Nobide Chats with Us About Their New Single & What It Means to Be "Organic Electronica"

By: Norman Hittle

Nobide is a Boulder, CO based live electronic band who classify themselves enigmatically as “organic electronica.” Their new single “Wildin’ Out” was just released, so we decided to catch up with band founder Nick Vann to discuss their brand of music as well as what the future holds.

Listen to “Wildin’ Out”:

Nobide is an interesting name and doesn’t seem to hint at its meaning. Would you guys care to elaborate on your project name a bit?

The name Nobide originated in 2015 when I was reading an Eastern philosophy book. There was a chapter exploring what happens when we die, and a particularly poignant part of that suggested that as humans we shouldn't waste our time so that when we meet death we don't go full of regret. I wrote down in my journal ‘no biding time’ and the name sort of came to life. What's really cool and special to us is that Nobide isn't a word, so we get to totally shape and explore the concept and meaning.

What’s the origin tale of Nobide?

Nobide originated as my solo project in 2015. From inception, the focus has been on organic electronic music; walking the line between totally produced pieces and live recorded pieces. The fusion is where the magic happens; it's like you're human but not. Nobide continued to develop and expand into live performances as time moved forward. I was simultaneously studying at CU Boulder and created an independent study major called ‘sociomusicology’ which allowed for a more academic side of exploring with Nobide as well. For graduation, my thesis included the album Contrary To Popular Belief, a written exploration of the project, as well as a live performance of some of the songs. The thesis was the first time Nobide music was performed by a band, and within six months, the Nobide band as it lives now had settled into place. The members now include Nick Vann, Matt McElwain, Ted Kleist, and Tanner Fruit.

You classify yourselves as “organic electronica” and right out of the gate that sounds fun and interesting. Can you go into detail as to how you arrived at that classification and what that entails?

Organic electronic was kind of poking fun at Boulder's hyper-health conscious culture, but it really stuck and we think it's a great description of our sound. We're influenced by people like Lettuce, Snarky Puppy, Pretty Lights, Bassnectar, Bonobo, etc. and when describing their sound to others, ‘organic’ is often a term that pops up. We think it's a good description for our sound as we're very focused on bringing a sort of natural sound and texture to electronic music. The potentials of electronic music are incredible, but so much of it feels one-dimensional today. We're interested in maintaining a natural feel and sense of space/development in our recordings and live shows; not being tied to traditional instruments or to computers. It's an incredibly exciting place to be exploring. We can't wait to hear what we're making in two years, five years, ten years!

Nobide.

Nobide.

“Wildin’ Out” is a very eclectic mix of dance and live instrumentation - as could be suggested by your genre classification - and it makes me wonder, what is the writing process like for you guys? Do you start out all electronic and branch out to live instruments? Or go the live route and then add the electronic elements? Or something else altogether?

The writing process varies. As the band lineup still quite new, we don't have an established method of working. Most songs start as riffs or beats that I produce, then bring to the band. We're big fans of working out songs live. From the second we have an arrangement that's cohesive, we're playing it live and figuring out what works and what doesn't. It's a very iterative process. We'll write a new section, then discard it two weeks later after trying it out. We get together for practice and we'll jam one song for half an hour and find all sorts of new places to take it, and that's incredibly inspiring. As we move forward it seems everyone will be pretty involved with the production/writing processes. Matt and Ted are just learning to navigate the Ableton universe, so they'll be able to write more as well. What's especially killing about having an electronic heartbeat is that we can write wherever we are. We're heavily influenced by our travels and people we meet; to be able to put that right into sound is a huge opportunity for us.

Is “Wildin’ Out” a part of a full LP or EP, or is it specifically a single? Can we expect more to be released from Nobide soon?

Wildin' Out’ is just a single, but it's pretty definitive of the realm we're exploring. We do have several more releases slated for this year, and then LOTS for 2019. We're trying to be strategic about all of it and give each song/project the attention and care they deserve.

Looking at your past discography, it seems like you guys have been working hard for a few years on your craft. What’s in store for the future of Nobide?

The future of Nobide is really exciting. We really don't know what's going to happen, but we know we're on to something with this sound. We really just want to get deeper into exploring its potentials, possibilities, and crossovers with other art forms/mediums/artists. We're at a really exciting place as a band right now in that we're starting to get some attention, but we have no expectations yet. We've got a completely blank page we get to start with, which means we have lots of room to explore. At the end of the day, everybody wants more good music, and we want to be making some of the best organic electronic out there. So the immediate future for us looks like lots of time in the studio and lots of shows just working to be the best we can be.

