you are in the current moment while grappling with the long journey it takes to get there.

The video opens with a bird’s eye view of cars moving through a circle drive, as well as opening credits that introduce the strong accompanying font that will run throughout the video with the lyrics. As Murray begins singing the lyrics, “I can’t breathe when I’m underwater/But I can see all the way to Mars,” each syllable of a word pops onto a black background in bold white font. The syllables don’t come on the screen in the same places, or even in left-to-right linear order, and your eyes can’t seem settle on one focal point when you’re watching. This visual element to the video emphasizes the theme of taking a spiralized pathway toward your goals, rather than something straight forward. Additionally, because the words to the song are segmented on the screen, the step-by-step process of building and reaching one’s goal is further showcased.

As the tune moves toward the refrain, the backdrop changes to a tape of fireworks lighting up the night’s sky within a frame of water moving over rocks and swimming fish. Murray’s careful to put the fireworks video inside the frame because the end goal (or to the “moon” as Murray references lyrically) is enveloped in experiences of feeling stuck (“underwater”) and moving through those emotions.

As the track progresses, and our eyes search the screen for the next syllable of a lyric, images- like a pathway up a mountain, a band playing for an audience, the carp swimming, a train passing, a bird- become layers of one another, mixing and meshing, like the instances that bring us to our achievements.

31490748_1653001538109232_4748654260663615488_o.jpg

It’s no doubt that Murray’s music video has been intentionally crafted to accentuate the meaning of his new single. Viewers don’t miss a beat trying to understand where Murray is coming from. If fact they’ll relate to the human experience of moving through life, wanting something more, but having to be patient and work a little bit each day to get to where they want to be.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

 

King Eddie's New Music Video Was Inspired By A Family Member's Life Saving Liver Transplant

Last November, psych rock and multimedia group King Eddie released their second full-length record Holographic Universe. The album is “reminiscent of some of the more lo-fi Britpop concepts of the late 70s mixed with perhaps a touch of Tame Impala’s signature modern version of psychedelic rock.”

Recently, the band unveiled their latest music video at Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Denver for their track “ENTER THE MAN,” the sixth tune on the record. Teeming with the trippy visuals the band is known for, the video was shot at Denver’s Globeville Riverfront Art Space “on a very cold day in January.” It was directed and edited by Steve Besette & Kendal Hurst and costumed by Jacqueline Cordova, who stars in the video alongside Nick Ellingson. King Eddie’s members also make painted appearances.

The song, which was remixed for the video by Mike Schulze (director of the University of Denver's Recording Arts program), also has a powerful story behind it which heavily influenced the direction of the video creatively.

Velvet Adams of King Eddie. 

Velvet Adams of King Eddie. 

Shares frontman Jay Mars, “‘ENTER THE MAN’ started as a song I wrote in Atlanta shortly after my father's life saving organ transplant. The summer of 2016, he was diagnosed with an aggressive liver disease, and by Thanksgiving, I was headed to Georgia to either witness a miracle or say goodbye. The disease exposed a lot of fault lines within my own family, and power struggles that made my ability to care for him and my own search for answers even more difficult. His boss called me a week before Thanksgiving… I didn't realize how sick he was, and I needed to get there as soon as possible. I felt like the situation was being covered up, and I didn't know why or what for. I was stunned to see what the disease had done to his body in a few months. I didn't even recognize him… ”

Jay Mars.

Jay Mars.

As he waited for his father in the intensive surgical recovery center for over a week after the transplant operation, Mars began writing “ENTER THE MAN.”

Says Mars, “I wrote what become the chorus, and the lyrics, ‘Faith enter the man, through a hole inside his head.’ I see this song as a psychedelic drama about staring down your own mortality. The lyrics ‘in a white room stripped to your own, you'll find out yourself’ were inspired by something he said about heading into the surgery, at the 11:59:59 of his life, knowing there was no going back, and he would either die or have a second chance at life. The surgery room was white, circular, surrounded by doctors, and he was lying naked in the center of the room, surrounded by unfamiliar experts in liver pathology. It's hard to imagine what that must have felt like. My best guess is the hallway scene in the video, racing toward something… and on the other side: he miraculously wakes up. ‘ENTER THE MAN’ is a song that explores mortality, the relationship between mind and body, life and death, condemnation and rebirth. We live often completely wrapped up in stories we've projected onto ourselves, about ourselves, about others, the way life is and ought to be. I wanted to explore that space because I thought that's where dissatisfaction might instinctively arise. ‘ENTER THE MAN,’ and the rest of our album Holographic Universe are furthermore inspired by the writings of Michael Talbot in his book The Holographic Universe, asking: If reality is maya, or illusion, can we create our own hologram?”

