Race To Neptune Are Either the Black Sheep of Fort Collins or It's Next Big Thing

By: Brody Coronelli

With a new lineup, the band’s heavy, technical, and invigorating new EP Abandon Fashion showcases their evolution as a band, and what sets them aside from their counterparts.

Race To Neptune.

Race To Neptune.

With a spellbing conceptual precision that blends scuzzy ‘90s grunge-rock, darkwave, and the teeth-kicking emotional thunder of punk in a manner that makes heads bang, dice tumble, and PA systems growl, Race to Neptune are one of Fort Collins’ loudest, eclectic, and ferocious rock bands.

The band made their debut in 2016 with Oh Contraire, an album that had a few moments of brazen, fiery chargings into up-tempo punk-rock, but for the most part stayed on the melodic side, using dark, midtempo, and gritty instrumentation to surround frontman Brian Maier’s personal and biting lyrics in a shadowy glow. On the Thurston Moore-reminiscent “Wanderlilly,” the guitars are loud and fiery, but immensely tasteful and bright as the band uses a catchy refrain and echoing harmonies to guide the song into a warm resonance. The song is forceful and delicate all at once; a balance the band had no issue finding on that album.

On their new EP Abandon Fashion, the band has kept the technical sensibilities of their debut intact, making use of raw, punkish energy to play their eclectic and progressive brand of rock’n’roll. Many of the songs have a raw and thundering approach that takes more after punk-rock than it does from brazen, technical, and melodic broods through the dimly lit streets of Oh Contraire. These songs aim to ignite, but not in a typical four-chord punk rock fashion. The band uses this driving energy and delivers it with an array of sonic intricacies in a way that’s more indicative of artists like Jack White, Black Sabbath, and Queens of The Stone Age rather than Subhumans or The Germs.

“I think [Abandon Fashion] is a two word statement that almost signifies that we are going to write, record, and do what we want and how we want, no matter what is cool, trendy, or ‘in fashion’,” says frontman Brian Maier.

The whole EP was cut live at Stout Studios in Fort Collins, capturing a raw and forthright energy that often can’t be found when meticulously multi-tracking or chasing the perfect take. This raw approach, balanced with the driving and aggressive nature of the songs makes Abandon Fashion a fierce, unrelenting pleasure.

“I honestly have always wanted to [record the way we did on this record] because it captures the aggressiveness and raw energy of how we actually sound that can’t be faked. I think if we recorded the first album the same way those songs would have come across just as heavy. Track by track recording is so dialed in and precise in every way from the smallest turn of an amp or pedal knob to how hard we strum or hit a drum or cymbal. This was total freedom and we recorded this just how we practice and this is how we sound live, because it is!” says frontman Brian Maier.

The opening track “Mortal Melody” features a nearly two-minute chugging intro with guitars that gradually grow more jagged, and pummelling drums that grow fiercer with each strike. The song is a garage-driven excursion that has all the thrill of driving down an empty desert highway going fifty over the speed limit. “I’ll be your creature/Can you teach me to teach/Sing to me slowly/In a motor melody,” Maier sings with a quiet growl on top of a scuzzy and aggressive bassline.

The Sonic Youth and Modest Mouse inspired “Departure” follows, a scuzzy rocker with a chanting, harmonic, and arena rock-reminiscent chorus. “Sunsets” is an older song of Maier’s that resurfaced while the band was tracking the album. With a beachy, sunburnt instrumental that feels like a long drive by the coast and lyrics about running off to California, it’s a bright and infectious song by a band that often defaults to the shadows.

The closing track “Abandon Fashion” is a return to form for the band. The entirely instrumental song opens with a fit of siren-esque picking, only to devolve into a showdown of fiery, circling guitars that get more aggressive with every note. What starts out capturing a warm sunset quickly starts to resemble a sky littered with flames, dancing down to the ground.

The album artwork for  Abandon Fashion .

The album artwork for Abandon Fashion.

In more ways than one, Abandon Fashion marks a new beginning for the band. Not only is it a step into new musical territory, but the band underwent two significant lineup changes before making it. With Matt Petersen now on drums and Matt McNear on bass, the band’s sound is shifting in a different direction. Their influences are made loud and clear, and their presences melding with Maier’s technical and anthemic songwriting have led to Race of Neptune’s most invigorating record so far.

“I think it has been a pretty seamless transition,” says Petersen. “We got comfortable together really quickly. Matt just came on as bassist late February and we were in the studio the first week of April. I think that's definitely a testament to our cohesiveness. [Matt and I] both have a strong jazz background with our instruments which allows us to keep time really well while getting out of the rhythmic box bass and drums can sometimes be confined to in rock music. We are also all involved in the writing process… it’s a very cumulative sound you’re hearing.”

Race to Neptune underwent a quick evolution on Abandon Fashion, and for the better. It’s an invigorating, technical, and fun record that sets the band at the forefront of Fort Collins’ music scene. This doesn’t mean that they aren’t outliers, though. In a scene dominated by folk, EDM, and bluegrass, Race to Neptune are a shining beacon of musical progression and experimentation run through a filter of loud, raw, and eclectic rock.

“There has been a little increase in rock bands and venues in the [Fort Collins] area which is nice, but we are still the black sheep of the music scene up here. It is still very much dominated by jam bands, DJs and bluegrass, but we are trying very hard to support other local rock bands as well,” Maier says.

When the musical cohesiveness, energy, and vision of a band like Race To Neptune are all working together, maybe being the black sheep isn’t a bad thing; maybe it’s a sign that they’re at a the forefront of new sound and identity for Northern Colorado. It’s too early to say, but considering how far they’ve come as a band on only two records, anything is possible.

Abandon Fashion is out now. You can keep up with Race to Neptune here.

-Brody

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Vermillion Road Celebrate Newest EP With Packed Show At Lost Lake

By: Nathan Sheppard

Denver band Vermillion Road recently released Escape, their first EP in the last three years. To celebrate, the band played an intimate show at Lost Lake this past Friday. They were joined by Right Before Rain, Sophie Music, and Creature Canopy for support.