Catch Nobide’s upcoming live performance with Mimosa next Wednesday, November 7th at Cervantes. Event details here!

Keep up with Nobide here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

GoGo Penguin Bring Their Jazz Electronica To Boulder Theater

By: Mirna Tufekcic

It’s always such a rush to find new music and get excited about the prospect of hearing it live. Are you into jazz? If so, you’re in luck! The UK’s GoGo Penguin trio are playing the Boulder Theatre this Wednesday, September 6th.

GoGo Penguin.

GoGo Penguin.

To music lovers and musicians alike: these guys are about to blow your musical brains out. Trippy, jazzy, trip-hop, and classical melodies meshed with modern beats and deep bass jives, concocted into a potion that gently pushes the envelope and makes your ears perk up- that’s GoGo Penguin. Just listening to them on Spotify made the hair on the back of my neck stand tall.  

Check out GoGo Penguin:

If GGP are anywhere as playful live as they are on record, Wednesday’s show is bound to be a sonically bountiful evening for your ears to feast on. Get tickets while you can, folks! Who knows when this talented crew will cross the pond again.

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Joseph Lamar's 'Quarter-Life Righteous' Is As Eclectic As It Is Beautiful

By: Jura Daubenspeck

I’ve recently fallen in love with some music. And I’ve gotta say, I think it’s getting serious.

Colorado Springs artist Joseph Lamar resides in many categories: a singer, songwriter, producer, storyteller, instrumentalist, dancer, and my personal favorite? Genre-f*cker. His debut album Quarter-Life Righteous (released March 31st) is an iridescent daydream, adorned with stunning vocals and introspective storytelling.

The badass album art for 'Quarter-Life Righteous.'

The badass album art for 'Quarter-Life Righteous.'

Quarter-Life Righteous feels like its very own storybook, with 15 uniquely-crafted and intentionally-chosen songs filling its pages. In the album, Lamar plays with double meanings and juxtaposition, all while exposing a common idea. He blends rock, pop, hip-hop, R&B, electronica, and neo-soul (amongst others) to create a vastly unique sound that challenges expectations and encourages expression.

Listen to Quarter-Life Righteous:

It’s hard to pick favorites, but there are definitely songs that have danced through my mind consistently since first listening to the album. “Black Boy,” “Not Gonna Call,” “I Want You,” and “Cosmic Joke” are personal frontrunners, but each song is complex lyrically and sonically. I dare you to find the songs that speak to you most.

Joseph Lamar. Photo Credit: David Rossa

Joseph Lamar. Photo Credit: David Rossa

In his own words, Lamar shared:

“I explored intersectionality and my experience as a black, gay, agnostic, cis-man on ‘Black Boy.’ I kinda explored the female identity (I think we're all both) on ‘Cruel Girl,’ and talked about the absurdity of existence on ‘Cosmic Joke.’ I think overall [Quarter-Life Righteous] is about trying to achieve a sense of self-actualization at a time in life when some people start to settle or become complacent.”
Photo Credit:  Gary Sheer

Photo Credit: Gary Sheer

Quarter-Life Righteous feels dark in the way that we all feel dark from time to time: that dark that stems from questioning yourself, others, and the universe that encapsulates us. It’s healthy, it’s present, and it’s real. The vibrant energy felt in this album is visceral, yet very much cerebral.

Photo Credit: Elle Coxon

Photo Credit: Elle Coxon

Many talented artists contributed to the creation of the album- check out who did what here and peruse the inspiration for each song.

Connect with Joseph Lamar on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For an extra glimpse into his music, check out the music video for “About Love: Concerning the Discrepancies Between Expectations and Reality” below:

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Get Your Weird On at Get Along's Single Release Show This Friday at Lost Lake

By: Jura Daubenspeck

Itching for some weirdness this weekend? Lusting for some tunes that will make you swoon? Lucky for you, this Friday, April 7th is shaping up to be a stellar one, as indie dance-punk duo Get Along are unveiling their single and music video for “Death of a Spirit Animal” at Lost Lake Lounge. They’ll be accompanied on the bill by church fire, Signs and Signals, and Specific Ocean.