Whether or not we can, King Eddie sure try. Watch their psychedelic experience above and keep up with King Eddie here.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Viretta To Release New Music Video This Friday (03/30)

By: Mirna Tufekcic

Viretta, a Denver-based alt-rock band, is coming out with a 12-track album that took over two years to complete. Why? The band took it upon themselves to record and mix the whole thing in their own studio, making it sound exactly the way they wanted. The tracks were their oysters. 

28826966_10155931081915813_8672905285507102337_o.jpg

As it turns out, taking on this task all by themselves was no small feat. Mike Moroni, Viretta’s frontman, lightheartedly admits to the pains and turmoil of taking on such an endeavor saying, “It was hell!” Ultimately though, he acknowledges it was worth the fruits of labor. Combining the heavy riffs reminiscent of Queens of Stone Age and with Radiohead-like reverb, the album fronts an electric hard-rock swagger with vulnerable and emotional wanting. And now the band wants you to get ready!

The single off the upcoming album, “You are My IV” is already out. If the rest of the tracks deliver like this song does, then we’re all in for an angsty, roaring, riff-rocking treat to satisfy all our alt-rock cravings.

The Fear is scheduled for release in full across all platforms on May 18th. In lieu of the date, Viretta will be releasing three music videos to get you amped, starting with the first video for the album’s second track “Cordyceps,” which will be released this Friday, March 30th to view online, or if you find yourself on Market Street in Denver at The Black Buzzard, Oskar Blues Grill & Brew you can see it in person. Viretta will play a live show, along with The SIR Band, before unveiling the video to the crowd.

Want more details? Head to the Facebook event and get tickets!

-Mirna 

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: J.W. Schuller's Signature Humor Is Apparent In New Music Video For "No mud in Joyville"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

BolderBeat first caught up with Boulder transplant and singer/songwriter J.W. Schuller about a year ago when he released his tongue-in-cheek video for “When I’m President.” Schuller is well-known for injecting his sense of humor into his work, and his recent release for his single “No mud in Joyville” is no different.

“No mud in Joyville” is the title track from Schuller’s newest record, which dropped this past January. The song’s somewhat nonsensical verses and catchy chorus are of Schuller’s signature style, one which keeps the listener wondering what he’ll say next and simultaneously has them singing along after a minute or two. In the song, Schuller imagines a place where there won’t be hate, deer ticks, and of course, mud among other things.

J.W. Schuller.

J.W. Schuller.

The video for “No mud in Joyville,” which we’re premiering here today, brings Schuller’s goofy sensibilities to light. The video features scenes of Schuller and his bearded nephew Jens Larson playing in front of an old stove in a living room of sorts, interspersed with abstract skeleton art sequences, and at one point a scene where they launch skittles from a drum in Larson’s mouth.

Said Jeff about the video, “I conceived and directed the video and it was shot on an iPhone 6 by the abstract artist Jaci Lee Reno, who I'm also lucky to call my wife. The flower and skeleton imagery in the video is an offshoot of my idea for the album cover. I've always been struck by Mexican Day of the Dead folk art and the juxtaposition of skeleton figures and flowers have been a recurring theme in videos and gig posters for me. It’s kind of an off-puttingly cute way to reflect on our mortality, I guess."

Schuller and Larson.

Schuller and Larson.

No mud in Joyville is the second release from Schuller as a solo artist, and is a follow-up to his 2013 release All Important Artists. His latest was recorded and mixed at Underwood Studios in Minneapolis by Mark Stockert, which are Schuller’s old stomping grounds.

J.W. Schuller’s album release show is slated for Saturday, March 10th at The Walnut Room in Denver with Red Petals and Kait Berreckman. Snag tickets here and make sure to keep up with Schuller on Facebook.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Kyle Emerson Invites You Into His Living Room In New Video For "Wise Blood"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

2017 was arguably a breakout year for Denver’s Kyle Emerson. The former Plum member released an EP, Worth It, in May of last year, which he followed up just a few months later with Dorothy Alice, his debut full-length album via Guilty Pleasure Records. OpenAir CPR called Worth It one of the best records of the year, and both Denver Post’s The Know and Marquee Magazine listed Dorothy Alice as one of the top Colorado albums of 2017.

Kyle Emerson.

Kyle Emerson.

