Review: Whiskey Autumn's 'Ice Cream In The Sun' Is Tasty Electropop With R&B Vibes

By: Trevor Ryan

These days, the electronic-leaning movement in music is strong. And although the growing brand definitely holds the current popular vote, it can be challenging to make a true mark worth hearing. But that is exactly where Colorado’s Whiskey Autumn shine through. The project, founded by multi-instrumentalist Greg Laut, is a fluid blend of pop/soul, incredibly catchy synth work, smooth euphonic vocals, and a lyrical witticism that originally found its voice with their EP 2014 EP Into Something New. Though the band has made a turn from Americana to electropop with their latest EP, Ice Cream In The Sun, they’ve managed to keep their music warm and inviting while introducing R&B hooks with synth sounds and soul.

Whiskey Autumn.

Whiskey Autumn.

There’s a futuristic sound blended with their early soul-feel too- you'll hear what I mean in the opening track “Dog Days.” And the song following, “Human Frailty,” brings back the tempo with a slightly more mellow-groove-type R&B vibe, but not enough to really make you question it. This pattern seems to weave throughout the rest of the EP, along with a pretty upbeat energy and catchy storytelling. My favorite track is the closer, “Postcard From Tokyo.” It blends interesting sounds with harmonies that will make you float off into space, or at least I know I did...

Listen to Ice Cream In The Sun:

My only criticism: I would love to see WA experiment with bringing out their percussion even further, with more of a build from time to time. The instrumentals here are very tight though, making this trio refreshing to listen to (Matty Schelling is on drums, Jason Paton is on bass). They seem to have their sound really pined with this record, and I for one am excited to see how they grow with it.

The band has described Ice Cream In The Sun, as their “most confident release yet,” and it’s easy to see why. Giving us a taste of a their new brand of electronic influence with classic R&B nodes, along with that touch of soul ultimately forces our mouths (and ears) to water in the hopes that we may have more from the “Coney Island” crooners sooner rather than later.

Schelling, Laut, & Paton.

Schelling, Laut, & Paton.

Whiskey Autumn play The Fox Theatre Friday, May 26th and have discount tickets available. Contact them on their Facebook for free ticket delivery from the crew (they’ve got $12 presale tickets for you), and follow them on Instagram and Twitter for other updates. The rest of their summer tour schedule throughout Colorado and the Midwest and Southwest can be viewed here.

-Trevor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Brooklyn's A Shadow of Jaguar Release New Music Video For "Keep On Knocking"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

This past fall, Boulder, CO rock duo A Shadow of Jaguar made the move to New York. Now based in Brooklyn, members Brian Hubbert (lead vocals/slide guitar/bass) and Andrew Oakley (drums/vocals) actually laid down several tracks before their Colorado departure at Denver’s Silo Studios back in 2015. One of these tracks, “Keep on Knocking,” is a tune originally written and recorded in 1976 by pronto-punk band Death. The track itself was not released until 2009, and now, ASOJ have put their own spin on the rock’n’roll hit “as an homage to America’s rock pioneers.”

Just last week, A Shadow of Jaguar dropped an accompanying music video for their version of “Keep on Knocking.” The video features shots of the duo gallivanting around several Boulder hometown haunts, including The Fox Theatre, Dot’s Diner, and The No Name Bar, where Whiskey Autumn’s Matty Schelling actually makes a short cameo appearance. These scenes are interspersed with action shots of a lady friend rocking out, skateboarders, and an ASOJ live performance. Filmed and directed by Colin Anders of Slice Cinematics, you can peep the video for yourself below:

Currently, ASOJ are busy gigging around NYC, but have plans to release more singles for your ears in 2017. Keep up with their tour schedule here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Boulder's Asalott: Exploring Musical Worlds

By: Will Baumgartner

Oh you trancey, huh?

Boulder-based group Asalott (pronounced Ocelot, like the wild cat) is led by the quietly unassuming local genius of the hammered dulcimer, Forrest Lotterhos. The hammered dulcimer, a rarely seen instrument capable of complex patterns of rhythm, melody, and harmony is what Lotterhos composes Asalott’s songs with. The group then takes these compositions and adds some electronics, various acoustic and electric drums, and an electric bass played in an unusual way. The resulting music is like a swirling, sometimes meditative, sometimes ecstatic rhythmic journey to strange and exotic worlds.

Asalott's Forrest Lotterhos behind the hammered dulcimer. 

Asalott's Forrest Lotterhos behind the hammered dulcimer. 

Asalott grew out of a collaboration in 2013 between Lotterhos and drummer Cody Hart (of Boulder funk-rock band Cold River City). Depending mostly on the venue in which they’re performing, their shows range from the quietly introspective to all-out explosions of polyrhythmic dance music. And while they perform in different configurations from duo to trio to quartet, they pack the biggest punch in their full quartet form. So if you’re more into the gentle dreamy feel, catching them as a duo or trio might be more your cup of green tea, but if you really love to dance, best to go to a show where they’ve got the full arsenal going. I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Lotterhos to find out more about Asalott, and their hypnotically irresistible sound.

Forrest- your Facebook page describes your music as "tribal breakbeat". Can you expand on what that term means to you?

Many people ask us what genre of music Asalott is, and that’s a difficult question to answer because of our unique instrumentation. Breakbeat is typically used to describe electronic, trance, or drum and bass music with heavy percussive influence. Three out of four of our instruments are percussion instruments and though we don’t utilize any electronic production, our sound takes on an electronic music feel and a tribal quality with danceable beats, and a trance-like quality with the hammered dulcimer riffs.