Get Along. Photo Credit:  Joel Rekiel

Get Along. Photo Credit: Joel Rekiel

Get Along has been hard at work the last few months recording “Death of a Spirit Animal” at The Spot Studios, and shooting the accompanying music video. Known for their soulful and bizarre sound, as well as their explosively commanding stage presence, the band has taken it up another notch with their newest release.

Unlike Get Along’s other songs, such as “DNA,” “Karaoke,” and “YUKI,” “Death of a Spirit Animal” has a mellow quality that oozes with raw energy and introspection. The song takes risks with its sound and content: it has no clear verse or chorus bridge arrangement, but a mid-song climax that resembles a Shakespearean plotline. “Death of a Spirit Animal” touches upon the painful and chest-tightening moment of clarity that forces one to look at their life from a different perspective and ask, “Do I like the person I’ve become?”

church fire.

church fire.

Supporting acts church fire, Signs and Signals, and Specific Ocean all will bring their own tasty ingredients to the bubbling cauldron that is Friday’s show.

church fire has established themselves as the warlocks of darkwave noise-pop, wielding magic with their experimental electronica. No strangers to the strange, they are often seen donned in masks and mystical headwear, all while belting out screams in songs such as “every toss a tightening.”

Signs and Signals has been creating melodic, rhythmically-smooth alternative rock since 2014. Their catchy, vibrant sound, as heard in their hit song “Fight or Flight” has earned them acclaim, and their fine-tuned stage presence makes their music nearly impossible not to jump around to.

Specific Ocean.

Specific Ocean.

Indie newcomers Specific Ocean bring a young, playful energy to their music. The band all met while studying at Denver’s Lamont School of Music, and have been crafting comforting, dreamy tunes like “Strangers” ever since.

Listen to Specific Ocean's "Strangers": 

Come Friday, be ready to shake off your human skin and let your freak flag fly high for all to see. You’ll be welcomed with some equally killer, kooky beats to dance to.

For more details, check out the Facebook event page. Advance tickets are still on sale for $10 (plus there are some killer t-shirt + ticket combinations), so grab ‘em while they’re hot!

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

(Un)Traditional Love Songs: A Playlist For Your Valentine's Day & So Much More

By: Joliene Adams

Forget complaints about Valentine’s Day commercialism. Let’s think instead on the limitations of the kind of love that gets advertised to us. Love comes in all shapes and sizes far beyond romantic, and this playlist reflects all those feelings and shades of love. Wherever you are at in your love life and whoever you love in whatever ways, whether the burning embers of passion or the charcoal heart of getting burned from love; from your lover to your mother, it’s all here:

Listen to BolderBeat’s “(Un)Traditional Love Songs” Playlist:

1. “Death Hex” – The VelveteersDeath Hex (2016)

No one said love came without barbs. Hook, line, and sinker, The Velveteers rock straight for the jugular. John Demitro’s drums thunder with the urgency of foreboding storms while Demi Demitro’s tight, heavy guitar licks smack you awake. Staggered vocal notes build tension up to lift off as Demi lets melodic hollers unapologetically rip. If their rock doesn’t shatter the teacups on your shelf, you haven’t turned that heavy grit up loud enough.

And this one’s lyrical content doesn’t dote expressly on love. Demi speaks to this in an interview covered by BolderBeat’s Hannah Oreskovich, “‘Death Hex’ is about awakening from the dead and saying goodbye to the past. It was really inspired by a sense of magic I felt happening. It’s a story of coming back from a bad situation and coming out on the other side better than you ever imagined.” It might not be about love, but it’s an ages old story, that of the lover who rises from the ashes. Take your heartbreak, wipe the floor clean with it, and rise from the ashes bigger, better, stronger, faster, badder-asser.

2. “Didn’t See You There” – Red Fox RunRed Fox Run (2015)

Ever turned around or glanced sidelong at your buddy and all of a sudden SPLAT, you think, “I did NOT realize my friend was this cute let alone that that I was in love with them this whole time?” This number cascades and careens as your own feelings might at such a realization. Red Fox Run fearlessly showcase vocalist and rhythm guitarist Daniel Rondeau shouting out a proclamation from the truths that sit in the center pit of a heart. He’s proclaiming hopeful, but it’s clearly uncertain since “I couldn’t love you more than I do right now” isn’t the end of the sentence. Red Fox Run keep it playful, but in the end, they’ve said all they need to say.