Though Emerson’s solo sound careens with components of his former life as a psych-rocker in Plum, there are more traces of jazz and folk in his latest work. He’s combined drippy guitars with synth sounds, a slide guitar with Beatles-esque pop harmonies, and soft, Elliott Smith-like vocals with upbeat and catchy melodies. These elements paired with the slacker-rock revival vibes of someone like Kurt Vile and the production work of Sunboy’s Justin Renaud have formed much of what you’ll hear on Dorothy Alice, and more specifically on Emerson’s single “Wise Blood.”

Today, Emerson has released a video for “Wise Blood,” which you can check out in our exclusive premiere below. It showcases Emerson and his bandmates (who are somewhat of their own Colorado supergroup, with members from Paper Bird, Shady Elders, Bluebook, and Sunboy) in a living room performance interspersed with scenes of the band cruising around Denver and generally hanging out. The video has a vintage film look in certain parts and meanders with the song’s melody from scene to scene.

Kyle Emerson has arguably made more noise in the Denver music scene in mere months than most, and is a Colorado artist you should be following if you weren’t already. Make sure to give Dorothy Alice a listen here and “Wise Blood” a view above.

What will 2018 hold for Emerson and his supergroup? We’re stoked to find out.

Keep up with Kyle Emerson here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Indigenous Robot Take You To Space With "One World"

By: Norman Hittle

Denver’s Indigenous Robot are not your run-of-the-mill “out there” sort of band. Instead, they’re more a culmination of "out there" ideals ranging from hints of indie legends The Flaming Lips to psychedelic rock legends The Doors. Even better, they just released a video that sums up their artistry for their latest song “One World.” Check it out:

As you can see, Indigenous Robot doesn’t hesitate to put it all out there. Their video (which looks to be filmed at none other than Colorado Springs' own Garden of the Gods) highlights a retro Star Trek vibe while managing to include some modern day video tech, which is fitting because a lot about Indigenous Robot and their sound is modernly retro. The video has already won "Outstanding Music Video" by Zed Fest Film Festival

Indigenous Robot.

Indigenous Robot.

Regarding their song “One World,” the band does well both grounding the listener with their gritty dirge-like bass and guitar while also allowing the mind to wander with shimmering vocal effects over calm singing and synths. Interestingly enough, the band’s ability to create an almost mundane, yet groove-laden arrangement manages to hook the listener and leaves a haunting reverie throughout the experience. It reminds me a great deal of some of Queens of the Stone Age’s deeper cuts and fan favorites “I Think I Lost My Headache” and “Gonna Leave You”.

If you enjoy “One World” check out Indigenous Robot's 2014 release Revolting and their 2013 EP Castles.

Keep up with Indigenous Robot here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Grayson County Burn Ban Release Second Single From Upcoming Debut Record 'Better Neighbor'

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s Grayson County Burn Ban first came together in 2014 after frontman Austen Grafa was on the road with another Colorado band and decided he wanted to combine two of his favorite genres: country and rock’n’roll. Having grown up in Texas, Grafa was inspired by songwriters like Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker, Terry Allen, and Robert Earl Keen. After teaming up with fellow Denver musicians Nate Wilson, Travis Page, Brian Beer, and Tyler Brewer (Ned Garthe Explosion), GCBB was formed and Grafa began using his influences to craft what is now considered the band’s “campfire country” sound.

This January, GCBB are releasing their debut record, titled Better Neighbor. The title track from the 12-song release is already out with an accompanying music video (see above), and one that is hard for any Denverite not to laugh along with. It details (rather sarcastically) some of the trials of Denver city life, like trying to park in Cap Hill, or the frustration many have faced when finding recyclable beer cans in the trash bin after day-drinking in Cheesman Park. The song’s refrain, “Are you an idiot? Or just an asshole?” will have you laughing as the band members experience other annoyances while venturing around their neighborhood and asking you to be the exact thing the title of their new record suggests.

Today, the band has released their second single and accompanying video for their song “Up Here.”

Animated by artist, Sarah Letteny, the video follows a character slowly climbing up a ladder in black and white while reflecting on the world down below before it falls through a psychedelic-colored sky back to its colorless reality. As the chorus repeats, “I’m higher than I’ve ever been/looking down at this little world I’m in/Everything is making sense/but I don’t know if I should be alone up here,” things like money and cars appear just out of reach of the video’s character before it crashes through the clouds.