Vermillion Road. 

Vermillion Road. 

Lost Lake was buzzing even before Vermillion Road took the stage, and the guys were able to channel that energy into their amazing performance. Frontman Will Robinson is a showman through and through, and he was able to get the crowd hyped either singing along or dancing with each song. While it was only about a 45-minute set, it was still a solid one where everyone had a great time. It was the perfect way for Vermillion Road to introduce everyone to Escape.

Escape is a six-song pop-rock EP that encapsulates the bands new direction from their previous rock roots. The opening track “Gasoline” is a fun, upbeat love song that will definitely get stuck in you head. Halfway through is “Eye On You,” where you can hear the influence of bands like Imagine Dragons or OneRepublic. The song combines the right amount of rock with a touch of electronic beats. Escape gives you everything that we like from Vermillion Road and adds a little experimentation which will catch your attention. It’s the perfect record to jam to anytime of the day and will have you listening on repeat.

Keep up with Vermillion Road and grab their new EP here.

-Nathan

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.


We's Us' Newest EP Was Recorded at Jake Cinninger of Umphrey's McGee's Studio

By: Will Baumgartner

Denver has always been a great town for rock, and the powerhouse quartet known as We’s Us are busy proving that tradition is still alive and well. Their recent EP Zeus is the latest in a handful of strong releases the band has put out since their formation in 2012 – and guitarist/frontman Michael “Weeze” Dawald has a lot more time and focus to devote to the group since leaving the bacchanalian funk band Rowdy Shadehouse last year.

We's Us.

We's Us.

Zeus is a three-song document which showcases the power of the band and also their diversity. While the band’s musical personality falls squarely in the rock genre, their self-proclaimed influences include bands like Soundgarden and Led Zeppelin, but also range as wide as James Brown, George Clinton, and Bob Marley

Zeus was recorded in October 2017 at Umphrey’s McGee guitarist Jake Cinninger’s Boondocks Studio in Niles, Michigan. The engineer on the record was Jim Leep, who has recorded Umphrey’s and Yonder Mountain String Band, among others. It was co-produced by Cinninger, Dawald, and Willie Waldman. Waldman also played trumpet on the third track, an ethereal instrumental called “Passing of a Soul” which was written for Dawald’s grandmother (and played at her funeral). Cinninger also guests on the recording, adding a second guitar to the title track. Keyboardist Stephen Howell, bassist Chris Crantz, and drummer Blake Manion lay down a solid foundation throughout the EP, and Dawald proves himself not only a ridiculously fierce guitarist, but also a strong vocalist. I’ve personally known Weeze for awhile and always been a fan of his playing, but I never knew he could sing like that.

After listening to this and other recordings by We’s Us, you’ll be eager to see the band bring all the fury and passion of their music to the stage! Lucky for you We’s Us play in Denver this Friday the 13th at Your Mom’s House. Get yourself there and in the meantime, give Zeus a listen.

Keep up with We’s Us on Facebook.

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.   

Review: CITRA Serve Up Hard-Hitting Rock On New 'Mr. Copacetic' EP

By: Norman Hittle

Denver-based rockers CITRA just rolled out their Mr. Copacetic EP to the world. The first release since 2017’s single “Air,” CITRA isn’t pulling any punches with their new EP.

With this dosage, CITRA serve up some heavy-hitting rock with nods to the Foo Fighters and riffs reminiscent of Queens of the Stone Age respectively on “Static Erratic” and “Felt So Right.” Moving into track three “That’s What She Said,” the pace takes a small backstep as the song washes over in smokey bar ballad. “Grant My Wish” is a swinging return to some edgy rock while the EP wraps up with the fast paced and hard lined “R.Y.F.F.” According to the band, this music isn’t about any particular theme; however, with the current cultural climate, they couldn’t help but feel a social and political charge energizing their motivations.

Photo Credit:  Mark Tepsic Photography

CITRA have plans to tour with these new songs, adding to their already impressive collection of fan favorites like 2017’s “My Mind,” which already boasts over 10,000 plays on Spotify alone (no small feat for a homegrown band). Yet, they come out of the gates with a realistic attitude:

“We don’t think we’re trying to change the world. Just hopefully getting people out to shows and listening to the music to have a good time and forget about your life for an hour. We think if your goals are beyond that, then you’re doing it for the wrong reasons.”

CITRA.

CITRA.

Mr. Copacetic of course has its own origin tale. Unlike their debut EP Ocean which was recorded immediately after the band formed, the new release has had many capable hands guiding it along like Chris Andrews of Monument Sound on the mixing end and Mike Kalajian of Rogue Planet (The Dear Hunter) mastering.

“We tracked drums at Evergroove Studio and the following week rented a mountain house to track the majority of the rest of the EP. Being fairly isolated was a great way for us to focus on the songs and on making them the best we could. We feel Mr. Copacetic finally represents our sound as it has developed since our formation a couple years ago.”

Keep your eyes peeled for a new music video for “That’s What She Said” in the coming weeks by following the band on their socials here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Crowleys Release New Single "Pink Rainbows" From Upcoming EP

By: Norman Hittle

Just out, The Crowleys have released their first single “Pink Rainbows” from their upcoming EP.

If you could combine the mellower aspects of Rush with the retro psychedelic rock vibes of Tame Impala, you’d start to get an idea of what The Crowleys’ new single is about. Its clean electric guitars and synths form a bed of warm chords appropriate for its comfortable crooning of vocals to rest in.

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The band is comprised of Stuart Downie (drums/backing vocals), Kaulin Horlick (bass), Justyn Horlick (guitar/keys) and Cohen Wylie (guitar/lead vocals) from Hamilton, Ontario. When the four-piece aren’t jamming, they’re trying to obtain an Old Milwaukee Ice sponsorship, playing D&D in the van between gigs, and writing love songs.

“Pink Rainbows” comes from their new forthcoming EP Colours Change Their Tone, due out this Friday, February 9th. The band said this regarding the song:

“Pink Rainbows is the first song that we have recorded that we never played as a full band prior to hitting the studio. Cohen wrote the song awhile back and recorded a few of the parts, and then the rest of the band kind of wrote and recorded on the fly. It gave a lot of creative freedom and we believe it shows in the final product.”