It’s the year anniversary of Red Fox Run being no longer, an anniversary that may bring with it many a fan’s broken heart. But the good news is that three out of four original RFR members continue on in their new Denver-based project Wildermiss.

3. “I Like You” – Ned Garthe Explosion Flashlight Tan (2016)

Crash forward, skid in sideways, stop abruptly- you’ll travel at all different speeds in Ned Garthe Explosion’s capable hands. Splaying themselves across diverse elements is something familiar to Ned Garthe Explosion and their fans. As Andy Thomas of Westword notes, 2016’s Flashlight Tan finds frontman Ned Garthe and his co-conspirators messing around with genre and intent “writing deliberately toward a certain genre, in an earnest near-parody that’s so good you can’t tell it’s a parody. It’s a depth of vision that can only be achieved late at night, when the cops are nowhere to be found.” But isn’t that love sometimes? Crashing forward, landing backwards… and even sometimes ending in a weird parody you sort of knew existed.

4. “Call Through the Wire” – Inner Oceans Call Through the Wire (2016)

“If I leave you in the night...” The suggestion alone leaves you indignant, does it not? The sentiment wells up from something clearly much deeper as Inner Oceans’ frontman Griffith Snyder sings lushly of the story unfolding. “I see you all the time and it hurts to think you were right,” he sings. The sound is atmospherically absorbing while the message delivers clear adoration with a twinge of regret and a still-in-love/lust-with-you. Sometimes it’s hard to separate the two, in life or in music, and I can’t come down on which it might be here but I’m ok with it.

5. “Shooting Star” – RossonianYou Are Your Own Dentist (2013)

Rossonian use space and astral phenomena as metaphor, delivering dreamy and delicate wonder. This one is absolutely a love song, but also earns love for the success of their symbolic narrative. It propels, then floats, taking pause to deliver changes in emphatic subtleties. Rossonian is master of small sound shifts across a slow build, lending the song a complexity that doesn’t announce itself like a smack to the face, but rather comes at and through you like the feeling of slowly waking up. This one’s a gentle journey from one end of conscious awareness to another, starting gently and sleepily as it comes to burn bright-eyed awake.  

6.  “Day I Was Born” – 5ive, Jessica Jones – Radioland (2016)

There’s romantic love, and then there’s the love for your mother. Both can overpower. If I had any doubts as to which it was here at first (the word “mama” is sufficiently vague enough terminology to always throw me off without further clear direction), Jessica Jones’ vocal turn sways results to the latter. “Mama you believed in me, even when my skies were gray, you gave me the entire world… people asked me how’d I got so strong. I tell ‘em that my mama showed me the way. You always raised me up right, with all the love you gave.” Where 5ive (Quinn Lynch) and Jessica Jones put the soul in your playlist, your mother put you and your soul into this world. So if you tell anyone you love them on Valentine’s Day, make it your mother and be sure to thank her.

7. “If I Grew a Violet (You’d Ask for a Rose)” – Andy Sydow A Little Messed Up (2016)

Ever read the children’s book If You Give A Mouse A Cookie? This is an adult version of that tale in more ways than one. If you give a mouse a cookie, they’ll want a glass of milk. They will want something else and more after the glass of milk, so on and so forth until eternity. Sydow dishes up love pangs boiled over lost hopes in the spirit of said book. Emotionally honest, raw words of disappointed love come in, combined with loving, earnest, even sweet melody. The message delivered could interpret as one lover's greed or the other’s embittered pessimistic complacency. You can’t tell who is at fault but you can tell who fell short of the two: the “I” of the singer. It sounds at once an apology, and at once a screw you.

But this tune is also for the times everything you give or have isn’t enough. It’s a song of love exhausted and felled short. Although heartbreak does lead to some great songwriting, as Andy Sydow reminds. Thank you for breaking your open heart for us, Andy.

8. “Tilt-A-Whirl” – The RailsplittersThe Faster It Goes (2015)

If Colorado’s associated with bluegrass, The Railsplitters play a huge support role in buttressing the strong reputation and taking it on tour across the nation. Clear-ringing harmonies usher in a fast-paced minimalism foregrounding wise essentials and together, they come carrying melodies at different speeds, much as a Tilt-a-Whirl carousel making circles. Research lends insight here, for when Dusty Rider songwrites he, “writes with the full band in mind, imagining an entire song in his head before it’s even heard it out loud.” This one is a reflective reminiscence on the memories of someone who came before, but is gone now. And with mind racing, you start to question yourself and all that was.