Said Grafa about the video, “Sarah did an amazing job bringing our vision to life for this song, which is, as the lyrics state, all about being ‘a little too high,’ where you can see everything going on, but maybe you shouldn’t be so high alone.”

“Up Here” continues GCBB’s “campfire country” sound with Grafa’s rolling, storytelling vocals over guitar before it breaks into a full-band-at-your-favorite-dive-bar slow country jam.

19399528_1228192950642699_2528828117811003195_n.jpg

Grayson County Burn make the kind of music you want to crush cans to. Just make sure you recycle those when you're finished.

Keep up with Grayson County Burn Ban here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Hollow Are Making A Lot More Noise Than Just "Sleep Talkin'"

By: Elizabeth Lee

The goal of The Hollow (a band we once joined on tour aboard their "CrowBus") is very straightforward: “to deliver exceptional music that makes you fall in love with rock and roll all over again.” Since the alternative-rock band was formed in 2013, they have done exactly that, aiming to transform the landscape of contemporary rock and roll music. They released their first EP in 2015 and are now on the tail of an extremely successful tour in 2016, which has featured sold out shows, national support appearances, and festival slots.

21762706_1452031011512927_3379998576234412785_o.jpg

“Sleep Talkin” is their latest single, accompanied by a newly released music video, which dropped November 4th. The video is a testimony to all that The Hollow has worked for, collaborating with Kind Dub, AlphaPixel Digital, Evergroove Studio and many others. The song focuses on honesty and open communication in relationships, as the video shows a couple heading to sleep with unspoken words.

Watch "Sleep Talkin'":

Visually, the video is evocative and eye-catching, serving as a metaphor for the narrator’s struggle. The single keeps with the band’s hard-hitting, focused style of rock'n'roll, with a heavy rhythm section, skillfully layered guitar-laced with strong vocals, and powerful lyrics. The Hollow draw their influence from rock icons such as MUSE and Queens of the Stone Age, and it shows even in the mood of the video.

Check out “Sleep Talkin” and be sure to catch The Hollow at their next live show, December 9th at Peak 31 Union Station in Colorado Springs.

Keep up with the band here.

-Elizabeth

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

A Shadow Of Jaguar Release New Music Video "Don't Want to Die Here" In Anticipation Of Debut Record 'RAW'

By: Andrew Wright

The 60s and 70s were largely marked by civil unrest on multiple fronts, and when you compare those times to the events of today, it’s not hard to see similarities. Music artists are picking up on that reality, and bringing back not only the sound of that time, but the ideas and movements as well. A Shadow of Jaguar’s new music video “Don’t Want To Die Here” is one example of this kind of art. The music video features a woman dancing in white against a white screen with multiple apocalyptic images behind her, and at one point, the dancer even puts a small sunflower in her mouth before anything starts, beginning with a sort of symbolic silence that harkens back to “flower children” of the late 60s, an acid hit, and the anti-war protest of the 60s and 70s all at once.

The music itself here has crunchy distortion, a catchy rhythm, and a singer with a vintage-sounding voice (Brian Hubbert) singing about a dismal place, of smoking cities and other ghastly images. He sings the title of the track, “Don’t Want to Die Here” multiple times as a cry for life and safety. The more you listen to this song, the more you almost get a sense of a past voice crying out, but in something that is relevant today with current events, like the threats of nuclear war, civil unrest, and war that seems never ending and unwinnable at times.

A Shadow of Jaguar.

A Shadow of Jaguar.

If you care about music that has the soul of this era in sound and message, then listen to and watch the music video for “Don’t Want to Die Here” by A Shadow of Jaguar. Their debut album, RAW is coming fast, and drops this weekend on October 28th.

Keep up with A Shadow of Jaguar here.

-Andrew

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.
 

Tyto Alba Release Haunting Video For "The Hunger"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s indie rock outfit Tyto Alba released their newest music video this week for their track “The Hunger.” The song is from the band’s EP, In Our Own Time, which dropped earlier this year.

Frontwoman Melanie Steinway’s haunting vocals combined with eerie masked figures make “The Hunger” and its accompanying music video a mysterious and emotive track. The video, which was filmed by Slice Cinematics (A Shadow of Jaguar), showcases Steinway performing at Syntax Physic Opera surrounded by men in feathered masks interspersed with eldritch church scenes and Steinway calling out at her own reflection. Colorado’s Brent Cowles makes an anonymous appearance as the band’s “voodoo priest” at the start of the video as well.

A scene from "The Hunger."

A scene from "The Hunger."