Keep up with The Crowleys on their social media. And check back for their new EP February 9th on Bandcamp.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Eric Dorr's 'Dream Routine' EP Showcases His Ability To Slip Into Many Corners Of Indie

By: Julia Talen

Boulder resident and eclectic musician Eric Dorr has recently released his debut EP, Dream Routine. Dorr moved to Boulder five years ago with his close friend and collaborator Sawyer Bernath after studying music at Temple University in his hometown of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Bernath produced Dorr's polished EP and much of it was recorded in apartments throughout the city of Boulder.

Eric Dorr.

Eric Dorr.

Dorr began playing music in high school band, the trumpet specifically, and that early inspiration definitely weaves into his EP with horns cropping up in many of the tracks. The tracks are quite surreal as the EP's title insinuates; the lyrics often connote dreams and consciousness as the tunes incorporate all sorts of sound, from keys, to overlays of whispers, echoing vocals, hazy instrumentals, horns, and even chimes. Many of the tracks reminded me of Dr. Dog; each song layers and builds while listeners can feel the emotion behind Dorr's vocals. Additionally, the EP's title works, because while every song reflects Dorr's musical interests and abilities experimenting with different sounds and various contrasts, the tracks have a similar formula or structure, like a routine. “Dream Routine” showcases Dorr's seamless ability to slip into and explore assorted sub-genres of indie rock.

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The EP begins with "Kerosene." Sturdy guitars and ample percussion thicken the introduction, which is followed by a beat of silence. Then Dorr's vocals come in, reminiscent of Ben Gibbard's, accompanied by harmonies and instrumentals which steadily progress as the tune unfolds. The end of the song propels us into the album with a culminating build that crescendos as Dorr sings "headed off into an endless dream."

As you move through the EP, you get a taste of Dorr's musical curiosities and wanderlust. The second track, "Around Again," shifts gears, radiating poppy vibes, as it opens with sugary "ooo's" and "ahhh's" that thread throughout the tune. The song builds, similarly to "Kerosene" and the forthcoming tracks, ending distinctively with a couple of verses from the tune sung in a more rustic, faded way, as if we are listening through a wall. It almost feels as though we are crossing time, getting a look into what the first pass of the tune sounded like before it went "around and around" through edits as Dorr added to it.  

Listen to Dream Routine:

"Leaves," the fourth track on the record, also emphasizes Dorr's ability to explore a more pop-indie-rock genre. This catchy, quick tune highlights the whimsical, reverberating keyboard as swift drum beats keep the track moving forward. Dorr's vocals, accompanied by the keys, reminded me of Keane. The lyrics compliment the contemplative themes laced throughout the EP with poetic verses like, "So familiar/Just like a dream… Countin' all the leaves/in the land of a thousand trees/reachin' up your sleeve/for all that use to be." "Leaves" uses lyrics and musical experimentation to navigate themes of dreams and memory as sounds swell and drift away over and over.

Later we hear "The Loss," possibly the tune that ties all of Dorr's musical directions together. The track starts out swaying slowly and moves forward into a catchy refrain echoing the introspective theme of the tune. The backup vocals and Dorr croon, "It won't let go, let go, let go/It won't let go of me/I can't let go/It won't let go of me." Captivating, experimental, and slightly electronic keys interpose between the refrain and verses, and launch forth after the second verse. Everything begins to evolve and grow as the lyrics "a quarter short of a diamond hand" repeat. This song reminded me of something that could be on Dr. Dog's album Fate. "The Loss," surveys a plethora of sounds and instruments within the span of five minutes, from echoing vocals, interesting drums and cymbals, and groovy keys. Though this tune starts out slow, momentum surges as Dorr layers on different resonances that you might not expect to blend, but they do, making the track super stimulating and perhaps my favorite of all.

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Dorr has laid it all out on his short EP. He showcases his ability to slip into the many corners of indie music, and he is not afraid to take on diverse sounds, instruments, and styles. Dorr said in a recent interview regarding his EP that he, "wants to have a few different styles to catch someone’s ear. [My] goal for the next project will definitely be to see how this next couple of months go, how the EP is received… and push in a more specific direction." Though "Dream Routine" navigates all sorts of musical sounds and directions, the consistent builds and structure of each track, along with the introspective thematic content tie the tunes together. See for yourself as Dorr continues to tour and perform tracks from this EP. His next show is Saturday, December 16th at Hunter Bay Coffee Roasters in Arvada.

Keep up with Eric Dorr here.

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Get Along's New 'Let My People Go' EP Explores Eclectic Indie Dance Punk

By: Norman Hittle

Monument’s most amazing music couple is back on our radar with their newest EP: a five song track list featuring their previously released single “Death of a Spirit Animal,” and four other brave and eclectic compositions focusing on breaking one’s own chains and embracing destiny.

Listen to Get Along’s single “Death of a Spirit Animal”:

Get Along is indie dance/punk duo Nick and Cara Yanez, and since 2012 they've been constantly upping their musical game with each successive release. Let My People Go is no exception to their continuous upward trajectory, and along with it comes an array of new sounds that should impress existing fans and new ones alike.

Get Along.

Get Along.

The EP christens us with “Death of a Metal Band,” an Arcade Fire type of upbeat, yet mercurial dance/pop number built upon piano and complimented by heavy guitars in the chorus. “Death of a Spirit” animal follows in a Feist-ish indie/pop array featuring delayed guitars and a brass section, flowing into “Let My People Go I” with its nods to Florence + the Machine in a drawn-out orchestral intro that bleeds into an electronic body of the song. “Let My People Go II” follows with an altogether different vibe. This part of the composition features hints of MUSE along with some intelligent usage of a vocoder for backing vocals. Finally, we arrive at “Exodus” and it's somber yet longing brightness in a style that’s familiar to FUN. in it’s piano man lounge-style which invokes a heavy feeling of reminiscence.