Lauren Stoval’s lead vocals are clear as sunlight on snow, while Dusty Rider and Peter Sharpe’s alternations between plucking each note and full-bodied strumming chords lend interest and supplement with distinctive, rhythmic filler. Leslie Ziegler’s bass comes in barely, but richly, serving the more invisible role, like that of editor to writer. And of course, there’s Joe D’Esposito’s fiddle coming in on the top to send the song off into its final soars of that gloriously spinning Tilt-a-Whirl.

9.  “Someone Like Me” – SF1 Inamorata (2012)

From hand drums to lyrical repetitions, SF1 keeps their sound light, and their message relatively straightforward. There’s a serious sense in which this song seems at once upbeat, and then anything but. It’s a song that wouldn’t have to come without heartbreak, but it takes its pride on walking away in fulfilled request from another. “You’ll never find someone like me” could come out all wrong in a breakup, but the cheerful sonic delivery here gives this song a quality of what you sing in your head knowingly to comfort and uplift your own self on the walk home, giving props to your emotional regulation in honoring a request, and moving on.

10. “Bloodstream” – IoliteBloodstream (2016)

Bloodstream’s sophisticated stormy pop comes through even better on headphones, as Iolite’s (Elina Odnorlav) full-bodied indie-electronica pounces at you with confident authority. She fuses an ear, talent, and a decade of piano work with electronic assets wisely, and all at the ripe old age of seventeen. Laying down this kind of sophisticated, well-calibrated arrangement with undergirding convinces you she’s worth your ear time. The sheer carnal sensuality of this tune pulses at you with a cosmopolitan sensibility, one that makes the heart beat fast. Iolite is fierce, and if you need more proof, read BolderBeat’s interview with Odnorlav by Sierra Voss.

11. "Wait to Rust” – Kayla Marque, Kid Astronaut, Sur EllzLive and Die Like This (2016)

Triple Denver whammy! This Kayla Marque, Kid Astronaut (Jon Shockness), and Sur Ellz (Khalil Arcady) collaboration 110% comes out the most natural thing in the world. Lyrically and vocally caressing you with emotion, this trio allures in their fervent R&B/soul blend as soft finger snaps and harmonies soften your ear and melt into your heart chambers.

Marque caresses your emotions with intimacy in both lyric and lead vocals. Muted cymbal, reliant drums, and the hushed guitar unobtrusively lend rhythm, combining together and across this song to create instrumental romance and a certain sense of enchantment. The heart, bloodstream, nervous system, and muscle memory in you recognize the message: wanting something at a cellular level you know at a cognitive one is only going to destroy or undo you. Having a heart is a wonderful gift and real son of a gun, ain’t it?

12.  “They Love to Hate” – Molina Speaks, DJ Icewater Sex Money Ego (2016)

Robust, fresh beats thump and bump as they palpitate at heart rate speed. Chill, smooth, and with a pinch of lyrical sass, this one’s also purely carnal. It’s got sexy love and wantingness combined with a creed of holding-your-cool and enjoying all the spontaneous pleasures of life. It’s definitely a turn-up tune for cruising in your car, or even cooler, on your low-rider bike with the sweet speaker you should probably have. Molina Speaks and DJ Icewater have collaborated to make something seductive, both in romantic passions and in making you just want to live out loud to the full. So get to it.

13. “Lucid Recall” – Sunboy Yesterday Is in Love With You (2016)

Yes to a song that I’d enjoy instrumentally, yet do with its lyrics just the same. Sunboy give it a good 55 seconds before vocals seep in though, setting the feel first. If only we all had lucid recall, but memory doesn’t always work that way. Yet, at the same time, it’s by dint of the lyric “haven’t felt this way in a long time” that we remember: sometimes it isn’t the memory, but the feelings evoked that bring back lucid recall in all its vivid glory. And what a robust memory sensation it is when it hits.

Synthy sounds and a certain protraction allow emotions here to take flight. Vocals and piano instrumentation undergird a sound that might be tinny and emotionless otherwise, which would be the last desirable thing in a song so emotionally charged in content. Like Iolite’s “Bloodstream,” headphones are most recommended on Sunboy’s “Lucid Recall” for best up-close-and-personal vibes.  