Tyto Alba held their release show for the video last night at Syntax, a venue which has turned into a local haven for many musicians, and which was a new addition to this year’s Underground Music Showcase spots.

Brent Cowles as the "voodoo priest."

Brent Cowles as the "voodoo priest."

Check out the band’s video for yourself above and stay on the lookout for more new music from Tyto Alba by keeping up with the band here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Everything We Know About The Killers' New Record 'Wonderful, Wonderful' Based On Their New Music Videos

By: Benjamin Tillis

On September 22, almost exactly four years after their last album release of Battle Born, The Killers are set to release a new album, Wonderful, Wonderful. Leading up to the 10-track release, the band has shared three singles and two music videos, both of which differ tremendously in style and sound.

The Man,” The Killers first shared track and music video from their new album, is a disco infused, first person narrative of an overconfident Brandon Flowers. It is over the top and hokey, but the video makes it clear that this is intentional. In it, you see Flowers, the band’s lead singer and biggest personality, living what looks to be the perfect life in his hometown of Las Vegas. He shows off his muscles, performs at Vegas shows, and seems to be a hit with his surrounding female counterparts. But as the video continues, the watcher learns that Brandon is nothing close to “The Man.” The video reminds us all that we’re not as great as we think we are.

Deviating from the funky vibes of “The Man,” “Run For Cover” has the same sound as The Killers’ original hits, “Mr. Brightside” and “Somebody Told Me.” The music video stays true to the song’s most repeated line, “Run for cover…don’t look back,” as the storyline focuses on a woman running away from a man she presumably used to be romantic with. All is vague in the video. The band members watch, emotionlessly, a story of a man and woman told not in chronological order. A mysterious white cassette, which is marked only with the single’s release date, July 7, 2017, is sought by both the man and woman. The final scenes show the woman running with the cassette and escaping, after throwing a Molotov cocktail at her ex-lover’s car. The video is mysterious and tells an interesting story behind the somewhat dark lyrics of the song.

Listen to The Killers' title track "Wonderful, Wonderful": 

On August 24th, the band released the title track of their upcoming new album. “Wonderful, Wonderful” is bizarre and eccentric, and the distorted, deep-voice Brandon Flowers belts sounds similar to “Tranquilize” and other older songs found on their compilation album Sawdust. With unique background instruments and biblical-like lyrics, it will be interesting to see if The Killers release a music video for this track. Until then, stay tuned for September 22nd when The Killers release Wonderful, Wonderful, which has already proven to be a combination of both the band’s new and old sounds.

-Benjamin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Treehouse Sanctum's Music Video For "Shebiy," A Jazzy, Instrumental Duet

Earlier this year, we premiered Treehouse Sanctum’s music video for “Chacala,” a single from their 2017 release Vivere. Today, we bring you another video by the band for “Shebiy.” The track is also from Vivere but unlike “Chacala,” it’s purely instrumental. “Shebiy” is jazzy and vacillates between TS members Andrew Horwath on keys and Dewayne Rymer on trumpet.

Horwath, who wrote the song, was inspired to create this track when he was studying the Babylonian Exile of the Jewish people, found in the Book of Daniel, from the Old Testament of the Bible.

Said the band, “The frustrating lack of resolution that is achieved in the 7/8 timing, prevalent in the song, adheres to this premise of a captive being seeking escape.”

Watch "Shebiy": 

Frontman Sam Rymer also shared with us, “I’ve been playing music with Andrew for five years now- our humble drummer never played piano in front of me, other than doodling on it in passing. One winter day last year, just before we were scheduled to start recording Vivere at The Keep Recording Studio in Denver, Andrew sat down while we were taking a break during rehearsal. And then he took off. Dewayne Rymer, our trumpet player, improvised around the chording and we all felt like we were listening to an old conflicted jazz recording for a moment. I asked them both to try that again when we hit the studio and the result is what you hear on the album’s final track, ‘Shebiy.’”  

Treehouse Sanctum. 

Treehouse Sanctum. 

The video for “Shebiy” was filmed at Regis University with Ben Fout of thebande.co. It’s Treehouse Sanctum’s third video release of the year, following “Chacala” and “Play It Cool.”

This Sunday, September 10th, Treehouse Sanctum will take the stage at Denver’s newest outdoor venue, Levitt Pavilion. They’ll share the stage with Nashville’s Humming House and the show is FREE to the public! Make sure to catch them to hear “Shebiy” live, and give their video for the track a view for yourself above.

Keep up with Treehouse Sanctum here.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.