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You can check out Let My People Go on all major streaming services. And you can also join the duo in person at their EP Release Show this Friday September 22nd, at Syntax Physic Opera along with Turvy Organ and Ghostpulse. Details here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Anthony Ruptak's 'Don't Let It Kill You' Is A Dark & Timely Introspection

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s Anthony Ruptak has a new record out this Saturday, July 1st, Don’t Let It Kill You. The 25-minute, five song work is darkly introspective in tone, mood, and lyrics. Songs like “Bomb” and “Eulogy ii” paint Ruptak’s strong lyrical imagery starkly in your mind, while “Follow The Leader” will have you questioning if you’re in need of slowing down time by “sitting back in silence” and “wonder[ing] about nothing, about never.” In a world often clouded by technology and a constant cycle of news, Ruptak’s push on self-reflection is one we really ought to listen to.

Anthony played all of the instruments on Don’t Let It Kill You and is the sole vocalist on the record, except for the drums on “Bomb,” which were played by his brother Matt Ruptak. The entire record was recorded in just two days.

Said Ruptak, “All five songs [on Don’t Let It Kill You] were written within a five month period and deal with a cornucopia of adverse insecurities, dreams, love, death, and my observations of mankind’s inhumanity to man.”

The album artwork for  Don't Let It Kill You .

The album artwork for Don't Let It Kill You.

Though not overtly political in nature, I couldn’t help but notice some political subtleties throughout the record. From lines like, “Learning how to rebrand hate/That is the tried and tested black and blue star-spangled Christian way” (“Vulture And Dove”) to, “The liquor stores have been crowded these days/Things are either getting worse or everybody’s changed” (“Follow The Leader”), Ruptak has accurately identified the sometimes lost, painful, confused, and questioning reality that many of us have experienced over the past year. And then there is the beautiful “I’ll Go Where You Go,” which almost feels like a sentiment of acceptance and belonging that no matter where one is from, we’re all connected in this human experience.

Said Ruptak, “[This record] was recorded during the peak of election season, and though it's not a blatantly political record, it draws from the emotions that surrounded that time- the fear, the uncertainty, the slumbering hatred that was woken by king dipsh*t and the pain that came from watching family members and friends excitedly out themselves as judgement-filled, anti-immigrant, anti-equality, anti-love, entitled Americans.”

His experience is one many of us can relate to. Outside of subject matter, the record overall showcases Ruptak’s incredible vocals and instrumental prowess.

Anthony Ruptak (right) and Matt Ruptak (left). 

Anthony Ruptak (right) and Matt Ruptak (left). 

Said Ruptak, “For the first time since I started recording my songs, I am proud to let this one out into the world. I feel like I'm finally being true to myself.”

And we’re proud to share it. Make sure to catch Anthony Ruptak & The Midnight Friends at his EP Release Show at The Walnut Room Saturday night; tickets and details here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Redline Alchemy's '194 EP' Is As Fluid In Sound As These Multi-Instrumentalists Are Onstage

By: Norman Hittle

The guys in Redline Alchemy don't accept the traditional approach to having a band. To them, playing music is so much of a fluid art, that they themselves fulfill that fluidity by being multi-instrumentalists and loosely structuring themselves in a myriad of genres.

Listen to Redline Alchemy’s new 194 EP:

Comprised of the Ausmus brothers (Joe, Dan, and Nick), Corey Golon, and Nate Wilson, this quintet explores musical wizardry in their 194 EP through rock, jazz, funk, reggae, and jam band feels. With nods to notable bands such as Primus, Sublime, and Silverchair throughout their five songs, I also couldn't help hearing some Mighty Mighty Bosstones and Led Zeppelin influences.

194 EP opens with their single “Soul Searching” in a fun free flow that kicks into a 90’s era alt rock reggae feel that combines the stylistics of Cake and Gorillaz in a garage band format; song two “Pluto” follows suit musically and brings up the comical controversy of the dwarf planet’s categorization as a planet:

“Pluto is a planet, don’t you understand.
Your head’s stuck in Uranus if you can’t handle that.
Unless it is the Death Star then I think it's safe to say.
Pluto got the shaft in every way.”

Song three, “Rhythm of the Dance,” languishes with a sort of Counting Crows jam vibe while song four, “Burning Slow,” unleashes the EP’s best guitar lead lines and some fantastic saxophone soloing. The final track, “Making Moves,” starts out with some accapella, then hits with hip-hop and reggae jam feels to close out the EP.

Overall 194 EP is a solid writing effort from the guys in Redline Alchemy. It’ll be interesting to see where they take their music from here. Catch them at Moe’s BBQ Saturday, June 10th and keep up with the crew on their Facebook.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Denver's The Dirty Circuits Release Debut EP 'Transplants'

By: Norman Hittle

Denver-based artists The Dirty Circuits are elevating their brand of American folk rock with nods to The Lumineers, The Traveling Wilburys, and an almost uncharacteristic, and dare I say non-traditional, edge and attitude that you won't find common in similarly genred bands.

The Dirty Circuits. 

The Dirty Circuits. 

Their debut EP Transplants defines itself with four enjoyably diverse songs starting out with a cover of “Love Makes You Feel.” The song may be an homage to Lou Reed, but the style is so much more reminiscent of Tom Petty with good feeling rock vibes.

Listen to Transplants:

Along with “Love Makes You Feel,” the second track “One Last Drink” continues the good old Americana rock vibe, while “Spin” brings us closer to the band with a personal feel of calming, acoustic guitar and melodic lead lines. The final track “Wanderlost” leaves us with a bright, feeling tale of leaving home behind for adventurous horizons. What I like about Transplants overall is how it reminds me of good times: fishing with my dad, long road trips, and playing music around the campfire. Sometimes it doesn't get much better than that!

Watch a live performance video of The Dirty Circuits at Francisco Studios:

The Dirty Circuits were formed in 2015, combining members from Michigan, California, Tennessee, Virginia, and Illinois, hence their tip of the hat to their origins in their EP title. They ride the line between sophistication and glorious power chord ignorance to make music in the grand American songwriter tradition, with well arranged multi-part harmonies.