14. “Medicine” – Rose QuartzAxis of Love (2015)

In the abstract, medicine is there to make us better. Humans are no strangers to using or abusing another person in this way at some time. Sometimes leaning on others is necessary and appropriate. But there is a difference between asking for help and being soul-suckingly co-dependent or reliant. Like a prescription drug, it can be toxic, and this song rails against the notion that one partner serves that role. You can use medicine or abuse it, and this one splits the difference.

A combination of electronic space-esque warble, full-bodied guitar notes, and clips on the drum machine set the scene. Lyrically unapologetic, this is a power number for those times you need to speak to your decision to leave someone who treats you like something to be used up rather than given to. Rose Quartz build and release tension with efficacy, establishing a subtle back and forth strain that fits the bill in the stark truths this electronic groove-pop song seeks to sing out and deliver sans apology. The only thing bigger than its sound may be the heart behind it. This is definitely one to get sassy to under lights on the dance floor, and that sounds like a great way to spend Valentine’s Day.

Make sure to follow us on Spotify to take a listen to this playlist and more Colorado music playlists at BolderBeat.

-Joliene

All songs per the artists featured. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Bonne Finken Talks To Us About Her Grammy Consideration, SXSW, & More

By: Jura Daubenspeck

It’s no mystery that the ladies of Denver’s music scene are a force to be reckoned with. And when it comes to finding a place that not only satiates your musical thirst, but also your need for some downright tasty pizza, The Walnut Room is where it’s at.

Last Saturday, ladies took over the stage at The Walnut Room for a night of indie electronica flavor. Tana Victoria, Amy Kress, Bonne Finken with DJ/backup vocalist Christine Steeples, and Phee all kept it edgy, poetic, and even a bit dark at times. The lineup consisted of mostly Colorado locals, with the exception of Iowa native Bonne Finken, who lit up the room with her booming vocals and phantasmal projections.

Each performer wowed during their time on stage, but this week, we wanted to give special props to Bonne Finken, who, despite her strong Midwest following, made her Denver debut at the show. We sat down with Bonne prior to her set to ask her a few questions about what she’s been up to, including her upcoming album, her Grammy consideration, and her plans for SXSW 2017. Here’s what she had to say:

This is your first time playing in Denver. Welcome! How are you feeling?

I feel excited! We just got done with soundcheck, and I got to hear the other artists play a bit. It sounds like we’re all in the same genre, so that’s pretty cool.

Earlier this summer you released your single and video “Speak to Me.” What have you been up to in the meantime?

I’ve been working on the new album, which will be released in 2017. “Speak to Me” was just the first release from that album. We’ve been recording, which is why I’m in Denver now. Joel Rekiel, my publicist, lined this show up for me while I was in town. I’ve been working on the album; retooling the show. It’s gone really electronic now learning a bunch of technologies, and the band is relearning gear. So that’s what we’re working on now.

You’ve been recording at The Spot Studios. How long have you been working with them?

I just went there last spring to record “Speak to Me.” And then I just started again about a week ago. I’ll be returning next spring and will hopefully have it all done by June 2017.

Bonne Finken. 

Bonne Finken. 

So what’s the experience been like this past week?

Really awesome. They’re so great to work with, and they (Glenn Sawyer and Rich Veltrop) understand my sound more than anybody I’ve worked with before. So it feels super easy. Instead of me trying to translate my sound or fight on sounds, it feels very comfortable, and goes so fast. It’s incredible! It’s been fun, relaxing and exciting.

Last time we talked, we discussed how you put your heart and soul into your music. You take the time to learn everything about every aspect of your music, so it really becomes a piece of you. I’m curious about what that process has been like, and how much of your blood, sweat, and tears will be going into this next album.

Definitely more than ever before. It’s hard to explain. Literally they’re using my own sessions and my own sounds and it’s demoed to the point where if I want a certain harmony figured out, I better have it figured out when I bring it in. [On other records] we would bring in really sketched out ideas and flush them out in the studio, where as now we bring it in and execute whatever we have, so we have to be more prepared. Which is scary and good. It goes faster, but it means whatever my idea is in real time is what they execute. So that’s been a big difference on this album. And I’ve learned a lot about MIDI. You’re able to use electronic instruments of any kind, and write with them. So that’s been very freeing for me as a writer and as an artist. I love the freeness of MIDI.