Matty Schelling on the beats. 

Matty Schelling on the beats. 

I've been a fan of your hammered dulcimer playing since you used to come into Burnt Toast, the legendary restaurant on the Hill that was home-away-from-home for so many artists, musicians and poets. At that time, you performed solo. How did this project come together as a band, and when? 

I’ve been performing [on the] hammered dulcimer both solo and in various bands in the Boulder and Denver areas since 2008. Burnt Toast was the beginning for me. In 2013 I reconnected with Cody Hart and we began busking on Pearl Street and playing shows as a duo with my hammered dulcimer and his cajon. It was an instant connection and success. We didn’t even have to practice; it came together on the spot. By taking my solo compositions and developing them with Cody’s drum rhythms, [our music] started to take on a new life.

Matty Schelling was a mutual friend and fellow percussionist who joined the group in early 2014, bringing in electronic drum pads and auxiliary percussion. About a month or so after Matty joined us, Joe Braun [came aboard] with his uniquely unhinged bass guitar. Together, the four of us have been playing shows in Boulder since the fall of 2014. We’re still in our early stages, refining our sound and our compositions, but with such eclectic instruments and improvisational roots, we always seem to put on a great show. 

I hear a lot of different styles within the Asalott sound, some of which I can't readily identify. What musical traditions and artists would you say have influenced you most? 

As individuals, we all have different and varying influences, but collectively, we have been influenced by electronic musicians and producers who integrate acoustic sounds and live instruments such as Emancipator, Bonobo, Shigeto, Govinda, and Beats Antique.

Personally, I was influenced at a young age from folk, bluegrass, and old-time music. In my teens I began to listen to a lot of progressive and indie rock bands like The Mars Volta, who utilized complex drum rhythms. In my twenties, I got into listening to and producing electronic and hip-hop music. My hammered dulcimer playing is, at its core, harmonically rich in folk and traditional Irish music and simultaneously rhythmically complex with ever-expanding patterns, taking on a progressive and trance-like persona. I also have to give a shout-out to legendary hammered dulcimer player Jamie Janover, who I saw perform with Zilla back in 2007 and then again at Burning Man in 2009 with Lynx. His integration of live hammered dulcimer with EDM production really inspired me to take my dulcimer playing to another level, and I began to write my own compositions and expand out into playing with different bands and exploring various genres. Needless to say, there is a convergence of many musical styles in Asalott.

Lotterhos, Hart, & Schelling. 

Lotterhos, Hart, & Schelling. 

You've got a great group of players in this project, including drummer Cody Hart of Cold River City and Matty Schelling of Whiskey Autumn. Can you tell me a little about each member, their instruments, and how they fit into the overall sound and feel of Asalott? 

I play the hammered dulcimer, and depending on the show, a Nord synthesizer. The dulcimer is the lead instrument in our band, and most of the compositions center around it. It has a harmonic resonance unlike any instrument, and as a percussion instrument, it sets up the rhythmic cadence for the songs. 

Cody Hart plays two different sized cajons, which are often heard in Flamenco and Afro-Peruvian music. Cody brings a fat bass downbeat and an abundance of rich tones that characterize [his instrument]. Cody closely follows and supports the complex rhythmic patterns of the dulcimer while upping the dance factor. 

Matty Schelling plays electronic drum pads and adds a little vocal flair into the mix. With different Nord percussion synthesizers, Matty is able to add infinite variations of drum sounds. Matty ups the danceability of Asalott with his hip-hop inspired rhythms. Without using computer based production, we are able to achieve a live electronic drum beat that further amps and supports the rhythmic patterns [of our sound].

Joe Braun plays a traveling electric bass that he has rigged to a desk. He he either strums it or uses a viola bow to produce droning, often orchestral sounds. He also provides non-lyrical chanting vocals, using his voice as an instrument in itself. Joe brings and amplifies the contemplative nature of the sound, playing bass lines and singing vocal riffs that hold and lift the dulcimer melodies to another level.

When you play a show, what do you hope the audience will do, feel, and take away from the performance? 

We play shows at a lot of different venues around Boulder. We cater to the space and audience, sometimes deciding to play acoustic duo shows at small venues and coffee shops. When we play larger venues, we bring the whole band and up the energy level. We love when people dance and move to the music. That’s definitely one of our goals [at our shows].

Regardless of the venue or the size of the audience, we all deeply feel that the music we create is heart-expansive at the core and mind-expansive in its complexity. People have told us at shows that our music captivated them in a profound way, sparked feelings of joy, and deepened their connection with themselves and the people around them. We really want people to have a great time: whether they dance, have a spiritual experience, or just chill and listen, we want them to take away an experience that resonates with them and that they remember.

What are your long term plans for Asalott, and what's happening next? 

We recently recorded and are about to release an album of acoustic duo music. It will be six compositions featuring Cody and myself. We also just submitted a video to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest, which was named one of the top ten entries in Colorado.

We are planning to go back into the studio and track out songs with the whole band soon too. That will be a bigger project with more production involved. We want to play festivals this summer and some larger venues in the Boulder and Denver areas by the end of the year.

Tonight, you can catch us at our home-base, The No Name Bar at 10PM.

Details for the show tonight can be found here.