Catch the Dirty Circuits April 29th as they headline their debut EP release at Lost Lake Lounge. Supporting them will be The Eldridge Band and Trashcan Jackson. Doors open at 8PM and tickets are available for $10 here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Wolf van Elfmand's New Animated Music Video for "The New Folk"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s Wolf van Elfmand is best known locally for his folk, country, and blues tunes. But his origins in music date back to 2009, when he collaborated with producer Cedar Apffel to release his debut self-titled EP. Since then, Elfmand has released three full length records: Magic to the Lonely, Wolf Sings, and The Death of. His next EP, Real Wolf, drops this summer on June 10th with a release party at Fort Greene Bar. Dango Rose of Elephant Revival co-produced the upcoming EP with Elfmand, and today is the premiere of the new music video for his single “The New Folk.”

The video for “The New Folk” features country and city animations courtesy of Boulder animator and artist Joseph Tonelli. The track features Dango Rose on bass, Enion Pelta-Tiller (Taarka) on fiddle, and backup vocals by Megan Rice. 

Said Wolf about the video, “‘The New Folk’ is a song for the generational shifts that are continuously unfolding. It’s a story of equality that blurs the line between humor and reality, as well as traditional melodies with contemporary form.”

Wolf.

Wolf.

Wolf’s classic format of weaving humor with cynicism in his songwriting is also evident in “The New Folk.” So give it a view and make sure to stay tuned for more music from Wolf on his website. Get details on his release party for Real Wolf here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Jeremy Mohney's New EP 'Solving the World's Problems' Will Make You Swing

By: Austin Michon

Historically, the idea of swing conjures up outdated images of dark, smoky rooms with smooth music emanating from within. However, Colorado's own Jeremy Mohney has taken it upon himself to ensure that swing will not be forgotten any time soon, and his latest release will have you loving a genre that some associate with times of the past.

His newest EP, Solving the World’s Problems, seems to do precisely that. With the help of Alex Heffron and Kyle Ussery on guitar, Chris Carland on drums, and Will Kuepper on bass, Jeremy Mohney’s alto sax and smooth vocals transport the listener to a simple, relaxed time of the 1930s while still remaining current.

For a moment, the album takes you away, clears the mind, and lets you just stop and truly enjoy the music. Every track sounds like an authentic Glenn Miller recording, capturing every nuance and essence that makes swing what it is. Kuepper’s upright bass and Carland’s drums form a light, jazzy bounce, while the guitarists and sax layer overtop intertwining with each other.

Jeremy Mohney. 

Jeremy Mohney. 

Keeping a classic swing formula, the instrumentals never bore with the interesting, dynamic solos for which jazz is renowned. Providing a fantastic experience and new way for many listeners to access the genres of swing and jazz, I’m sure that Jeremy Mohney and his band could fuel the sound of any modern day speakeasy. Be sure to catch them at their upcoming show Wednesday, April 12th at Colorado Plus, and keep up with Mohney’s music here.

-Austin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Singer/Songwriter Dave Tamkin Drops New EP of Sophisticated, Easy Listening Tunes

By: Mirna Tufekcic

Dave Tamkin is a Boulder transplant by way of Chicago, and he’s taken the singer/songwriter scene in Colorado by the horns. Whether playing solo shows or rocking out with a full band, Tamkin brings a unique style of rhythmic-acoustic sounds, personal lyrics, and a high-energy percussive backbone. His music is sophisticated easy-listening.  

Give Tamkin’s new single “Hope, Love, Strength” a listen:

Tamkin’s new EP drops tomorrow, with a CD Release Party this Saturday, April 15th at Denver’s The Walnut Room. He’ll be accompanied for the evening by Kevin Mileski, Brian Allison, and Decibel Sound Company. If you haven’t been to The Walnut Room to check out some singer/songwriters, this is a great time to do it, and Tamkin’s set is bound to be a crowd pleaser.

Dave Tamkin. Photo Credit:  Kit Chalborg

Dave Tamkin. Photo Credit: Kit Chalborg

Tamkin has a couple of other Colorado gigs this month in support of his new release. Catch him at Boulder’s Rayback Collective April 22nd. Keep up with Dave on his website; Walnut Room tickets here.

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Chess at Breakfast's 'The Gutshalls'

By: Austin Michon

Somewhere between ambient, crawling ballads, and full force grunge rock, Fort Collins’ own Chess at Breakfast have carved themselves a niche in the alternative rock genre with their debut EP, The Gutshalls.

Listen to Chess at Breakfast’s The Gutshalls:

Mixing slow psychedelic sounds with cranked distortion, simple grooves, catchy riffs, and full-out sonic onslaught, Caleb McFadden, Justin Daggett, and Mike Davis intermingle each instrument into one cohesive unit. While some songs are reminiscent of a grungy, shoegaze style, others are a more modern indie rock experience, with each of the five songs seemingly highlighting a strength or focal point of the group.

In Hindsight,” a track I could see floating through a Buffy the Vampire Slayer intro, instantly transports you to the sounds of the 1990s, while “Andesite” takes you through a trippy, Pink Floydian sonic landscape, punctuated with moments of raw emotion and rock. “415” provides an almost jazz-esque groove which gives way to the trio’s characteristic heavier rock sound.

Chess at Breakfast.

Chess at Breakfast.

Somewhere between Modest Mouse, The Dear Hunter, and The Smashing Pumpkins, Chess at Breakfast have created unique, fun altrock that I hope to hear much more of. Be sure to catch them at Fort Collins’ Downtown Artery this Friday, April 7th with Race to Neptune and Turvy Organ. And keep up with Chess at Breakfast here.

-Austin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Millennial Wise: Chloe Tang’s 'Passion//Aggression'

By: Will Baumgartner

Louis CK, the brilliant comedian and social critic, has a bit in which he explains why a 50-year-old garbage man is more interesting than any 21-year-old with four degrees (or something to that effect). The bit is spot on, though like most philosophies, it does have its exceptions. Sometimes this baby boomer meets a millennial who feels wise beyond their years, and beyond “interesting” to the point of being rather fascinating. Though I haven’t met Chloe Tang in person, listening to her new EP Passion//Aggression is like meeting a young person who exceeds expectations and defies stereotypes.

Chloe Tang.

Chloe Tang.

The five-song disc begins quietly, and overall, the feel of the EP is just a bit more introspective than rocking. Still, each of the songs has a drive and momentum that’s infectious. “No One Will” has a lilting beginning, a building verse, and a breakaway chorus marked by its relatively stark instrumentation. Like several of the songs here, it’s about love gone awry, regret, and acknowledgement of the good in a sad situation. It’s a hallmark of all these songs that shows how a young woman can be wise: looking at herself as well as her lover, asking important questions, and sparing herself nothing in her reflections on the scene described. This girl pulls no punches, even when they’re aimed at herself.

The second song, “Electrified,” is one of my favorites for several reasons: as befits the title, it rocks at least as hard as any of the other tracks, it has a killer chorus, and I love a song that declares independence from a relationship that was more unhealthy than the other way around, or at least that’s what this listener got from the lyrics. Maybe Tang herself would tell me I read it wrong, but that’s another great thing about these songs: for the most part, her lyrics are sparsely imagistic and leave at least something to interpretation and imagination.

Watch Chloe Tang’s music video for “Forgive You Again”:

“Forgive You Again” is the release’s centerpiece, the first single, and there’s a great video you should watch: I defy any sentient person to resist choking up a little seeing it; I certainly did. The song itself is a power ballad with a kind message: “When ghosts return/we always learn to find a way to balance and burn/They will make you confess your worst and your best/but maybe they’ll forgive you again.” It’s an undeniably sweet and powerful song; it also features what’s been dubbed the “Millennial Whoop”: a wordless refrain that uses the fifth and third of a major scale. When I chatted with Chloe on the phone, I mentioned this, and she was genuinely surprised that she’d used this device she’d never even heard about. To me, that’s further proof that she is overall a genuine and sincere soul; there’s no guile in her songwriting, just a lot of heart, and a songwriter doesn’t exist who hasn’t used common devices like this, whether consciously or not.

“Tell Me I’m Wrong” returns to the theme of self-examination and self-confrontation. Like I said, Chloe pulls no punches with lines like, “My excuse is I wasn’t awake” and “I woke up every day with a lie and a bluff.” Again, it’s a song that begins quietly, builds through the verse, and hones in with a powerful chorus, like having a frank conversation with oneself.

The EP’s closer, “Till I Get Up,” is in a lot of ways the strongest song here. It begins with a groovy soul bassline and proceeds to rock righteously through the verse and chorus. The lyrics stress persistence through difficulties leading to a strong resolve, and the overall result is a song that feels like an anthem you want to shout along with. “It’s me against myself and all my ghosts;” “And it keeps pushing waiting for me to make a fuss/but I breathe, I breathe, I breathe till I get up.” Tell it, sister!  

Chloe Tang is indeed 21 years old, and I didn’t ask her much about her education, but I don’t think she has any degrees yet, let alone four: she currently studies songwriting at CU Denver, and went to a charter arts school in her native state of Arizona prior. She began playing piano and singing at the age of five, and started writing songs at about age 15. She grew up on folk (her Dad’s influence), is a fan of James Bay, Kaleo, Of Monsters and Men, and Amber Run, and has been lately getting into classic rock. She also confesses a love of “corny pop from the eighties.” I may not share all her tastes, but I’m sure we could have at least one long and fascinating conversation about music, and yes, about life: she might even teach me a thing or two! I’m definitely going to be at her EP release show at the Hi-Dive this Thursday March 9th because after listening to this young woman’s music, I just have to see what she does with it live. Join me; tickets here.

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Alternative Punk Rock Group American Blackout Debut 'Yeah So What' EP

By: Jura Daubenspeck

The gifts just keep on coming this holiday season with today’s release of the newest 'Yeah So What' EP by alternative punk rock group American Blackout. Hailing from Fort Collins, CO, members Craig Miller (vocals/guitar), Damian Schoenecke (guitar), Ross Dougherty (bass) and Gus Mircos (drums) have been anticipating this release for almost a year. Needless to say, the band is excited for today’s debut, so we sat down with frontman Craig Miller to get the scoop on American Black’s new music and more. Here’s our chat:

The 'Yeah So What' EP is your third and final release of 2016. How long have you guys been working on this for?

For a while now. We released our first single “Pants on Fire” last January, and just released “Shots Fired” in September, so [the whole EP] has been about one year in the works. We recorded all five tracks at The Spot Studios, recording two at a time, then recording one last song to finish it up. Lately we’ve been getting it all packaged, mastered, and ready for release.

American Blackout. Photo Credit: Studio Ardesco.

American Blackout. Photo Credit: Studio Ardesco.

There’s been quite a bit of hype leading up to this release, with little sneak previews, bundles, and free giveaways. How have people reacted so far?

Everyone seems pretty excited about it. We’ve received really good reviews on the singles. We just previewed our title track, “Yeah So What” yesterday, which is our favorite song to play live. It’s upbeat and high energy, which is perfect because we get down at our live shows.

What can fans expect from this new EP? What kinds of sounds and influences are embedded in it? Any themes?

What I like most about it is that it’s a little bit of a deviation from our last EP, Summer’s Gone. It’s a much more matured sound and a lot less “poppy.” The last EP focused a lot more on relationships, whereas Yeah So What is more raw and edgy, especially “Shots Fired.” Our lyrics have matured and our sound is a bit more gritty. As always, we’ve got a clean, crisply produced sound from working at The Spot Studios, but [this new release] just ended up being more energetic rock’n’roll versus pop. We like the direction it’s going in.

Listen to American Blackout's new Yeah So What EP:

Are there any special guest features on this release?

No guest features. One major difference is that this EP was recorded with our old drummer Jason LaBella. We have a new drummer now, Gus Mircos, who will be playing at the EP release show with us. We’re grateful to have worked with Jason, and are excited to have Gus with us now.

What was the creative process behind this release? Any particular reason why you’re aiming for an end of year release VS a new year release?

An end of the year release was just how it ended up happening with the availability and materials. Our last full-length release was in January 2015, so we are due for another one. Also, December is a great time to go out, given the holidays. Regarding our creative process, we’ve been writing a lot, and have been picky about what songs we wanted to record and what songs we wanted to included. We’ve been much more selective, starting with a basic idea, gathering new ideas, and continuing that effort until those ideas materialize into a song.

AB. Photo Credit: Talia Lezama.

AB. Photo Credit: Talia Lezama.

Will there be a tour to accompany this release? Any holiday pit stops you plan to make?

Our EP Release Party is this Saturday, December 17th at Downtown Artery. Then we’ve got a series of shows in late January, including a show at The Moxi Theater. We plan to hit the road in March 2017, working our way through the Southwest, California, and Nevada.

Finally, as an alternative punk band in Colorado, where do you most find your niche?

We’ve been able to make a lot of friends in different genres of music. We love playing with Wiredogs, who will also be playing at our EP Release Party this Friday along with I Am The Owl. We like playing with those guys quite a bit. We met so many different bands through the SpokesBUZZ program and we have played with many other genres, like the Gasoline Lollipops, who are more bluegrass/folk. We like to mix it up and tailor our sets to the other bands’ styles. That’s what’s great about the Colorado music scene: everyone likes to work together, meet new people, and experience new styles of music.

Keep in touch with American Blackout via their Facebook, Instagram, and website. And be sure to grab your tickets to their EP Release Party this Saturday, December 17th!

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Halloweekend Six: Six Shows to See 10/28 & 10/29

By: Hannah Oreskovich

It’s been a minute Sixers! But we had to give you a Halloweekend guide, so party down at these spots in your best costumes this weekend:

Today (Friday 10/28):

In The Whale EP Release with One Flew West, CITRA, & Loretta Kill at Larimer Lounge in Denver 8PM-Close

In The Whale.

In The Whale.

Denver’s In The Whale have been traveling around the state this month in support of their new EP Quicksand, which you should definitely peep below. Tonight, the rock duo will be blasting the walls at the Larimer in a show of ghoulish delight that screams happy heavy Halloweekend. The always entertaining One Flew West will share the stage for the evening, along with Denver favorite CITRA, and rock duo Loretta Kill. Come dressed as a beardbanger and get ready to party.

Hand your zombie ears over to In The Whale’s new EP Quicksand:

Ben de la Cour, The Heartstring Hunters, Alex Maes, & Theresa Peterson at The Walnut Room in Denver 8PM-Close

Ben de la Cour.

Ben de la Cour.

Denver’s Walnut Room will be full of haunting vocals tonight, ready to launch you into all that is Halloweekend. Folk artist Ben de la Cour will headline the evening, with opening appearances by Boulder’s The Heartstring Hunters and Theresa Peterson, plus Salida’s Alex Maes. Sounds like a chilling good time to us.

Give Ben de la Cour’s Midnight in Havana a deep, dark listen:

Whiskey Autumn’s Halloween Bash at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

Whiskey Autumn.

Whiskey Autumn.

Boulder’s Whiskey Autumn are holding down our favorite Boulder joint tonight, where rumor has it the vibes of legends past will make eerie appearances, including our favorite grunge god Kurt Cobain. The winds have whispered something about Prince too. Roll over and dance with this indie pop rock trio while you sip on all your favorite spirits…

Get your creepy carnival on with Whiskey Autumn’s “Coney Island” video from CPR:

Tomorrow (Saturday 10/29):

The Great Halloween Pumpkin Bash Block Party at Deviant Spirits in Boulder 630PM-Close

Kronen Band.

Kronen Band.

Deviant Spirits Distillery is hosting one trick or treatful celebration tomorrow night with J Wells Brewery, Rowdy Mermaid Kombucha, and The French Twist Food Truck. The music planned is equally sweet, with performances by Last Minute Blues Band, Kronen Band, and Emmanuel Dali on the books. Who needs candy when you can brews?

The visuals in Kronen Band’s “Artfully Answered” will get your Halloweekend tripppin’:

Ultraween6 Presents: Bud Bronson & The Good Timers, The Velveteers, & DJ E-Trane at Azatlan Theater in Denver

BBGT.

BBGT.

Our friends over at Ultra5280 are throwing a massively cool monster bash this Halloweekend. Performances by Bud Bronson & The Good Timers, The Velveteers, and DJ E-Trane will melt you. And if you roll VIP (which why not, Halloweenie?) there is a fashion show, goodies, a meet and greet, and more. Get other details plus tickets right here to party at this Denver haunt.

Rock your skulls out to Bud Bronson & The Good Timers’ Fantasy Machine:

Tenth Mountain Division’s Boogie Nights Halloween with Guerilla Fanfare at The Lazy Dog in Boulder 10PM-Close

14633203_942685029209675_4805865601883093447_o.jpg

Mustaches have been grown, extremely tight pants will be worn, and Boulder’s Tenth Mountain Division will be throwing one crazy ski rock party at The Lazy Dog tomorrow night. Guerilla Fanfare will join the crew on horns for the Boogie Nights-themed bash, which will feature music from the iconic film and a number of the band’s originals. Feast on that.

Boogie down to TMD’s “Storm of the Century”:

Can’t wait to creep with you Colorado! Happy Halloweekend!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

'The Mercury EP' Marks New Era For Colorado's Augustus

By: Riley Ann

Augustus’ latest release is a new plateau for the Boulder-based band. While their early recordings were more rootsy folk rock, The Mercury EP showcases the next era for the trio with a full-blown rock sound that is bold, tight, and unyielding.

Album art from  The Mercury EP .

Album art from The Mercury EP.

The core of Augustus’ sound still comes from solid songwriting, but what stands out on this release is how the songs have been reigned in to feature the ensemble. Instead of meandering vocal melodies and forms from the singer/songwriter tradition that Augustus harnessed in the past, The Mercury EP features vocal lines, guitar riffs, and drum beats that drive the momentum of its songs forward. These sonic changes were no surprise with the recent restructuring of the band instrumentally: since replacing the cello with electric bass, the three-piece were thrust into a new, electrified realm.

Augustus' Colin Kelly.

Augustus' Colin Kelly.

“[The Mercury EP] is definitely more guitar-heavy than any of the other recordings we’ve done,” said Jim Herlihy, guitarist and drummer of the band, “The last two albums were mostly acoustic that dipped their toes in a little bit of electric stuff. For this one, we don’t have banjo or cello on it, but we have a lot more electric guitar.”

Jim Herlihy.

Jim Herlihy.

This is Augustus’ third EP in three years. When asked why they’ve chosen to release EPs rather than albums, Jim offered, “The change is happening quickly, and recording albums takes a long time. In a practical world, releasing smaller snapshot records as EPs rather than full-length albums gives us the ability to grow faster.”

The Mercury EP is definitely one of those snapshots, and it’s evidence of a new trajectory for the band in just five songs. It’s Augustus’ first rock release, and it promises even bigger things to come. It would be no surprise to see a full-time drummer join the band soon, and to see attention for the group grow beyond Colorado. The trio has already earned accolades from Colorado Music Buzz, the Marquee, and Boulder Weekly, and they’ve played shows at The Fox Theatre, area festivals, and throughout the state.

You can join Augustus in celebrating the release of The Mercury EP this Friday, October 14th at Studio 700. Doors open at 7:30PM, and more details about this CD Release Party can be found here, and on the band’s website. You can also stream and purchase The Mercury EP, and Augustus’ previous recordings, through their Bandcamp page. Rock on.

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Evan Holm & The Restless Ones Have Us Reminiscing On 'Good Old Days' New EP

By: Jesse Sandoval

That feeling when you’re alone and suddenly reminded of your former lover’s touch. When you realize you’ve been without something precious for far too long. When you think about the mistakes you wish you didn’t make. When you wonder if your lingering nostalgia is another rivertooth mistake... These are the kinds of feelings that Denver’s Evan Holm & The Restless Ones stir up in the two folk soul tracks they have most recently gifted us, “Good Old Days” and “Long Gone”.

Denver's Evan Holm.

Denver's Evan Holm.

Beautifully recorded live, and on tape at Silo Sound with Todd Divel, the band's two new tantalizing tracks will be part of their latest EP, titled Good Old Days, which is set for release this week. And let me tell you, this is a release I am stoked on.

Listen to Evan Holm & The Restless One’s “Good Old Days”:

Evan Holm & The Restless Ones have managed to produce tracks that are silky smooth, soulful, and show a balanced maturity of gratifying writing and performance with “Good Old Days” and “Long Gone”. The reverb on these tunes is so comforting that it’s almost as though the alleviating effects of the music were made sonic. It is beautiful music. The group is releasing two new songs this week from the EP as well, "What I Know" and "You Are You".

Since “Good Old Days” and “Long Gone” were recorded live, we already have a sense of how tight the group is. It’s no surprise then that the five-piece have already played some major Denver gigs, and even had a UMS spot this summer.  

Evan Holm & The Restless Ones.

Evan Holm & The Restless Ones.

The CD release party for Good Old Days is slated for this Thursday, October 6th at 8PM at the Hi-Dive. Turvy Organ will open the night, and I recommend you don’t miss this one. You’ll be glad you went.

More info on the release show and other gigs can be found on the band’s Facebook page.

Recommended If You Like: The National, Alabama Shakes, My Morning Jacket, The War on Drugs

-Jesse

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

"Praise The Funk!": The Pamlico Sound's CD Release Party for 'Jive Church'

“Praise the Funk!” The Reverend EverReady (also known as Will Baumgartner) preached in his pre-show sermon last weekend. And The Pamlico Sound will have you doing exactly that. Throughout their CD release party at Boulder’s The Lazy Dog, the band played tight party funk interspersed with “sermons” from members Ghana Queen (LaShá Afarko) and The Reverend EverReady. At one point, The Reverend even pulled out a water spritzer and “baptized the congregation in the funk”. If that doesn’t prove this band’s energy, let me tell you more about why this is an act you should see:

TPS will have your butt shaking with a funk reminiscent of James Brown meets Larry Graham plus a heavily featured and superb brass section. Mark Wilkolak holds the trombone with an energetically engaging and lighthearted presence that will have you smiling from ear to ear. His brother Matt, who jumps onstage from time to time, turns heads with his trumpet shreds. Maus Nomdeguerre tears up the saxophone with the most badass, old school jazz/blues aura you will ever see, while Greg Leistikow dances on the keys elegantly. Jimmy Giachetti rips on guitar with an otherworldly feel, and Mark Dabrowski holds down some funkin’ funky bass lines. And all the while, The Reverend EverReady leads the band with a multi-instrumental show, playing the baritone and soprano saxophones and the flute. He also shares vocals with Ghana Queen, whose silky-smooth voice paired with her magnetic stage presence will have you grooving throughout the band’s entire set. And last, but certainly not least, one of the best drummers in town is Curtis Collazo, who sits on his throne and bangs out supernaturally intricate rhythms.

The Reverend EverReady. Photo Credit:  Miles Photography

The Reverend EverReady. Photo Credit: Miles Photography

The band’s new EP, Jive Church, showcases the band’s skill set from start to finish. The opening track, “Getcha Self”, is aptly placed at the start of the album as a call to action for people to “Getcha Self UP!” Following this track are “I Know Good”, “Let’s Funk”, and "Here Comes the Devil", keeping the mood light. Finally, “Dancin off the Wall” finishes out the album as another high-energy tune.

The Pamlico Sound. Photo Credit:  Miles Photography

The Pamlico Sound. Photo Credit: Miles Photography

This is a band who plays tight, and who is engaging to experience. They’ve got their sound dialed-in and their performance (both musically and in-between songs) is well-practiced. Keep up with The Pamlico Sound on their Facebook. And make sure to check out their next CD Release Show for Jive Church on October 13th at Ophelia's.

-Clinton

All photos per Miles Photography. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.