Regarding your recorded work, what can your fans expect in the coming months?

I’ll probably have a couple more singles out and promote them like I did “Speak to Me.” “Speak to Me” was kind of a campaign to try to get on the Grammy ballot, which it did do, so that was cool that we released it in time. But I’ll probably release a couple of music videos almost quietly. Not necessarily to sell, but to test out some of the sounds on the album. You’ll be hearing what’s been in my brain for the last decade but has taken me a long time to understand how to articulate audibly. I’ve always had crazy ideas, but now I feel like I can really make it happen and show that off in my music.

How will those those crazy, cool ideas be manifested in your future performances?

When I write, I keep in mind my live shows, because that’s what I love most, maybe to the detriment of thinking, “Will this song work live?” It’s important for me to get [my work] across in my live shows. So if anything, my live shows will be stronger because I keep that in mind and am able to manipulate the recordings knowing that. I like going to shows and hearing artists sound like they do in the recording, rather than not being able to recognize the song because it’s been changed too much.

Steeples (left) & Finken (right). 

Steeples (left) & Finken (right). 

Do you have any upcoming shows, or tours around the country?

We’re actually coming down into recording mode. Most winters I hole up. I don’t like to travel in bad weather. So I’ve learned to call a spade a spade, and not push it. But we are going to SXSW so I’m super stoked for that. We might just go underground a bit [this winter], write some songs, work on the show, and let SXSW be our big reveal for some of these new songs.

We can’t wait to hear more! Keep up with Bonne Finken here.

-Jura

All photos per the author. Videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Moe's BBQ Has One Tasty Lineup Planned This Thursday

By: Jura Daubenspeck

This Thursday, October 13th, Amy Kress will performing at Moe’s BBQ on South Broadway in Denver, the perfect spot for tasty eats and even tastier tunes. With the release of her album Fly this past summer, Amy’s material is fresh, vibrant, and edgy.

Amy Kress.

Amy Kress.

Amy will be joined by special guests including Leigh West, Mawule, Pearls and Perelz, and Teal and Tangent:

Leigh West.

Leigh West.

DIY electronic pop artist Leigh West pushes the boundaries of her music, with floaty melodies that keep it hypnotic and strange. Self-taught, self-developed, and classically trained, Leigh’s obsession with her craft has proven to be successful at her many gigs in Denver and Los Angeles. Her debut single “Hello Estella” made it to college radio across the nation, and acquired almost 40,000 hits on YouTube. Leigh West’s music is a smorgasbord of color, synth, and in-your-face beats.

Mawule.

Mawule.

Denver R&B artist Mawule reminds us that so much of the beauty of music comes from its ability to strengthen, empower, and connect others. His recent music video release for “Black is Beautiful (feat. Bianca Mikahn & ILL Se7en)” is gaining momentum and serves as a powerful message for our country. Mawule’s soothing vocals, gentle yet powerful stage presence, and catchy electronic beats make his music a unique experience that always elicits good vibes.

Pearls and Perelz.

Pearls and Perelz.

Solo artist Olivia Perez, otherwise known as, Pearls and Perelz is a mystery yet to be unveiled. Her ethereal, abstract sound strays from congruity and encourages the exploration of the mind’s dark corners. Pearls and Perelz keeps it cool, slow, haunting, and trance-like. Her music creeps up slowly and brings out the moodiest of feels.

Teal and Tangent.

Teal and Tangent.

Dubbed as “dark indietronica,” Teal and Tangent represent the half-dream half-awake fogginess that occurs in the depth of the night. Made up of rocker Adrienne Osborn (vocals) and Alex Moroz (keys, Ableton), this duo casts their dreamy poetry onto an effervescent journey into space. Teal and Tangent invites you to get lost in their rhythms, and listen with closed eyes.

Thursday night’s lineup is a downright interesting, eclectic combination of varying electronica artists, all sent to bring an added boost to the tail end of your week. So if you’re feeling moody and groovy, be sure to make it out to Denver’s Moe’s BBQ this Thursday at 8:30PM! Tickets are on sale now; grab them while you can.

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Nederland's Caribou Room Lines Up Locals for a Night of Tunes

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Things are going to get funky at Nederland's Caribou Room this weekend.

Nederland's Caribou Room. 

Nederland's Caribou Room. 