Watch Asalott’s Tiny Desk submission video:

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Catching Up with Whiskey Autumn: Fireworks, #MusicMasquerade, & R&B Jams

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Boulder's Whiskey Autumn are bringing new tunes to this Saturday's Music Masquerade.

We’re just two days away from our #MusicMasquerade with Whiskey Autumn, Villain Baritone featuring Andrew Sturtz and Hunter Stone, and Noctogon at Studio 700! Want the event details? Then peep the FB event here. This week, we’ve already brought you features on both the boys of Villain Baritone and the prog/alt rock trio that is Boulder’s Noctogon. Give those a read if you haven’t yet kids.

Today, we’re talkin’ Whiskey Autumn, the headliner of Saturday’s bill. This indie, doo-wop rock trio comprised of Greg Laut (vocals/guitar/keys), David Landry (bass/vocals), and Matty Schelling (drums, vocals) have been up to some pretty sweet thangs as of late:

They dropped this badass video for their single 07.04.07:

And they released 07.04.07 for free download and your listening pleasure:

You might notice that 07.04.07 has more R&B and pop undertones than some of Whiskey Autumn’s previous work, and that’s the sort of sound the band has been experimenting with most recently. Said frontman Greg Laut:

I had grown a bit tired of the Americana vibe of our previous two EP’s so writing from a R&B/pop perspective felt very refreshing. The recording process for 07.04.07 was interesting because we chopped up and sampled the beat in a similar manner to what a hip hop producer might do and incorporated some electronic elements. We’re constantly pushing to further develop our sound and explore new ideas. The song is certainly a sign of things to come in the near future.

The three-piece have written several other songs in this new vein, one of which they just filmed a live video performance for with Ian Glass Media (who also filmed 07.04.07). They plan to drop that video sometime in February, along with a live performance video of a popular R&B cover that you’ve probably seen them play at one of their recent shows.

A scene from 07.04.07.

A scene from 07.04.07.

Whiskey Autumn is also heading back into the studio over the next couple of months with plans for a new EP release in the late summer or early fall of 2016 Want to check out their previous EPs? Head here.

When we asked the WA boys what they’re most excited about for Saturday’s #MusicMasquerade, they told us this:

We’re really looking forward to playing a rocking, DIY venue like Studio 700. Plus everyone will be wearing masquerade masks so it will feel like we are in Eyes Wide Shut. Fingers crossed that Tom Cruise will dig our sound.

So there you have it Boulder! Come see Whiskey Autumn close out the night at Studio 700 this Saturday! Join the FB event righhhht here. And don’t forget your mask...

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See This Holiday Weekend (11/27 & 11/28)

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s a holiday weekend and there are some shows to explore as sweet as the pumpkin pie you nommed yesterday. Check ‘em out:

Today (Friday, 11/27)

Wildwood Roots at The Jamestown Mercantile Cafe Co. 6PM-Close

It’s hard to think of a better way to spend your holiday weekend than with the awesome regulars of the Merc. And tonight the Wildwood Roots will be providing “acoustic nectar for your ears.” The duo will be laying down some swooning originals and a few covers that are sure to make everyone headed to this mountain town dance the night away. The snowy drive is always worth it. Make the trek. And peep a track here:

Asalott with Gypsee at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

Asalott. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Asalott. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Asalott is bringing their Middle Eastern beat trance back to The No Name tonight and it’s gonna be a rad time. Their combination of Forrest Lotterhos on hammered dulcimer, Matty Schelling on his Octpad and Cody Hart on cajon is hypnotizing. Plus Gypsee is in town aka Boulder musician turned world traveler Will Buck. He’s been recording new tracks at The Crucible Recording Studio all week, so if you’re lucky, maybe he’ll lay one down for you tonight. Word on the street is he’s going to be jammin’ some flamenco-style guitar playing. Head out. And watch Asalott live here:

Tomorrow (Saturday, 11/14)

Ben Gallagher, Ben Hanna, & Brian Esau at The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse 8PM-Close

Ben Gallagher.

Ben Gallagher.

We’re dubbing this one the three Bs. Ben Gallagher is a Boulder-based singer/songwriter who “writes from the gut. . . and plays from the heart.” He’s been involved in a number of local projects over the years, but tonight he’s playing you some of his solo work. He’s self-produced two full albums, which you can listen to here. Oh Ben Hanna, how we love him so. We’ve brought you quite a bit of info on him lately, and you can read more here. Let him smirk his way into your cold heart tonight. And finally there’s, Brian Esau, a talented musician who will be playing you lots of original songs on guitar, sitar, and banjo. Check out his work (some of it with Ben Gallagher) here. And stream Ben Gallagher's album Heart Shaped Rocks here:

The Casino Effect at The Dark Horse 930PM-Close

We said it before and we’ll say it again: The Dark Horse somehow always has acts we’ve never heard of, can rarely find much info on, and somehow, the bands are unusually awesome to watch live. Here’s to hoping The Casino Effect are one such band, as we can’t find a single thing about them to share. So go get weird! Experiment! And report back to us…

Tallgrass at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

The gentleman of tallgrass.

The gentleman of tallgrass.

What have you been missing this holiday weekend? The stomping-ground sounds of Tallgrass, Fort Collins’ dirty soul trio. They claim to be “raised by wolves, taught by squirrels, and enemy of the owl.” How’s that for you Boulder? Sounds like it will be a great time, and this is the band’s only Boulder show before they set off on a Colorado tour. So go get at ‘em! And check out their video for "So Blind" here: 

Both Nights (11/27 & 11/28)

Leftover Salmon at The Boulder Theater 830PM-Close

Leftover Salmon.

Leftover Salmon.

Formed in Boulder in 1989, Leftover Salmon have become a Colorado staple, especially in the world of bluegrass. Their rootsy sounds have kept even the coldest Colorado mountain towns warm on blizzardy nights over the years. And this weekend, they’re returning to Boulder to celebrate 25 years in the slamgrass game with all of you. They have an extensive tour planned over the next few months, which you can peep here. But we recommend catching them while you can this weekend- get your tickets in advance here. Watch a live Leftover Salmon performance:

There are our picks for your Thanksgiving Weekend Boulder! Go work off your feast and hop to 'em!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Band of Brothers: A Sit-Down with Whiskey Autumn

By: Pete Laffin

Whiskey Autumn are all about their art.

WA. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

WA. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

I had the great pleasure of sitting down last week with Whiskey Autumn, a band I enjoy and admire, for an in-depth chat. They're headlining The Fall Showcase tomorrow night. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did:

I’ve been a fan of Whiskey Autumn for awhile. What I’ve always been impressed by since the first time I saw you guys is that the aesthetic you present isn’t based on a current “in” trend. Often, newly-formed bands put their finger in the air to see which way the wind is blowing: “I know, let’s start a new-grass band with a Fleet Foxes twist!” Rather, you guys settled into an aesthetic that’s very much not “in,” namely first-wave British Invasion. That’s what it looks like, what it sounds like; from your originals, to your covers, to the way David and Greg knock their heads around in your music video like a couple of Beatles bobble-head dolls. It’s very bold to go against the grain, but it’s even bolder to pick something so far from the norm. How did the three of you individually contribute toward defining this aesthetic?

Greg: That’s an interesting question. I guess it wasn’t a conscious decision to go toward or against a trend. We were all big Beatles fans. We all had the vinyl. It was the way we first bonded.

David: Greg already had Whiskey Autumn going before we met. Then we found Matty, and it was just one of those things: What do we all listen to? What do you we like? Because that’s going to be the fun stuff to cover. Being a band in Boulder, we have to play three-hour sets.

Matty: We’re not a jam band.

Thank god.

Greg: One of the first covers we honed in on was “Wouldn’t it Be Nice” by The Beach Boys.

Matty: Which is not an easy song. If you have the balls to play any Beach Boys song to begin with, that one isn’t high on the list. You need multiple strong vocalists.

Greg: And from a songwriting perspective, it’s incredible how quick the movements come in that song. It’s almost a classical piece in that way. We were really drawn to that. And especially on our first EP, we wanted to play some doo-wop.

Laffin with the Whiskey Autumn boys. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Laffin with the Whiskey Autumn boys. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

That’s the other direction you guys go: Motown. And while the subgenres aren’t the same, they happened within the same few years.

Matty: The one thing we all could definitely agree on was the music we would listen to when we were hanging out, which was Hard Day’s Night or Pet Sounds or Rubber Soul. For all of us, that era shines above everything else.

That’s really strange. That’s a very specific subset of music for three players to run with in this day and age. It must be daunting to think you are attempting to repave a way that has already passed. Your originals reflect this era, too. In light of this, what does success look like to you guys? A week from today? A month? A year? What are the expectations for pushing something no one knows they are looking for?

Greg: The success is making the art.

Matty: Great songs speak for themselves, regardless of the genre.

Couldn’t agree more with that.

Matty: Whether you’re reaching for one aesthetic or another, if the melody is strong and the lyrics are strong, it’s timeless. You can still listen to “Be My Baby” and it sounds just as fresh and magical as it did the first time you heard it when The Ronnettes put it out. In the studio, we just want our songs to be the best they can be.

So is that success to you guys? Making the best song you can make? Does moving up in the industry have anything to do with it?

Greg: I find the joy in the creating. That’s when I feel like we’re doing the real shit. It’s also a beautiful thing not having to answer to anybody, which we don’t right now, outside of budget constraints. The art is what lives on. Live shows are super important, but creating the records is where it’s really at. That’s what will live on.

Matty: The band has grown from a bedroom-folk thing to more of a rock band, and I come from a hip-hop background playing with DJs. We are always trying to build on what we know. It’s like advancing in math, always trying to solve more complicated riddles.

Behind the scenes of Whiskey Autumn's newest music video. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Behind the scenes of Whiskey Autumn's newest music video. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Having played here for a few years, what do you make of the Boulder scene?

David: The Boulder scene is different than the one I grew up in.

Where did you grow up?

David: Dallas. Downtown there were fifteen venues with three or four band bills and everyone supported and watched each other. If you played the nine o’clock slot, you would go over to another bar to support another band that had the midnight slot. Here it’s like, damn, we have to play three hours and be on every fucking song the whole night. Where I came from you got forty-five minute slots where you played the best songs you could in that time. Being here is like being a glorified bar band where you are in the background a lot and noise cancelling.

Do you think that’s because of a shortage of acts here?

Matty: It’s a shortage of venues.

David: That’s why we are working with other artists and BolderBeat trying to create a mid-level venue over at The Riverside.

Greg: You have The Fox or The Boulder Theater, but you have to build up a lot before you can get there.

Right, you have to be invited into the kingdom. Moving on: nostalgia and sentiment. Two very unhip things you also make hip.

Greg: Why thank you.

Everything you play, especially the songs you write, seem to be reaching back in time. Not just the aesthetic, but the lyrics, the mood of the sound.

Greg: I’m always trying to draw on things that happen to me, to think of them in scenes and tell a story. I’m trying to make a song out of the picture in my head that I see of the past. After you have had some time to think about things, you can understand them better. You put them through a different filter. You write a song about it and really understand what happened.

Band of Brothers. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Band of Brothers. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

In order to live together and be in a band together, you guys must get along pretty well.

Matty: There are times we want to punch each other in the face.

David: It’s gotten to brotherhood.

Matty: We have this family dynamic. We aren’t competing. We are a family and we want to do what is good for the family name.

David: Exactly. These guys are my brothers. I want them to be honest with me. Letting them down is worse than hurting yourself.

Matty: This has definitely been something different for me. It’s been very exciting. I was asked if I could fill in at first, which makes you more present. Count to four, count to six; whichever time signature we’re playing in. Stay in the pocket, keep it simple. I went into this thinking I was just filling in, which I love, even if it’s in a scene I’m not really into. It’s going to bring something new out of me. You just make a choice that it will be fun. And here we are nearly three years later, a repertoire of ninety songs we can play together, always having new musical ideas to bounce off one another. I could not have envisioned this is what it would become.

Check out the Whiskey Autumn trio this Friday at The Riverside where they are headlining The Fall Showcase. More details here.

Join the FB event here.

-Pete

All photos per Hannah OreskovichThis interview was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat. 

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See This Hallo-weekend!

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s time for Hallo-weekend!! Let’s do this:

Today (Friday, 10/30)

Haunted Fest Rage Time.

Haunted Fest Rage Time.

CU’s Haunted Fest at Balch Fieldhouse 8PM-???

We’ll be covering press tonight at Program Council’s Haunted Fest! Come hang with us in your costumes and let’s rage with Porter Robinson, Sound Remedy, Minnesota,Exmag, and Ananda. Two tiers of tickets have already sold out, but whether you’re a student or not, you can still get tix here. And in the meantime, we’ve put together a playlist to get you pumped for the show. Listen to it here.

Booster.

Booster.

Booster Halloween Extravaganza at Under The Sun 9PM-Close

If you didn’t already see our feature on Booster this week, you better read it here. These guys are kickin’ it tonight at Under The Sun with a costume contest + free prizes. Drummer Mike Lehman promises “it’s going to be EPIC.” We can’t wait to go groove with them! They’ve been working on a Funk Opera. Let’s go.

Band of Lovers.

Band of Lovers.

Theresa Peterson & Band of Lovers at Johnny’s Cigar Bar 9PM-Close

Band of Lovers are passing through town this Halloweekend and Boulder’s own Theresa Peterson will be playing an awesome show with them tonight! Head over to Johnny’s for a nice glass of whiskey and some great folk pop sounds. Don’t forget to wear your costume! It’s gonna be a trick or treatingly fun performance.

it's midnight.

it's midnight.

The Midnight Strange at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

There have been many rumors circulating on tonight’s show behind the big brown door. Zombies, Jim Morrison’s hologram, and possibly even some of the members of The Almond Butters have been rumored to be there. What are you in for? We don’t know. But it’s bound to be a ghoulish time.

Tomorrow (Saturday, 10/31)

the masked men of augustus.

the masked men of augustus.

Huge Haunted Halloween Hootenanny at Studio 700 8PM-Close

There are two bands gracing the Studio 700 space tomorrow in full costumed glory: Boulder’s Augustus and Hunter Stone & The Grumpy ol’ Man. There will be a costume contest, and for $5 you can booze all night with all proceeds supporting Studio 700 and both bands. Sounds like a seriously good time! Roll out.

the whiskey boys.

the whiskey boys.

Whiskey Autumn at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

The Whiskey Autumn boys are back at The No Name Bar tomorrow night and rumored to be bringing the Mario Bros. to the stage. They’ll fight off Goombas and Koopa Troopas with guitars and Matty Schelling’s Octapad. Get out the way! Head to the bar on your Hill-hopping journey for a hauntingly good performance. Never a cover; always a good time.

See you around Halloweenies.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend... Eight? Eight Shows To See 08/28 & 08/29, Boulder.

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s Friday once again and there is so much awesome music happening this weekend that we couldn’t pick just six. So here’s our weekend… eight? Peep it:

Today (Friday 08/28)

shafer.

shafer.

Danny Shafer at Pearl St. Pub 5PM-??

Danny’s doing a sweet double dose of shows the next two nights. Catch him at The Pub tonight or NedFest tomorrow. You can peep his music here. And don’t forget that Shafer’s CD Release Show (Paul Kimbiris is opening the event!) is less than a month away, and you can buy tickets here. You’ve got to make it to at least one of these Shafer performances. Seriously.

the booster boys. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

the booster boys. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Booster and Realtalk at The Lazy Dog 8PM-Close

We first fell for Booster here. These guys always bring a good time! Their funky jams will have you dancin’, and they told us Boulder-based Realtalk will be starting the party off right with some rockin’ tracks. We dig the LD’s stage setup, and their dancefloor was made for a show like this. Go groove.

emily and her kurzweil. PHOTO CREDIT:    HANNAH ORESKOVICH

emily and her kurzweil. PHOTO CREDIT: HANNAH ORESKOVICH

Emily Shreve CD Release Show at The Mercury Cafe 10PM-Close

We just brought you a feature on Shreve’s latest EP Bliss and Gravity last week. Check out her music here, but head to this show if you want to hear her latest. Her howling vocals and love for her Kurzweil will take you on a trippy dream that you’re not sure you want to wake up from. This show is the worth the drive, Boulder. Head down to the D.

wa jammin. PHOTO CREDIT:    HANNAH ORESKOVICH

wa jammin. PHOTO CREDIT: HANNAH ORESKOVICH

Whiskey Autumn at The No Name Bar 10pm-Close

This indie doo-wop rock trio has recently thrown some amazing R&B and hip-hop influences into their usual mix. If you haven’t seen WA drummer Matty Schelling break sticks on his Octapad, then you'd better roll up to the bar with no name tonight. Things will be bumpin’ behind the big brown door. PS: Rumor has it Jeff Vescuso (Natural Motives, The Almond Butters) will be opening this show. Leggo. 

Tomorrow (Saturday 08/29)

the foxfeather ladies. polaroid: becky guidera

the foxfeather ladies. polaroid: becky guidera

Foxfeather at Vindication Brewing 4PM-Close

The good thing about our list of Saturday shows is that you can hop from one to the next. Start at Vindication for a brew and Boulder’s folk outfit Foxfeather. Their upbeat tunes will get your night going. They’re playing shows all over Colorado this fall, so catch a Boulder gig while you still can.

Augustus' new ep. 

Augustus' new ep. 

Augustus CD Release Show at The Lazy Dog 8PM-Close

We recently reviewed Augustus’ EP Into Frames, and long story short, we liked what we heard. Tomorrow is their highly anticipated CD Release Show at the LD, and we can’t wait! Bloodbath live? Yes please. Andddd Paul Kimbiris is opening this CD release show as well. So excited.

the longest day of the year has another fox show soon.

the longest day of the year has another fox show soon.

The Longest Day of the Year at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub 10PM-Close

The Longest Day of the Year will be hosting a dance party of fun at Conor’s tomorrow. Get boozed, get yo dancin’ shoes, and go jump around with this Boulder-based Americana band. They’re opening a show at the Fox in less than a month, which you can get tickets to here. Check ‘em out.

NedFest

And finally, just a short drive away, NedFest is happening this weekend. Some of our favorites on the lineup include Gipsy Moon, Gasoline Lollipops, Danny Shafer, The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, and Caribou Mountain Collective. You can peep the full lineup and schedule here. Head to the party.

So seriously Boulder: Get out this weekend and catch a show. With this many options, you have no choice but to have a rad, bumpin’ time. TGIF.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Seven Shows to See If You're Not Going to The UMS This Weekend

By: Hannah Oreskovich

The UMS is arguably the biggest thing happening in Colorado music this weekend. But if you aren’t throwing your hands up down in Denver, these are the seven shows to see near the Boulder bubble this weekend:

Tonight (Friday 07/24):

Theresa Peterson & Hunter Stone at Vindication Brewing 530-9PM

These two Boulder-based singer songwriters are behind the monthly Boulder-in-the-Round event at Vapor Distillery. We covered it back in June here. Aside from that, both of them are super talented solo artists. In recent months, they’ve been collaborating together, so this is a performance that is worth checking out. Head on over after work!

Augustus at The Roost 6PM-Close

Augustus recently dropped their EP Into Frames and are planning a release show next month. But if you want to hear their latest songs live before their party takes over Pearl in August, then roll to The Roost and give them a listen.

That's one Cold River.

That's one Cold River.

Cold River Autumn at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

Boulder-based Cold River City, who are incidentally also on The UMS lineup this weekend, have some members playing a show here tonight with guest drummer Matty Schelling from Whiskey Autumn. In a super-group formation of sorts, the sounds from behind the brown door are bound to be awesome. Be sure to stop in!

Tomorrow (Saturday 07/25):

Danny Shafer at Oskar Blues CyclHOPS 730PM-Close

Danny is a big name in Colorado music. It’s probably harder to find a night that he isn’t playing music than one that he is. He’s played just about every venue around the state, and he always puts on a great show. He occasionally brings along talented friends to share the stage, so make the drive here to see what he has in store for this performance!

Da Z Boys.

Da Z Boys.

Zolopht at Oskar Blues Homemade Liquids and Solids 830PM-Close

Are you one of those classic Coloradans who loves reggae, blues, rock, and bluegrass combined into one sound? Then this band is for you! The Zolopht boys hail from Grand Junction, CO and are currently playing a number of shows around these parts. We’ve been seeing their name a lot recently, so we checked out their dancy beats, which you can listen to here. Go peep their show!

Bonnis.

Bonnis.

Andrew Bonnis at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

Bonnis is a Boulder-based musician of many talents. He is an amazing solo performer, but has also been in a number of successful group projects. Most recently, he’s been playing guitar in Nederland’s Gipsy Moon band, but this is your chance to see what he has up his sleeve solo. He won’t disappoint, so check him out!

Whiskey Autumn at Conor O’Neill’s 1030PM-Close

Rumor has it that Whiskey Autumn are currently back in the studio working on a new project. Maybe they’ll surprise you with a hint of what they’re up to at this show, so it’s one you don’t want to miss! Go dance with these boys! 

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The No Name Bar Has Live Music Almost Every Night

By: Hannah Oreskovich

There are always new tunes behind the big brown door.

Like we mentioned in our Laughing Goat feature yesterday, this week we’re trying to bring you local venues where you can find a performance any night of the week. Today, we want to talk to you about a place with no name. I’ve heard people refer to it as “the brown door” or “the secret bar”. It’s a place of many names and none at all: The No Name Bar.

The Door.

The Door.

The No Name is one of our most favorite of all Boulder hangouts. It’s where musicians go to support and be inspired by other musicians. It’s where you go to sip a great glass of whiskey while chatting with other creatives; or sit in silence enjoying the sounds. It’s atmosphere is unlike anywhere else we’ve been in good ‘ol Boulder. It’s arguably the beating heart of the local music scene.

The No Name Bar has three nights of themed music every week. Mondays are Bluegrass, Tuesdays are Swing, and Wednesdays are Jazz. The Boulder Swing Collective often performs on Tuesdays, Fleedami or a cluster of jazz musicians perform Wednesdays, & Mondays are also a variation of skilled instrumentalists bringing you dancey bluegrass jams. So drop in to check one of these out, or pick a night to religiously attend every week. Either way, you’ll always be impressed by the talent here.

Lovin' dat bass Mangrovers.

Lovin' dat bass Mangrovers.

The rest of the week, various bands play the bar. This Thursday is Mitchel Evan and The Mangrove, a folk-rock-americana trio from Boulder. They promise “tasteful harmonies” and “powerful lyrics.” They’re a band we haven’t had the chance to see live yet, but they definitely sound worth checking out.

Friday is the reunion show of Boulder’s Almond Butters band. The Almond Butters are a supergroup of sorts. Their members are all involved in other projects (Moonwavve, Natural Motives, and Bareface), but perform under aliases for this band. So frontman Jebediah Almond will be on bass, Daryl Almond will be tickling the keys, Leo Garetti will hold down lead guitar, and Jean du le Monde will be on drums. Come to the show to uncover their true identities and listen to them bring “outlaw indie, in-law country” and a seriously good time to the bar. Though their shows are few and far between, they always put on a wildly energetic live performance. We’ll be covering their event on Friday and snapping pics, so come dance with us!

The Butter Boys.

The Butter Boys.

Saturday is still TBA, so we will update this article accordingly once announced.

Sundays rarely have music. However, Matty Schelling of Whiskey Autumn bartends Sundays and a conversation with him is as awesome as any band you would roll in to check out. He’s extremely knowledgeable on all things music (truly it’s astonishing), he books all of The No Name music, and he’ll pour you an awesome IPA to sip on while you talk hip-hop influences. Skip church and pay Matty a Sunday visit.

That’s The No Name for the week! We’re featuring a video launch tomorrow, but Thursday we’ll bring you another Nightly Music Venue Feature. Keep groovin’ Boulder.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Keeping It Underground: The Spacement

By: Hannah Oreskovich

DIY feels good.

There are geodes on the tables, tapestries on the walls, and hammocks for seating in the back. There’s a makeshift bar to your left, easels on the right, and Christmas lights illuminate the ‘stage.’ The vibe is relaxed, with a hint of psychedelia. Where are you? The Spacement.

The Spacement is a new music venue to Boulder, and one that you can’t actually find without the whole “know someone who knows someone” thing. It’s invite-only, and if you’re looking to play there, you’d better be good.

Says the owner, “I want this place to be known for good music. I’m not just letting anyone book here. I am hand-picking [the ones] that I think best fit the space.”

Shrowded in mystery: The Spacement. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Shrowded in mystery: The Spacement. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

So who played when I attended? Boulder-based Natural Motives and friends + Asalott. Natural Motives original members Chris Ruiz and Kevin Ritch blended sounds with their newest member, bassist Jeff Vescuso, and guest drummer Gaines Green of Boulder Sound Lab. The guys opened their show with several jammy, jazz-rock numbers. And as the four-piece grooved along, Ruiz sprinkled us with mellow vocals and the boys brought in some reggae undertones for their dancier beats. You wouldn’t know this collective hadn’t played much together; each is so talented instrumentally that together they brought us strong, sleek funk. And as cool as the hammocks were, Natural Motives and friends definitely got the crowd swaying.

Natural Motives in Silhouette. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Natural Motives in Silhouette. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Which brings us to Asalott. I first saw these guys perform at the No Name Bar a few months ago and was instantly intrigued by Forrest Lotterhos’ hammered dulcimer playing. It’s like a piano/harp/mandolin/drum thanggg all in one. It’s awesome. And Lotterhos played it with an energetic ease that was magnetizing to watch. Lotterhos also threw down on the keys, depending on the song. Meanwhile, Cody Hart of Cold River City and Matty Schelling of Whiskey Autumn each brought their own badass beats to the Asalott mix. Hart was atop the cojóne while Schelling built electronic swells on his Roland Octapad and Roland TD6. Together, the trio constructed trancy downtempo pieces that pulled you in and didn’t let go. There was a Middle Eastern vibe to the sound with the dulcimer in the mix, but Schelling also brought us a hip-hop style pulse. It was impossible not to move along with their sound.

Asalott bringing beats. Photo Credit:   Hannah Oreskovich

Asalott bringing beats. Photo Credit: Hannah Oreskovich

Beyond live performances, the owner of The Spacement told us that they want to record shows “with a radio-quality sound.” They have diamond sound boards scattered throughout the walls of the venue and behind the tapestries, they’ve also insulated the room for recording purposes.

Overall, the underground vibe of this place rocked. And they’re only looking to make the space more creatively cool as time goes on.

Said the owner, “I want people live-painting during shows. I want nightly themed performances: jazz, jamtronica, reggae. I want to track live shows and release them. We’re making something different here.”

Different, secret, psychedelic. I can dig.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Whiskey Waves: Whiskey Autumn's Call You Mine Release Show a Success

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Whiskey flowed in more ways than one this weekend at Whiskey Autumn's Call You Mine EP Release Show.

Whiskey Autumn's Latest EP:  Call You Mine .  

Whiskey Autumn's Latest EP: Call You Mine.
 

Picture this: A stage dripping in deep blue and sea-green lighting, three talented acts pulling you closer to their sets with every melody like a gentle tide, and an ever-building swell of sound that eventually erupts into a full-on wave of a dance party. That’s how I spent my Saturday night last weekend at the Whiskey Autumn album release show at the Riverside in Boulder, CO. And if you weren’t there Boulder, you should have been.

Let’s start with the venue: The bands performed at the Riverside in a room that held over 200 people for a good part of the night, making it the mid-size venue that Boulder desperately needs for bands who have a following greater than the Pearl Street bars can hold, and who are just a step away from headlining the 625-person capacity that the historic Fox Theatre provides. Patrons drank the bar dry (insert irony of lack of whiskey at a Whiskey Autumn gig), and the interior added to the sea-vibes of the show, with colorful light splashes dangling from what looked like strands of choral on the ceiling’s stringy centerpiece. The Riverside proved a surprisingly prodigious spot for Boulder bands, and I hope more will take note and start forming its space into the weekend spot it ought to be.

The author with Whiskey Autumn frontman   Greg Laut  . Blue polaroid courtesy Becky Guidera.

The author with Whiskey Autumn frontman Greg Laut. Blue polaroid courtesy Becky Guidera.

And now for the music: First on the bill was FoxFeather, a Boulder-based folky, alt-country five-piece fronted by two lady vocalists. Together, Laura Paige Stratton and Carly Ricks Smith filled our ears with sultry lulls, twangy verses, and bouncy harmonies that set the energy for what would ultimately turn into a rockin’ evening. One of the biggest treats of their performance had to be Patrick Coleman’s phat, wavy slaps on his stand-up bass (because do those ever lose their cool factor?). He brought in a jazzy undertone that rightfully demanded its own attention. FoxFeather released an EP last fall, Foul Moon, which is definitely worth checking out. You can see their list of upcoming live shows here.

Augustus took the stage next and splashed us with an awesome foot-stomping, banjo-bumping performance. These dudes brought some serious originality to the popular Americana movement, from their catchy kick North to the dark, plucky perfection of Shadows and Tails. But above all, my personal favorite was Spoke of This Before, where frontman Colin Kelly commanded an emotional hum of heavy, raw vocals. It’s woeful reflectiveness created an energized hush. And when the banjo, guitar, and cello joined hands in the latter part of the song, the persuasive power of this trio was evident in the bluesy, gritty vibe that gripped our shoulders. Jim Hurlihy showcased his skills on a variety of instruments (sometimes multiple at a time) and Jesse Wright moved with his cello as though they were one, fluid being. Peep their show schedule here.

Whiskey Autumn set list from the night.

Whiskey Autumn set list from the night.

Headliner Whiskey Autumn opened with their track June, charming the at-capacity showroom with pop harmonies dripping in buzzy guitar riffs and prancy piano parts. Following June, WA proceeded to play their full four-song Call You Mine EP which you can stream here. Hips were jiving when bassist David Landry summoned a deep, dirty funk opening for A Fool’s Errand and frontman Greg Laut kept us spinning with his hypnotic guitar solo in Turn the Key (Let it Roll) (personal favorite on the EP). These guys can make you move. The trio floated on with several unreleased songs and catchy number Call Me Out written by guest guitarist Robbie Steifel. I wish I could link you to some of these jams, but in this case you had to be there (here’s my shameless beg for a recording of Gold Rush and Grin WA dudes). Halfway through the set, the boys wrapped us in an unexpected undercurrent of energy when drummer Matty Schelling’s Octapad erupted unapologetic and deep hip-hop beats for the band’s original 07.04.07 and for the crowd-pleasing cover of Frank Ocean's Thinking About You. Greg Laut’s smooth and varying vocal range then somersaulted us into some familiar melodies from the band’s first EP Into Something New where everyone sang along to the fan-favorite Born Again.

In what made for a wildly enjoyable and ever-changing collaborative effort, the boys had a number of special guests throughout the course of their set: Robbie Stiefel on guitar, Crucible Recording Studio owner Andy McEwen on piano, Colin Kelly of Augustus on guitar, Andrew McNew on trumpet, and Ryan O’Malley of HelicopterBearShark on saxophone. These additions allowed the three-piece to build strong sonorific swells and also showcased the true beauty of the Boulder music scene: creative artists blending talents for the love of original sound in more than just their living rooms. The trio’s closing Jackson Five cover of I Want You Back burst into a full-on boogie, followed by their encore performance of the you-have-to-sing-along Ronnettes Be My Baby. With their dreamy harmonies, inventive lyricism, and alluring instrumentalism, I’d sail on whiskey waves with these guys any night. Get yourself to one of these Whiskey Autumn shows.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.