This Saturday, June 4th, Nederland’s Caribou Room will be hosting two local acts for your entertainment. It’s the first time this new(ish) venue has solely featured local talent for a night of music, so to mark the occasion, we’re bringing you info on both of the bands involved:

Technicolor Tone Factory.

Technicolor Tone Factory.

Opening up the night at Caribou is Boulder’s own Technicolor Tone Factory! The “effervescent funk and heavy progressive rock” five-piece have built a strong local following in recent years, and will be breaking out some funky sounds for their Caribou debut. Members Bryan LeFever (drums), Greg Kalifa (keys/organ/vocals), Cameron Canepa (guitar/vocals), Karl Summers (bass/vocals), and Evan Morris (keys/synth) are fresh off of some time in the booth at KMG, where they are recording their first studio album. TTF are pumped to play some of what they’ve been working on in the studio live, so head over and check out their new music! They’ve promised a high-energy set with lots of groovability.

Malai Llama.

Malai Llama.

Following TTF, Rollinsville’s Malai Llama will take the stage, a dance/fusion four-piece who like to combine “jazz, rock, and electronica in a psychedelic fusion”. The self-acclaimed jam band is comprised of Steven Govanlu, Chris Cornwall, John DeSousa, and Matt Flaherty. Together, the four like to “push musical boundaries by combining the energy of instrumentation with electronic exploration”, aka, they’ve got sweet synths and boomin’ turntables injected into their sound, along with their traditional instruments of guitar, bass, and drums. It’s rumored that it’s impossible to sit still at a Malai Llama show, so come ready to party!

Grab full details on this Caribou Room show here and head to Ned this weekend!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured.

Bury the Doubt Brings Electronic Punk To Oklahoma With Their New Single "Cast Away"

By: Jura Daubenspeck

Bury the Doubt is bringing electronic punk to their hometown and beyond.

Nestled in the small town of Newkirk, OK, you’ll find the band Bury the Doubt, who are determined to make a name for electronic punk in a town that is overgrown with country music.

Oklahoma's Bury the Doubt.

Oklahoma's Bury the Doubt.

It all started with a screamo band called River Parade, made up of Josh Layton and Cade Peterson. Then about a year ago, the two decided to focus more on an acoustically-oriented sound and change their name to Bury the Doubt. Now the six-piece band is made up of original members Josh Layton (vocals/songwriter/ukulele) and Cade Peterson (drums), along with longtime friend Shahannah Wilkie (piano), Matthew Colsen (guitar), Colby Burke (guitar), and Drayton Oldfield (DJ).

Buskin'.

Buskin'.

Like many up and coming bands, Bury the Doubt deal with the struggles of lack of rehearsal space and a tight budget, so they have had to get creative. They practice in living rooms and jam out in their cars on the open road, and when they recorded their first album Love Hate & Other Sins (2015), they had to make every minute count. The studio charged by the hour, so they got to work and even recorded the song "Lela" in one take.

Listen to Bury the Doubt's album Love Hate & Other Sins:

They group just recorded their latest single "Cast Away" at The Spot Studios in Lakewood, CO. The song itself sounds playful, but touches on some deeper feelings of rejection and longing. It speaks to those who have felt cast out and feel that being alone is sometimes easier than allowing yourself to be judged. It’s one of those songs that you find yourself isolating various sounds in it as you listen, and just when you think you’ve figured it all out, they manage to change it up again. The lyrical maturity also takes the song to a very vivid level:

Lift my skin and you might find
A sunken ship left behind
In hopes of treasure to finally save the free
Packed up in a wooden crate
Shipped away a day too late
To an island only the dead could ever see.

“Cast Away” is a single off Bury the Doubt’s upcoming album The Tale of Two Tragedies. They are launching their Kickstarter campaign this Saturday, May 14th, in order to raise funds to record the album. They will be offering exclusive reward packages for supporters, including: a signed copy of the album, Bury the Doubt logo beanies, band posters, VIP tickets to the album release show (or a show of the guest’s choosing), original artwork for select song titles, backstage passes, a chance to be a "Rockstar For A Day," and much more.

High-fives all around for new sounds.

High-fives all around for new sounds.

Once again, Bury the Doubt is looking to adapt their sound and form a new genre, incorporating electronica, punk, and the sounds of Gothic Transylvania into their odes for those who want to listen. So be on the look out for their musical makings, as they show you a side of them you haven’t seen before. Check out their Facebook for upcoming announcements.

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited.