LA's Recent Daybreaker Was Filled With A Little Extra Love

By: Benjamin Tillis

Did you know that the secret to having an energized, supercharged day is... waking up at 5AM? It’s true! On Valentine’s Day morning, I crawled out of bed before the crack of dawn to attend Los Angeles’ Valentine’s Day Daybreaker. Both a yoga session and a dance party, Daybreaker is a series of almost exclusively early morning social gatherings geared towards music lovers, social butterflies, and the health conscious. The end result: a fun-filled, completely unique experience that left me skipping back to my car excited about my drive to work.

26910377_10100282275130594_5495494024554304214_o.jpg

To start off the event at 530AM, roughly 50 attendees rolled out their yoga mats in the event space at Joseph’s Café, located in the heart of Hollywood. Sympathetic to the fact that most of us were still waking up, the yoga session was low-intensity and lighthearted. It was a perfect way to loosen and wake up before the big dance party. As soon as 630AM came around, the door opened to those who came just to break a sweat dancing, and several healthy food and beverage brands set up free samples of their products, including Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods, RxBar, and Noosa Yogurt. Delicious.

Copy of Photo_Credit_AndrewRauner (1).jpg

Once my stomach was full, I joined the rest of the event-goers on the dance floor, which was illuminated with various colorful lights. In the theme of love and light, we were encouraged to wear clothes and accessories that lit up, making it a beautiful scene of glowing good vibes. For two straight hours we danced to DJ Eric Sharp, who played upbeat jams. Periodically, he was accompanied by a trumpet or saxophone player or a rapper, making it an eclectic set that kept us moving the entire time. You couldn’t turn your head without seeing big smiles and new connections being made on the dance floor.

Daybreaker_1_10_18_AJRphotos_Previews_064 (1).jpg

The event closed with a short meditation focused on love and our intent for the week, which was a good way to relax before getting the rest of the day started. Check out Daybreaker’s next LA event, an early morning silent disco boat party on March 13th! Get your tickets here!

-Benjamin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: The Host Club Release Catchy Electropop Record 'Flash of Life'

By: Trevor Ryan

Colorado electronic trio The Host Club have just dropped their sophomore record Flash of Life, and it makes me feel absolutely everything all at once.

The Host Club started out in 2009 as just three brothers ready to take it all on. They played gigs throughout Colorado and eventually found a place within the airwaves in 2014, when they debuted Coincidence, a full length album featuring ten tracks.

The Host Club.

The Host Club.

Now, with Flash of Life, we have an emotional, phenomenally catchy record, described as an ode to their chocolate lab “Worf.” I found myself sonically immersed in tracks like “Constellations,” “If I Forget,” and “Come Apart.” There are these big, emotional moments introduced to us with strong hooks and “cut through you” melodies, but you also get a sense of happier times as well.

You’ll find a less emotionally broken taste in tracks like “Flash of Life,” “Stay The Same,” and “Undefeated.” These songs slam you with sticky hooks and more poppy, electro-vibes. From the instrumentals to their butter-smooth vocals, at times I’m reminded on this record of popular music’s Owl City era. Only this is better.

22528520_1703279126410646_7645294696311005125_n.jpg

To me, The Host Club’s record feels like it’s ready for your upcoming summer playlist because I definitely get road trip vibes the whole way through. Be sure to keep up with The Host Club on BandCampFacebook, and SoundCloud for more music and their next slew of shows.

I'll be catching one in a flash.

-Trevor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Poets & Wolves Bring Their Alternative Indie Dance Pop Sound Alive At Denver Show

By: Nathan Sheppard

Poets & Wolves played Your Mom's House last week, with Adventure Nothing and The Ugly Architect. The intimate show started with a mix of original songs and solid covers by Adventure Nothing. Then The Ugly Architect, an outfit from Fort Collins, took the stage and bumped up the energy with their exuberant performance style and fun-loving stage presence.

Poets & Wolves.

Poets & Wolves.

The Greeley-based band Poets & Wolves finished off the night with a solid set. The alternative indie four-piece use a wide variety of influences and genres to create a sound unique to themselves. They mix slow, melodic bass with catchy guitar riffs to get you dancing while simultaneously keeping alt chill elements strong throughout their catchy, grooving tunes.

The group opened their set with songs from their debut EP To The Moon, having only released two double-single records prior. Poets & Wolves also did a cover of Linkin Park's “Waiting For The End” with their own alt emo twist. They topped off the night with one of their older singles, “Pretty Little Mess,” which sent the night off with a stomping frenzy.

Poets & Wolves (2).jpg

You can stream Poets & Wolves’ music on all platforms and keep up with them on Facebook. Though this was the band’s last show of 2017, you can see them January 11th at Globe Hall with Stereoshifter, Echoes In Reverie, and Wolf Poets.

-Nathan

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Daybreaker Is Officially The Best Way To Wake Up

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Last Thursday, I woke up at 5AM to don my best fur vest with some of Boulder’s happiest people. Yoga mat in hand, I headed to the Boulder Theater for what was the earliest door time I’d ever attended: a spry 6AM. Though it was still dark outside when I arrived, the inside of one of Boulder’s best concert venues was glowing. Ticket-checkers greeted everyone who entered with a hug and a twinkling, “Welcome to Daybreaker!” It was hard to keep even the most “I’m-not-a-morning-person” from smiling.

Inside the theater, DJ Falcon Punch was spinning disco funk tunes. Around me, people were spreading out yoga mats where concert-goers normally post up with a beer to catch a band. There was a lot of faux fur happening, and alongside it, yogis in onesies ranging from your classic Christmas pajama look to your Ninja Turtle of choice. Though it was early, there was no sign of sleep. People were ready to party.

Yoga Pod’s Dan Carbonell and Rob Loud led the morning sun salutations just as the horizon was lighting up outside. They made the practice playful while DJ Falconpunch continued to throw down some fun, meditative grooves for those long-held plank poses. Loud even recommended twerking during saddle pose, and more than one Daybreaker attendee took him up on it.

0K7A5919-2.jpg

After yoga, the bar opened at 7AM with a selection of green juice and tea. There were temporary tattoo stations and face-painting. More penguins, tigers, and unicorns twirled into the venue as the event's emcee, Drew Wyman from Shinesty, beckoned attendees to dance. Which they did. For the next TWO HOURS before most of them hit their day jobs. Somehow, the positive and creative space that Daybreaker fosters with this event will leave you more energized than any morning Starbucks ever could. The event almost feels like a mini Bonnaroo high-five session, jam-packed with love and positive vibes. People left the theater shining with gratitude and smiles, and though I rarely leave a music venue any other way, this was different. I actually questioned if I might be a morning person thanks to Daybreaker.

Daybreaker is coming back to Colorado, in Boulder Thursday, January 11th (details TBA) and in Denver at Club Vinyl on Wednesday, January 17th. Get tickets here and get to it! You don’t want to (hit) snooze on this one.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Cody Munro Moore's 'Perfume Nights' Will Give You All The Right 80s Feels

By: Adrian DeSimone

Australian artist Cody Munro Moore is clearly a millennial, even if he’s not. His music is a little bit of this and a little bit of that, a sound that hearkens to something specific but upon deeper reflection, carries notes of a vast array of influences that inevitably create his own unique flavor of 80s inspired alt pop. These elements are evident on his new record, Perfume Nights.

On “Just Don’t Need It Enough,” he carries Joe Strummer’s heavily reverbed, almost wailing tone from The Clash’s early days. The sonic space given in the middle part of the song allows the listener to ponder a scene of their choosing, letting the echoes bounce around their own imagination, right as the song builds back in to get you grooving again. Moore does this beautiful balancing act between blending upbeat danciness and spatial vibes.

 

No Matter How Hard” borrows some notes from The Cure in vocals, as well as some modern influences like Tame Impala on the bass line, but again one can’t shake the visions of The Clash on this record. There is a fond sentimentality as Moore embraces the rawness of punk sensibility with a stronger emphasis on a “prettier” sound (reverb, echoes, distant horns), which is what always endeared me to those formative Clash albums. There is also a roughness to Moore’s voice that he doesn’t try to hide- in fact emphasizing those notes give his voice that special quality. Where someone like King Krule goes all the way, Moore is more subtle, allowing the glowing production to exist in the same sonic forum.  

Cody Munro Moore.

Cody Munro Moore.

On “Gold Watches,” Moore goes all in on the 80s feel. Echoing sax lines and unintentional visions of traveling through the city are almost reminiscent of Bruce Springsteen, the king of sentimentality. What I love most about Moore is that while he clearly has an audible aesthetic built around a relatively recognizable sound, there are so many bits and pieces of his influence that make these songs a cut above. Check out Perfume Nights above and purchase the vinyl through Dinosaur City Records

Keep up with Cody Munro Moore here

-Adrian

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Old Traditions in New Times: CROMA Festival Echoes History

By: Riley Ann

In the heat of summer, hundreds of people from the East and West Coasts and beyond gathered in the hills outside Berthoud, Colorado to celebrate the traditions of Old-time music and dance.

A jam at the CROMA 2017 merch table.

A jam at the CROMA 2017 merch table.

The Central Rockies Old-Time Music Association (CROMA) celebrated its 8th annual festival at Parrish Ranch, and while for some, barn dances and pre-World War II fiddle tunes may seem anachronistic in 2017, this property offers the perfect environment to stop time and celebrate these traditions. In fact, that’s exactly what the property was established for over half a century ago.

The late 1950s were more than ice cream socials, Elvismania, and record parties. It was one of the contemporary heydays of Old-time music and square dancing. Competitive square dancing was serious business for some, and in 1958, Vaughn Parrish built a barn on his ranch specifically for square dancing. People flocked in from across the United States (even beyond the border from Canada) to spend a week or two practicing their square dancing skills. Many of them competed in square dance competitions throughout the nation.

Terry Parrish, the current owner of Parrish Ranch and son of Jean & Vaughn.

Terry Parrish, the current owner of Parrish Ranch and son of Jean & Vaughn.

Today, Vaughn’s son Terry runs Parrish Ranch and is thrilled to host the annual CROMA fest as well as weddings, camping outings, and other special events throughout the year. At the Friday night barn dance, Terry stepped up to the microphone and shared, “My mother and father would be so happy to know that this festival happens on their property. It’s exactly what this place was built for.” The crowd cheered, and Terry even joined squares throughout the night, laughing and chatting with attendees, which included ticket-holders alongside the festival’s performers.

This year’s festival brought various scholars and performers of Old-time from across the nation, predominantly the Ozark and Appalachian regions of the United States, to offer diverse programming throughout the weekend.

Callers and cloggers: Phil Jamison & Dot Kent join the New Smokey Valley Boys for a number.

Callers and cloggers: Phil Jamison & Dot Kent join the New Smokey Valley Boys for a number.

Phil Jamison, author of Hoedowns, Reels, and Frolics: Roots and Branches of Southern Appalachian Dance and professor of mathematics and Appalachian music and dance at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina, taught a workshop on flatfoot dancing (also known as clogging). He shared how not only Old-time music, but also flatfooting and square dancing, have rich African-American roots, and how those traditions merged with European and new innovative styles in the time to create a rich tradition that’s truly American.

The Ozark Highballers had a friend join their show for some flatfooting.

The Ozark Highballers had a friend join their show for some flatfooting.

Kim Lansford and Aviva Steigmeyer (of Preservation Guitar Company and performer with the Ozark Highballers) shared the histories and nuances of ballads and led a sing-along in a workshop before performing a set together on stage.

The New Smokey Valley Boys had callers; flatfooters Dot Kent and Phil Jamison join them.

The New Smokey Valley Boys had callers; flatfooters Dot Kent and Phil Jamison join them.

The New Smokey Valley Boys offered a workshop on fiddle/banjo duets, a common means of instrumentation for house parties when, as fiddler Andy Edmonds described, “They’d throw all the furniture out in the yard and have the fiddler and banjo player face each other knee to knee in the doorway between two rooms, and each room would have a caller, so they’d have two different dances happening, but everyone could hear the same music.”

Jesse & Emily.

Jesse & Emily.

Jesse Milnes and Emily Miller offered several workshops, spanning duet singing, fingerstyle guitar, and West Virginia fiddling in addition to performing sweet, heartbreaking, and foot-stomping duets.

The Saturday night cakewalk was a hit. The music stopped just in time for this festival-goer! 

The Saturday night cakewalk was a hit. The music stopped just in time for this festival-goer! 

With over 30 workshops, daily main stage performances, nightly barn dances, kids’ programming, and community meals (a Thursday potluck and a Sunday morning pancake breakfast), this year’s festival continued to expand upon the quaint beginnings of the CROMA into one of the best festivals in Colorado, and arguably the best Old-time festival in the nation.

Aviva Steigmeyer & Roy Pilgrim of the Ozark Highballers join in on the festival dancing.

Aviva Steigmeyer & Roy Pilgrim of the Ozark Highballers join in on the festival dancing.

While you count down to next year’s festival in 2018, you can keep up with CROMA’s barn dances, fundraisers, and other special events on their website and by signing up for their newsletter. Dances throughout the front range can be found here, which also includes the Westminster dance, the only regularly scheduled dance that mixes squares, contras, reels, and circle dances.

-Riley

Find out more about Riley on her blog.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Malai Llama Lit Up The Fox Theatre's Stage Like A Wild Fire

By: Jura Daubenspeck

Spring has sprung, and Colorado has been keeping it as colorful as ever with vibrant sunsets, cool breezes, and music that won’t quit. Friday night at the Fox Theatre was one for the books, as experimental rock’s bad mama jamas The Malai Llama put on a headlining performance that exploded with color and rhythm.

The Malai Llama at The Fox Theatre last weekend. Photo Credit:   Kaotic Design Productions

The Malai Llama at The Fox Theatre last weekend. Photo Credit: Kaotic Design Productions

The venue was packed with new grads and rascals alike, all greeting the weekend with smiles, twirls, and yes- even a few dance-offs. Local improvisational rock group Intergalactic Peace Jelly took to the stage first, inviting attendees onto their spacecraft and blasting off for the night. Their experimental, jam-heavy set was the perfect launching point for the remaining performances.

The second act, Woodshed Red, brought up the energy in a totally different way, covering a variety of songs, with my personal favorites being “Ramble On,” “Nuthin’ But a G’Thang,” and “Colt 45.” The way they incorporated the fiddle and standup bass to create gritty twists to classic tunes made my heart sing.

By the time The Malai Llama took the stage, the crowd was fired up and ready to be wooed- and this band absolutely did not disappoint. There were so many aspects of Malai Llama’s set that blew me away: Jennifer Hartswick’s slay-worthy vocals in the “Immigrant Song” cover, the band’s mesmerizing onstage chemistry, and of course, the incredible lightwork with colors galore. However, what stood out to me the most was their dynamic force that made each song so unique. They managed to fill their two-hour set with so many different emotions and energies, playing songs such as “Allocamelus,” “Gentle Giant,” and “Cockeyed.” They toyed with metal-like riffs, hip-swaying funk beats, and electrifying dance music. Progressions were seamless, and no two songs sounded the same, leaving the crowd feeling satiated and at peace.

The band finished their performance with a cover of Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds,” which had everyone embracing and feeling the love. The vibes were strong on Friday, as The Malai Llama welcomed the crowd acapella sing-along to their closing song.

Jennifer Hartswick. Photo Credit:   Kaotic Design Productions

Jennifer Hartswick. Photo Credit: Kaotic Design Productions

As an established musical dynamo within the Colorado scene, The Malai Llama has fearlessly put their killer chromatic tunes out in the world for all to hear. Their music moves as freely as the wild winds of Colorado, and the even wilder people living here. Be sure to check them out next time they hit the stage!

Connect with The Malai Llama on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

-Jura

All photos per Kaotic Design Productions. All videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Boogie Down at Euforquestra’s Fort Funk at The Aggie Theatre This Friday

By: Benjamin Jewell

As you are undoubtedly bummed-out about this weekend's weather and wondering how to wipe that frown from your face, I will now give you the prescription for your woes: Fort Funk. I am sure you’ve listened and danced to Euforquestra (EUF) at one time or another. If you haven’t, press pause on your Jock Jams CD and prepare to groove all night. If you are a fan, this is the last time you’ll be able to see this band live for awhile in Colorado, and with special guest Eddie Roberts of The New Mastersounds sitting in, maybe ever.

Proof that Eddie Roberts can jam:

Let me give you a few more reasons why you need to head to this show. The night opens with Moves At Midnight. This quintet is the special reward for coming around 9ish. You’ll get a funky-pop-soul instrumental feel and if you want awesome vocals, those are right here. If you close your eyes, you’ll swear Adam Levine’s much cooler guitar-wailing brother is fronting this band. Enough said.

Denver based TNERTLE will step up next to deliver some electro funk hip-hop. They’ll likely dip into their album MataMata, and hopefully play “Dance All Night.” You’ll get vocal harmonies, rap, horns, and a rhythm section that is reminiscent of Flobots. Come ear hungry, for this show will be a musical buffet.

Euforquestra will light you up this Friday with FIRE:

Then, as if Christmas and your birthday had a baby and it’s name was Euforquestra ft. Eddie Roberts, it gets better. I last heard EUF in Iowa City more than ten years ago and they’ve never disappointed. Their newest album, FIRE, and hopefully one of Eddie Roberts’ tunes from The Nashville Session will be on the set list. The combination of these two powerhouses is going to be really special. If you fancy yourself a budding guitarist or musician you should come for the inspiration alone.

EUF.

EUF.

I recommend getting your tickets in advance right here. I’ll see you there and we can forget about the bad weather together.

-Benjamin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

This Party Was For Dancing: All Chiefs' EP Release Show at The Squire Lounge

By: Mirna Tufekcic

All Chiefs want you to dance all night. At least, that’s what happened at their EP release party at The Squire Lounge in Denver last Friday. Oh, and they want you to drink. But we’ll come back to that. First, let’s start with the dancing.

The party started with Already Sweaty, a local DJ spinning 70s and 80s pop songs who has been known to open many an All Chiefs’ show. And I can see why. This guy sure knows how to kick off a party! Already Sweaty had people slowly starting to gather for the main show while it was still light outside. I was definitely feeling his grooves as I smoked my cigarette on the patio looking in. The early crowd even formed a dance circle, busting moves before the sun went down.

BOX.

BOX.

BOX, a Denver-based folky blues rock band took the stage next for some tunes. A few songs in, the band played “Wasted”, and it went like this: “We’re all on our way to wasted/tomorrow’s hangover will come too soon”. I was starting to see the pattern here: drinking with dancing to follow. Halfway through their set, BOX put actual cardboard boxes over their heads, and closed with a couple of harder sounds. The crowd looked pleased. It was time for the main event.

All Chiefs.

All Chiefs.

When All Chiefs started to set up onstage, the patio became packed. The night was finally in full swing. Every corner around the bar inside was lined with thirsty, chatty folk, eager to hear the five-piece’s set. Drummer Ben Batchelor’s words from earlier in the evening echoed in my mind, and I laughed thinking about how he said the band intentionally start their sets at the “critical mass of drunkenness.” That’s when the first song started, the track “Collecting Dust” from their brand-spanking new EP Fashion Forward. As I made my way toward the front of the stage, All Chiefs then started in on their cover of Ace of Base’s “The Sign”. And being a 90’s kid, that had me hooked.

All Chiefs' Set List + Illicits.

All Chiefs' Set List + Illicits.

Beyond the booze and all the moves, it’s worth mentioning that Mic Carroll, lead vocalist of the band, has an amazing voice. I knew this guy a few years back from karaoke Wednesdays at the now defunct Catacombs in Boulder, where he ran the gig. I stood back, remembering how Carroll would grab the mic to do a cover, and it instantly became clear to everyone present that he wasn’t just your regular karaoke fan. Way to let your soul outchy’er mouth, Mic!

A few more songs from Fashion Forward followed, and the floor was hot! In fact, Carroll prefaced one track by saying, “This song is about dancing. Just think of it like an alien invasion, except instead of them taking over, they just want you to dance!” Did the crowd and I boogie? Yes; yes we did.

Watch All Chiefs' music video for their single, "Pusher":

The crowd cheered when the band called the end of the show, and an encore chant began. All Chiefs closed with a bangin’ cover of LCD Soundsystem’s “Dance Yrself Clean”, a track that just couldn’t have been a more perfect ending to their captivating show.

All Chiefs are so worth seeing live, and their next show is July 14th at Mile High SpiritsThey’re a fun, dancey rock band whose songs easily stick with you. Their music is heartfelt, and that’s evidenced best when you get to watch them bop and groove onstage, instruments in hand. As Justen Howard, guitarist/vocals for the band said, “We’re having so much fun and we want everyone who comes to see us to have fun too!” So go have fun with these guys soon, and in the meantime, listen to their great new release Fashion Forward.  

-Mirna

All photos per the author; embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat. 

Envy Alo: A Danceable Fusion

By: Will Baumgartner

"It never ceases to amaze me what three people can do with a guitar, drums and a Hammond organ. I recently got the opportunity to master Envy Alo's new EP and I was excited to hear so many great rock, funk, and hip hop influences, all wrapped up into their own unique sound. I can't wait to see what these cats come up with next and really hope I can be a part of it!"

-Alan Evans, Soulive

There you have it from the mouth of Alan Evans, the drummer of Soulive, one of the most popular jazz/funk fusion bands on the planet: Envy Alo, a trio of young Front Range musicians, are already well on their way to a bright future after only eight months of existence as a group. While their instrumentation is the same as Soulive, and they obviously share a lot of the same influences and tastes, these boys definitely have their own distinctive thing going on: a stew of jazz, funk, rock that is not only technically impressive, but tremendously exciting and infectious, and definitely dance-friendly. I couldn’t stop moving the last time I saw them live!

In anticipation for Envy Alo’s upcoming performance in The Pamlico Sound’s latest Funkstravaganza (five funk bands in one night at Cervantes’ Other Side this Saturday, June 18th), I recently spoke with keyboardist Aaron Pettine and guitarist/vocalist Kevin Hinder to get some insights into their process, progress, and plans. Check it out:

You guys have been around for less than a year and are already making pretty big noise on the local scene. How did your group come together, and what do you think were the key elements in your rapid rise?

Aaron: Kevin and I knew each other from attending James Madison University in Virginia for our undergrad studies. After we both relocated to Boulder, we met Tyler Gwynn (drummer) through mutual friends. After a few jam sessions with him, we knew we had a unique sound and chemistry and decided to move forward as a band.

Tyler and I both had been playing in other Front Range bands for a while now (Booster and Tenth Mountain Division respectively), so that helped us attract some of the fans from those bands to see this new project. We had developed great relationships with many of the local venues too, who were gracious enough to offer Envy Alo opening slots and gigs within our first few months of being a band.

Kevin: Another key element was just the initial drive that we wanted to do something different. A lot of bands in the area have that typical “jam band” sound, and we really wanted to create something unique. We had the tools already in place individually to do something new, and so far it seems like people enjoy it!

Kevin Hinder.

Kevin Hinder.

With your unusual and rather sparse lineup- keyboards, guitar and, drums- you create a very full, rich sound. How do you accomplish this?

Aaron: It’s simple really: add a synth bass line, swirling organ chords, furiously fast, yet tasteful jazz-rock guitar licks, and a danceable funky drum groove, and boom, that’s our sound!

Speaking of sound, I hear echoes of a lot of familiar sounds and styles within Envy Alo. The obvious comparison would be to the great funk-jazz trio Soulive, but not all your influences seem to be so contemporary. Some of the “organ trio” groups of the 60’s come to mind, as well as the solid classic groove of Booker T. & the MG’s. Who have some of your main influences been, both compositionally and in your individual styles as players?

Aaron: As a keyboard player, it's legends like Jimmy Smith, Booker T., Herbie Hancock, and Stevie Wonder. I also got a lot of my influences from current players like Neal Evans (Soulive/Lettuce), and Beau Sasser (Kung Fu) as well. I’d say my biggest influence is John Medeski from Medeski Martin & Wood, who I was lucky enough to study under in 2015.

Kevin: When I was a kid, I went through a heavy Hendrix phase, and was into heavier rock and the blues. But as I got a little older I started listening to bands like Phish and Widespread Panic, Derek Trucks, and Umphrey's McGee. I would say Jimmy Herring is probably my favorite guitar player out there, but when I really started studying music, my focus shifted to jazz with players like Pat Metheny and John Scofield (probably #2 to Jimmy Herring for me).

Aaron Pettine. 

Aaron Pettine. 

Your music is rewarding on both an intellectual level and a visceral one. Musicians get plenty to appreciate in terms of skill and complexity, while your average concertgoer gets a solid dose of dance music. Has this been a conscious thing? How do you approach creating music like this?

Aaron: [It has] absolutely been a conscious thing. We want to challenge ourselves in the music we write, but we also want it to be accessible and fun for the listener and concertgoer. Finding that happy medium can sometimes be the toughest part but it's one of the great joys of writing our own music.

One of the things that keeps your music interesting and exciting is while your primary focus is clearly on the funk/jazz side of the spectrum, there are also occasional flavors of rock. Where does this varietal spice come from?

Kevin: I think listening to an extremely wide range of styles helps us to draw on those influences and place some of that into our own sounds. Whether it’s conscious or not, it definitely comes through in all of our playing and writing. A Tribe Called Quest is a big influence in that regard, since they mold hip-hop with jazz, funk, rock, and more all into their sound.

Tyler Gwynn.

Tyler Gwynn.

Yet another thing that sets Envy Alo apart is the fact that not all of your stuff is strictly instrumental; you have some actual songs with well-written and interesting lyrics. What songwriters have influenced you?

Kevin: I’ve been listening to Jim Croce a good bit lately, and his lyrics are so well developed, funny, and his flow is so good. The obvious ones come to mind [too]: Lennon/McCartney, Jagger/Richards. I also love Jerry Joseph. The imagery in his writing is so strong and deep, you can tell he has really been through some shit and has a lot of demons and skeletons in his closet, so pulling on his writing is big for me.

Do your compositions come completely realized from individual band members, or are they more often group efforts?

Aaron: It’s a little bit of everything. A lot of earlier tunes came to be through us just jamming, liking something, and putting some structure to it. Recently, Kevin and I have been doing a lot of writing on our own, either chord structures or lyrics or both, and then we get together and finish it up with Tyler.

Listen to Envy Alo's debut EP One Time

I’m very excited for your performance at The Pamlico Sound’s Funkstravaganza show this Saturday. Can the audience expect any special treats from y’all at that performance?

Aaron: Yes! We will have some special treats in store. We are very excited to play our first show as Envy Alo at Cervantes’- it’s one of our favorite Denver venues!

What the hell does “Envy Alo” mean, anyway?

Aaron: It’s a play off of the Spanish word “envialo” which means “ship it”. It’s a term we use when we need to spur one of us to really rock something.

Kevin: Basically, we just replace every verb related to doing anything with “ship it”.

Watch Envy Alo's live performance of "Manic Depression":

I never could have figure that one out on my own! So what’s on the horizon for Envy Alo? Where do you see yourselves a year from now? Anything our readers should know about in advance?

Kevin: We have a summer full of dates we’re ready to announce soon, and we will be playing some of the bigger local venues too, so we’re pretty jazzed about that. We were just booked to play at a music festival in Taos, NM in September, which will be our first festival. Sometime in the fall, we plan on recording a full length album. We’ve been talking to Al Evans from Soulive about recording in his studio out East, so we have some pretty lofty goals. We’re ready to dive in headfirst and become the best and most unique band we can be!

So make sure to “ship it” with Envy Alo and all of the great funk bands on the Funkstravaganza lineup this Saturday at Cervantes! Keep up with Envy Alo on Facebook.

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 05/13 & 05/14

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Graduation is over and summer has begun! Let’s get to it Beaters:

Today (Friday 05/13):

Grandpa’s Gun Spring Party, featuring Open Space and Francis and the Wolf at Shine Gathering Place in Boulder 8PM-Close

Get yer gun grandpa.

Get yer gun grandpa.

Boulder’s Americana outfit Grandpa’s Gun are holding down the Shine stage tonight, joined by alt-country “outlaw bluegrass” band Open Space and Longmont’s rock’n’roll trio Francis and the Wolf. Grandpa’s Gun dropped their debut full-length album, Back Into Town, last October with critical acclaim. Tonight’s show offers a sweet local lineup to sip to, and it’s only $5 at the door. Head over and check these bands out!

Check out the video for Granpa’s Gun track “Snakebite”:

All Chiefs Release Show & Music Video Premiere at The Lazy Dog in Boulder 830PM-Close

All chiefs.

All chiefs.

All Chiefs is back! The Boulder/Denver indie rock and dance pop five-piece have returned to the local music scene after a hiatus, during which it’s rumored they were recording their new EP Fashion Forward. Tonight, the band is premiering their new single, “Pusher”, and its official music video, live at The Lazy Dog. Following the premiere, the band will take the stage (shared by Tyto Alba) for a night of new music, and old favorites. Fashion Forward will be available on CD, which gives you the chance to check out All Chiefs’ new music before it drops across the interwebs. Head over to this show and check out their new tunes!

Watch All Chiefs at Coupe Studios, recording their new EP:

Asalott at Taco Junky & Tequila Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

Local beatbreak and tribal dance favorite Asalott is ringing in the start of summer tonight at Taco Junky. The sometimes duo/trio/four-piece recently spent some time recording their first album, and tonight, they hinted to us that their new music might be available for purchase. So roll up to TJ’s on The Hill for a bumpin’ party and Asalott’s new sounds!. It’s gonna be a killer show. Want to read more about Asalott? Check out our exclusive sit-down with the crew.

Watch Asalott’s music video for their tune “Remedies”:

Realtalk at Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub in Boulder 10PM-Close

12672177_898808186902703_9110613584495947734_o.jpg

Boulder’s own funk rock/reggae jam four-piece Realtalk are taking over Conor’s tonight and partying with you until the sun (almost) comes up! The local band, who originally gained popularity by playing CU house parties, have had quite the year. They’ve released new music videos, played the Fox, and tonight, they’ll be playing some new tunes for you! Jump over to Conor’s on your Pearl crawl and see these guys live. Read our exclusive interview with the band.

Watch Realtalk’s live performance of “Tied Up”:

Tomorrow (Saturday 05/14):

The Pamlico Sound at The Lazy Dog in Boulder 10PM-Close

13124851_1021195574584668_800636809259753381_n.png

Funkadelic and dancin’ good time band The Pamlico Sound will be raging at The Lazy Dog tomorrow evening. The eight-member, horn-infused funk band always bring a massive crowd to their shows, and an energy that will make you move until the joint shuts down. TPS are stoked to have a local performance on their busy schedule, so come prepared for a crazy congregation! We’ll see you there! Check out our exclusive chat with TPS frontman Pastor Will B.

Watch The Pamlico Sound live on Radio1190:

Tilia Americana and All Hat No Horse at The Laughing Goat in Boulder 8PM-Close

Tilia Americana.

Tilia Americana.

Denver duo All Hat No Horse will be opening things up at the LG tomorrow. Their acoustic Americana sounds are sure to croon you into the start of Saturday night, followed by Longmont’s acoustic two-piece Tilia Americana, who weave elements of folk, blues, rock, and country into their sound. Grab a tasty latte and check out these local acts!

Peep Tilia Americana’s music video for “What Happened?”:

BCFM

Boulder County Farmers Market is every Saturday from 10AM-2PM. We’re working closely with BCFM to promote the music at the market, and this week, acoustic mountain blues group Ravin’Wolf will be providing your entertainment. Stop by to hear their “true folk rock traditions” and grab brunch from one of the many delicious vendors on site!

Listen to Ravin’Wolf:

GREEN LIGHT RADIO

This week, our Sunday partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions will feature a track by Longmont’s Francis and the Wolf. The trio recently changed their name, added a new member, and are making new music. Tune in to any of the Colorado Community Network Radio Stations here (95.3 or 95.5 Boulder) or stream Green Light Sunday night between 9-10PM to catch their song “Ol’ Lady” on the airwaves.

See you in the sun!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. 

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 04/22 & 04/23

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Less snow. More shows. Here’s to the weekend!

Today (Friday 04/22):

Billy Shaddox Band at Vindication Brewing in Boulder 530PM-Close

Billy shaddox.

Billy shaddox.

We love easing our way into the weekend. And tonight you can do just that with Billy Shaddox and his band at Vindication! A Boulder transplant by way of California, Shaddox has been playing shows around the Front Range for awhile now. Last summer, he released the LP I Melt, I Howl, produced and engineered by Sam Kassirer (Josh Ritter, Lake Street Dive, Langhorne Slim). We will actually be dropping an exclusive feature on Shaddox soon, so that’s all we’ll say for now! Start your Friday early and get to this show!

Check out Shaddox’s track “Let You Go”:

Midnight Strange at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

ceb1d1f2-476e-4a1e-b2a1-911207c33229.jpg

When the strange play the bar things get… more than strange. You never know what this indie country outfit will do when they hit the stage! But they always bring a hollerin’, dancin’ party, so you best make your way on over to the bar with no name. It’s gonna be a grand ‘ol time, yah hear?

Listen to The Midnight Strange’s live performance of “Ed Sentcha”:

Punch Drunk Munkey Funk with Boulder Sound Lab at The Lazy Dog in Boulder 10PM-Close

Punch Drunk Munkey Funk.

Punch Drunk Munkey Funk.

Fort Collin’s PDMF are making their way to the B for a super funky set tonight with Boulder’s “transcendental brain massage therapy” five-piece, BSL. There will be jazz, there will be funk, there will be disco, there will be mambo, and there will be a party. That’s a guarantee. So head over and check out this crazy time!

Listen to Punch Drunk Munkey Funk’s “Montuna”:

Tomorrow (Saturday 04/23):

The Farmer Sisters at Jamestown Mercantile Co. Cafe in Jamestown 7PM-Close

The Farmer Sisters.

The Farmer Sisters.

If The Beach Boys taught us anything, it’s that siblings can harmonize like no one else. And Jamestown’s got some of those sweet harmonies happening tomorrow night thanks to The Farmer Sisters. With their voices, an acoustic guitar, and their playful stage presence, the duo will have you hushed and captivated in no time. And c’mon the Merc is the best, so make your way up the mountain tomorrow!

Watch The Farmer Sisters live performance of “No Apologies” for Front Range Explorer:

Cycles with Terrapin Flyer featuring Melvin Seals at Quixote’s True Blue in Denver 9PM-Close

Cycles.

Cycles.


Terrapin Flyer, one of the country’s most prominent Grateful Dead tribute bands, is taking the stage at Quixote’s tonight. The group has actually had several GD/Jerry Garcia Band members as part of their collective at various times, and tonight Melvin Seals is one such player. He’ll be joining the jammin’ band for a night of psychedelic transportation. And speaking of psychedelic, Denver’s psych/rock trio Cycles will be sharing the room on the side stage. It’s going to be an awesome mashup of sounds tomorrow night, so make your way to the True Blue.

Watch Cycles debut music video for their song “Soulf*ckah”:


Both Nights (04/22 & 04/23):

FoCoMX: Fort Collins Music Experiment Festival in Fort Collins


The annual FoCoMX fest is this weekend, and showcases talent mostly from Fort Collins, with a few other Colorado bands sprinkled in. With shows packed into more than 25 venues over the course of two days, there will be something for just about everyone! You can view the full lineup here and get your wristbands at this link. Maybe if you’re lucky, Slowcaves will let you crash on their couch after their set...

BCFM

Boulder County Farmers Market is every Saturday from 10AM-2PM. We’re working closely with BCFM to promote the music at the market, and this week, acoustic act Left Hand Market Boys will be playing near your favorite vegetables. Stop by to hear their strings and songs and grab some local treats from one of the many delicious vendors near the band!

GREEN LIGHT RADIO

This week, our Sunday partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions will feature a track by Boulder’s Billy Shaddox. The talented singer/songwriter just sat down for an interview at David’s Desk, so we’ll be dropping that for you soon. Hopefully you’re planning to catch his show at Vindication this weekend (see above)! Make sure to tune in to any of the Colorado Community Network Radio Stations here (95.3 or 95.5 Boulder) or stream Green Light Sunday night between 9-10PM to catch Shaddox’s track “I Melt, I Howl”.

See you in the sun!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured.

Sharing The Merry Madness of the Moment: The Alcapones

By: Will Baumgartner

There are three things I can pretty much guarantee if you go to an Alcapones show:

  1. You’ll leave feeling shaken up, stirred, and poured into a very pretty vessel.
  2. You’ll have trouble finding enough wild words to describe what you’ve just experienced.
  3. You’ll probably dance all the way home. I mean, unless you’re, like, DEAD! But even then, by the time the show is over, you’ll probably have been brought mysteriously and miraculously back to life.
The Alcapones.

The Alcapones.

This Boulder-based band hits the stage like a traveling minstrel show, determined to breathe as much life and fun into (insert your town name here) as they possibly can, and they do just that with their driving rhythms, delirious horn harmonies, and pointedly silly/ridiculous/wise singalong songs. The group is relentless in their determination to have as much fun as they possibly can, and to make sure their audience feels as much a part of the madcap show as the band itself. During their recent party/performance at the Boulder Theater, I don’t think I heard a single, stale exhortation to “get up and dance”, a phrase you so often hear from other bands. Why? They didn’t need to try to make the audience dance, it just happened.

A huge aspect of this instant dance-party atmosphere (and one that every band who aspires to create a similar feel with their show could learn from) is the Alcapones’ instinctive understanding that if you want your crowd to cut loose and be spontaneous, you’ve got to embody that same spirit onstage. This is a quality The Alcapones have in spades: a huge percentage of what’s going on up there when they play was not scripted or rehearsed. It’s the overwhelming, joyous madness of the moment taking them over. So if you go to one of their shows and find yourself inexplicably unable to loosen up and go a little crazy, perhaps you should have your vital signs checked. And if you find that you are in fact clinically dead, don’t worry: The Alcapones probably have a cure for that too.

Now let’s move on to our interview (in which the group repeatedly made me laugh hard): like all the best interview subjects, these brilliant maniacs have a way of eclipsing my rather simple questions with the overflowing poetry of their answers.

I saw one of your shows recently and was swept up in the powerful, dance-friendly music, and the overwhelming spirit of fun you create onstage. Although your Facebook page and website describe you as being primarily ska and reggae, I heard many other influences as well. What artists have influenced the Alcapones most directly?

Early Jamaican music from the 1960s influences our music most heavily. Artists like The Skatalites, Toots and the Maytals, Lynn Taitt, The Pioneers, The Ethiopians, Prince Buster, Lee Scratch Perry, Laurel Aitken, and The Specials have had a very direct impact on our sound. Naturally, as a ska/reggae band, we have some tributes to Bob Marley thrown in; however, our sound is more 'early Bob' in that we focus on a faster, more upbeat ska-feel, rather than a slower reggae sound that's more typical of 70s and 80s Jamaican music.  Our “other” influences would include Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Parliament Funkadelic, Fela Kuti, Taraf De Haidouks, Dusty Fingers, and a smorgasbord of international/world/middle eastern Yiddish and Klezmer music.  

You had a few guest musicians onstage with you at the show I saw. Do you use guest/sit-in players often? What are the most people you've ever had onstage at once? 

Our core group is six or seven members (when Johannes is in town), but we are lucky enough to feature a heavy hitter from time to time. Occasionally some renegade jazz cats show up unannounced. We’re methodized misfits and we attract other methodized misfits, who also miraculously play horns.  

What's the history of this band? When and how did the group start, and what changes have occurred since that formation?

Several members started a reggae dub project called Weapons of Mass Creation back in 2011. That group fell apart in 2012 but some of the members wanted to keep playing together, and to make the sound more of a ska feel. And so begins our story:

Sam (on accordion) and Shaun (on sax) met and jammed out to some Joe Gibbs and Lee Perry, realizing that they had a mutual love for the music. They began playing on Pearl St. as a two-piece.

Eventually, Sam introduced Shaun to Clay and Johannes, and Clay happened to know a metal drummer (Jake). Prior to The Alcapones, Jake had never played one drop rhythm, but his youth and aggressive backbone beats have become part of our signature sound.  

In 2014, the Swedish international superstar, Johannes (trombone) moved with his wife to Chile. But he still frequents a couple of shows a year dressed in a red onesie; he always brings some punk rocker poetry and plays a mean shaker.

Tom, the replacement trombonist, was sourced from Wyoming’s Craigslist. He was looking to make a buck doing some church gigs, and later confessed that he was actually armed when he came to the first rehearsal, as he didn’t know what we were all about.

Finally, hot off the boat from Hawaii, Jayma (clarinet) took a quick job as a ski instructor up at Eldora, where her fateful path would cross with the band on a night when The Alcapones played at a party. She had just come from a jazz jam at an old folks home when she hopped up on stage, unannounced, and ripped a few solos while metaphorically punching us upside the head with her circus antics. Needless to say, she fit right in, and she’s been in the band ever since.  

While watching the group onstage, I kept thinking of Gogol Bordello. I know your core sound comes mostly from Jamaica, but I wonder: are y'all familiar with this group and has their Eastern European gypsy-carnival style influenced The Alcapones at all? 

To even be remotely compared to Gogol Bordello is an honor. We have been tinkering with the Klezmer sound and studying some of the scales and the basic Hebrew idiom that make up their music. For us, that sound is especially enhanced when Shaun is on accordion. The clarinet also adds to this flavor. Our partycore modus meshes naturally with the street party style that Gogol bring to their shows. It’s spontaneous combustion. It’s in our blood, and so we cough up whatever comes up from the infinite spastic envelope of a liberating process.

We also find a lot in common with the upbeat bluegrass styles that are popular in the CO mountains, and play shows with bands like Caribou Mountain Collective frequently. That's why we sometimes call our music island-grass or mountain ska, to distinguish ourselves a little more. A lot of people think of ska as being third-wave ska like Voodoo Glow Skulls, Mighty Mighty Bosstones, or Reel Big Fish, but we're much more first-wave oriented. It's all part of the ska revival and the street party ethic making music for the common people, and it can be found in a lot of genres of music.

Horns on horns.

Horns on horns.

Does (lead vocalist/guitarist) Shaun Garin write most or all of your material, or is songwriting a collaborative effort?

It's a split between Shaun 62% and Sam 28%, with the others supplying the anamorphic 10% injection of whatever gets invented and connected. It’s like a bin of socks: lots of matches with a few strays.  Sam has written a lot of the horn lines and thematic impressions for our original songs, drawing heavily from the Jamaican influences we mentioned. Shaun has written full songs, but also helps meld the horn lines into more natural progressions, and he writes most of the lyrics. The other members add their opinions musically and it kind of melds together organically. It's a joint effort that takes a lot of jamming and practice to figure out what sounds the best. We’re an amazingly egalitarian group.

One of the things I'm most impressed by are your horns, so I feel compelled to ask: Who writes your horn arrangements? 

Sam usually writes the melody, or composes it after humming ideas into his phone, and Jayma and Tom add in amazing harmonies. The horn lines are constantly evolving, and each show can be dramatically different when premeditated execution gives rise to monotony. It’s a kind of Ouija board method combined with an extemporaneous Mandelbrot series. A recent fan described it best when he said "gushing horn-lines." We want to make ourselves cry while we pull your heart-strings; to balance that in-your-face funky aggression with the sweetness that could make Saint Cecilia weep.  

Listen to The Alcapones album Happy

What can an audience expect from an Alcapones show, and what do you hope they'll take away from it when they go home?

Rawness. Sincerity. The REAL. Whether it’s a spontaneous circus show that erupts or an introspective interpretation of a disquieted dark star, you better believe it’s going to evolve directly out of the present moment. Drop off stress and drama, insert happy and dance your face off. It's the medicine for a dark night of the soul experience. We want you to snap through! Self-express that badass self you are! And share your own unique thang, whatever that may be! We had a gal doing push ups last night front and center and we were cracking up on stage. Do whatever you want! Sit in a pimp daddy chair and simply go “yeh” and enjoy the vibe. We’re sharing and hope you share too! We want kids springing on the dance floor whirling around like a dervish… we want grandpa with his walker boogying down… (all of which has happened!). More so, we want to be that therapy for a good and grateful life.

So what’s next for The Alcapones?

Recording our second album with a desire to continue to grow in gladness by playing shows for our people. Lady Gaga say’s she’ll be the first to play a show in space. We say we’ll be the first to do some extreme banding in a hot air balloon with bungee jumping.

The Alcapones will perform at the Dark Horse this Saturday (04/23), and at the St. Julien in May (05/06). For more news, photos, videos and fun, visit them on their website or Facebook.

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Amy Kress Takes On Her Technicolored Monsters in "My Fears And I"

By: Jura Daubenspeck

We like Amy Kress' kind of monsters. 

BLDGBLKS artist Amy Kress in her new music video for "My Fears And I".

BLDGBLKS artist Amy Kress in her new music video for "My Fears And I".

Amy Kress takes no issue with giving it to you straight. And what I continue to be most impressed with is her ability to not exhibit herself as an individual who is unafraid or fearless, but rather, an individual who is strong enough to share her fears and channel them into her music. Because when it comes to cancer, divorce, and the, at times, petrifying role of being a mother, the fear is like the whispering monster under your bed: you can ignore it, temporarily even forget about it, but in the quietest moments, the whispers become deafening.

Amy’s newest music video for her song “My Fears And I” is simple in that there is no supplementary plotline with a cast of characters, no choreographed dance numbers, and no panoramic, aerial or fisheye lens scenery shots. It’s just Amy, virtually bare, staring straight into the camera and pouring herself out. Various technicolor light projections overlie her face, adding an awesome cosmic effect to the starkingly honest words she sings:

In the morning, between sleep and wake, I find peace. I am free.

And my heart bumps and my pulse jumps and the thoughts roll through my mind.

My fears and I, no place to hide. Empty bottles piled high.”

Watch Amy’s new music video for “My Fears And I”:

She delves into the paralyzing fear that no type or amount of substance can numb, and while you may be able to ignore it at times, other days you know you are completely surrounded by the impending terror. And as usual, Amy’s ability to speak so introspectively alongside an upbeat electronic rhythm that moves you to dance makes her music more than just a catchy tune. Amy shared with us what the single means to her:

“‘My Fears And I’ is my song about being completely overwhelmed by the events in my life. Every morning, I would wake and unknowingly savor the silence and peace in my mind. Then the reality I faced- my cancer, my ending marriage, the welfare of my children- it all came crashing down on me until I felt I was unable to carry on. And then we set it to dance music.”

So there you have it. “My Fears And I” was recorded and filmed in Amy’s basement over the course of a few hours, using only a camera, video projector, fog machine, and a laptop. It was released last Friday and is just one song that will be featured on her upcoming album, to be released later this spring. So stay tuned for Amy’s new music and upcoming live performances, by connecting with her on her personal blog, website, and Facebook.

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 03/11, 03/12, & 03/13

By: Hannah Oreskovich

This weekend is jam-packed with awesome events! Check it out peeps:

Today (Friday 03/011):

Trout Steak Revival with Caribou Mountain Collective & Augustus at The Fox Theatre in Boulder 9PM-Close

12509513_10153316101344135_8585936327122558823_n.jpg

We’ve officially been talking about this show for weeks and it’s finally here! Come get down with us at The Fox tonight with one of Colorado’s favorite bluegrass bands, Trout Steak Revival! Nederland’s bluegrass quartet CMC will be sharing the stage, and Boulder’s rock trio Augustus will get the party started! We gave away free tickets to the show this week courtesy of The Fox, and some sweet Augustus merch from the boys themselves! So come boogie with us tonight. Tickets are only $14 and they’re right here.

Listen to Augustus’ EP Into Frames for a sweet show preview:

Asalott at The No Name Bar in Boulder 10PM-Close

12742136_1253529501327861_1664768161285454095_n.jpg

Awesome four-piece Asalott is breaking beats behind the big brown door tonight! We just launched a whole feature on the Boulder-based band by our contributor Will, which you can check out right here. Come dance with us at the show!

Check out Asalott’s live synth set at a previous No Name performance:

Tomorrow (Saturday 03/12)

Apes of the State, My Friends Worship Satan, The Opiate Poet, Dead Work, & Patrick the Pirate at The Forge in Boulder 630PM-Close


Pennsylvania’s punk folk seven-piece Apes of the State are making a stop in Boulder tomorrow night at one of our favorite DIY spots, The Forge. My Friends Worship Satan, a punk duo, will share the stage, along with The Opiate Poet, and “the most metal folk band that plays ska punk”, Dead Work. Plus, local favorite Patrick the Pirate will open the show. Come one, come all. It’s gonna be a great night.

Listen to Apes of State’s “Things I never meant to tell you”:

WadiRum at The Laughing Goat Coffeehouse in Boulder 8PM-Close

WadiRum’s name and sound are inspired by frontman Stewart Erlich’s travels in the Middle East. The music is “raw, powerful, silent and loud in turns, and ultimately healing… with lush harmonies, warm bass and cello, and drums that move from subtle to explosive.” Sounds sweet! Come give the group a listen over a coffee or some wine tomorrow night! We get the feeling it’s going to be something you just can’t hear anywhere else.

Learn more about WadiRum here

Realtalk at The Lazy Dog 10PM-Close

Realtalk.

Realtalk.

Fresh off their first Fox gig, Boulder’s Realtalk are headlining tonight’s show at The Lazy Dog. We love this Boulder-based funky rock group, and are super stoked for this set. Realtalk always brings the party, whether they’re playing Nelly covers or jamming out thoughtful originals like “Freddie”. So make sure to hit the LD tomorrow evening and par-tayyyy!

Watch Realtalk’s official music video for “Freddie”:

All Weekend (03/11-03/13)

Frozen Dead Guy Days in Nederland -Various Times & Locations-

It’s that time of year again: time to get weird up in Ned this weekend at Frozen Dead Guy Days! There are tons of events happening and, of course, music! Some of the bands on the schedule include Gangsterish, In The Whale, Strange Americans, Intuit, Na’an Stop, Cold River City, The Samples, Dragondeer, Powerlung Rangers, Gipsy Moon, Lady & The Gentleman, Gasoline Lollipops, and a whole lot more. Peep the full schedule here and make your way up to one of our favorite mountain towns! It’s gonna get wild.

Watch Dragondeer’s “Don’t That Feel Good” video by Jam In The Van:

And for our radio feature: 

PS: This week, our Sunday partnership with Green Light Radio and Streetside Productions will feature a track by Boulder’s Cold River City! The rockin’ funk and blues outfit are play Frozen Dead Guy Days this weekend (see above) and their new album Thank You. Sorry. Love You. is rumored to drop soon. Tune in Sunday night to any of the Colorado Community Network Radio Stations here (95.3 or 95.5 Boulder) or stream Green Light between 9-10PM to listen to their recently released single “Could It Be”!

See you out there Boulder bros and babes.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Boulder's Asalott: Exploring Musical Worlds

By: Will Baumgartner

Oh you trancey, huh?

Boulder-based group Asalott (pronounced Ocelot, like the wild cat) is led by the quietly unassuming local genius of the hammered dulcimer, Forrest Lotterhos. The hammered dulcimer, a rarely seen instrument capable of complex patterns of rhythm, melody, and harmony is what Lotterhos composes Asalott’s songs with. The group then takes these compositions and adds some electronics, various acoustic and electric drums, and an electric bass played in an unusual way. The resulting music is like a swirling, sometimes meditative, sometimes ecstatic rhythmic journey to strange and exotic worlds.

Asalott's Forrest Lotterhos behind the hammered dulcimer. 

Asalott's Forrest Lotterhos behind the hammered dulcimer. 

Asalott grew out of a collaboration in 2013 between Lotterhos and drummer Cody Hart (of Boulder funk-rock band Cold River City). Depending mostly on the venue in which they’re performing, their shows range from the quietly introspective to all-out explosions of polyrhythmic dance music. And while they perform in different configurations from duo to trio to quartet, they pack the biggest punch in their full quartet form. So if you’re more into the gentle dreamy feel, catching them as a duo or trio might be more your cup of green tea, but if you really love to dance, best to go to a show where they’ve got the full arsenal going. I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Lotterhos to find out more about Asalott, and their hypnotically irresistible sound.

Forrest- your Facebook page describes your music as "tribal breakbeat". Can you expand on what that term means to you?

Many people ask us what genre of music Asalott is, and that’s a difficult question to answer because of our unique instrumentation. Breakbeat is typically used to describe electronic, trance, or drum and bass music with heavy percussive influence. Three out of four of our instruments are percussion instruments and though we don’t utilize any electronic production, our sound takes on an electronic music feel and a tribal quality with danceable beats, and a trance-like quality with the hammered dulcimer riffs.

Matty Schelling on the beats. 

Matty Schelling on the beats. 

I've been a fan of your hammered dulcimer playing since you used to come into Burnt Toast, the legendary restaurant on the Hill that was home-away-from-home for so many artists, musicians and poets. At that time, you performed solo. How did this project come together as a band, and when? 

I’ve been performing [on the] hammered dulcimer both solo and in various bands in the Boulder and Denver areas since 2008. Burnt Toast was the beginning for me. In 2013 I reconnected with Cody Hart and we began busking on Pearl Street and playing shows as a duo with my hammered dulcimer and his cajon. It was an instant connection and success. We didn’t even have to practice; it came together on the spot. By taking my solo compositions and developing them with Cody’s drum rhythms, [our music] started to take on a new life.

Matty Schelling was a mutual friend and fellow percussionist who joined the group in early 2014, bringing in electronic drum pads and auxiliary percussion. About a month or so after Matty joined us, Joe Braun [came aboard] with his uniquely unhinged bass guitar. Together, the four of us have been playing shows in Boulder since the fall of 2014. We’re still in our early stages, refining our sound and our compositions, but with such eclectic instruments and improvisational roots, we always seem to put on a great show. 

I hear a lot of different styles within the Asalott sound, some of which I can't readily identify. What musical traditions and artists would you say have influenced you most? 

As individuals, we all have different and varying influences, but collectively, we have been influenced by electronic musicians and producers who integrate acoustic sounds and live instruments such as Emancipator, Bonobo, Shigeto, Govinda, and Beats Antique.

Personally, I was influenced at a young age from folk, bluegrass, and old-time music. In my teens I began to listen to a lot of progressive and indie rock bands like The Mars Volta, who utilized complex drum rhythms. In my twenties, I got into listening to and producing electronic and hip-hop music. My hammered dulcimer playing is, at its core, harmonically rich in folk and traditional Irish music and simultaneously rhythmically complex with ever-expanding patterns, taking on a progressive and trance-like persona. I also have to give a shout-out to legendary hammered dulcimer player Jamie Janover, who I saw perform with Zilla back in 2007 and then again at Burning Man in 2009 with Lynx. His integration of live hammered dulcimer with EDM production really inspired me to take my dulcimer playing to another level, and I began to write my own compositions and expand out into playing with different bands and exploring various genres. Needless to say, there is a convergence of many musical styles in Asalott.

Lotterhos, Hart, & Schelling. 

Lotterhos, Hart, & Schelling. 

You've got a great group of players in this project, including drummer Cody Hart of Cold River City and Matty Schelling of Whiskey Autumn. Can you tell me a little about each member, their instruments, and how they fit into the overall sound and feel of Asalott? 

I play the hammered dulcimer, and depending on the show, a Nord synthesizer. The dulcimer is the lead instrument in our band, and most of the compositions center around it. It has a harmonic resonance unlike any instrument, and as a percussion instrument, it sets up the rhythmic cadence for the songs. 

Cody Hart plays two different sized cajons, which are often heard in Flamenco and Afro-Peruvian music. Cody brings a fat bass downbeat and an abundance of rich tones that characterize [his instrument]. Cody closely follows and supports the complex rhythmic patterns of the dulcimer while upping the dance factor. 

Matty Schelling plays electronic drum pads and adds a little vocal flair into the mix. With different Nord percussion synthesizers, Matty is able to add infinite variations of drum sounds. Matty ups the danceability of Asalott with his hip-hop inspired rhythms. Without using computer based production, we are able to achieve a live electronic drum beat that further amps and supports the rhythmic patterns [of our sound].

Joe Braun plays a traveling electric bass that he has rigged to a desk. He he either strums it or uses a viola bow to produce droning, often orchestral sounds. He also provides non-lyrical chanting vocals, using his voice as an instrument in itself. Joe brings and amplifies the contemplative nature of the sound, playing bass lines and singing vocal riffs that hold and lift the dulcimer melodies to another level.

When you play a show, what do you hope the audience will do, feel, and take away from the performance? 

We play shows at a lot of different venues around Boulder. We cater to the space and audience, sometimes deciding to play acoustic duo shows at small venues and coffee shops. When we play larger venues, we bring the whole band and up the energy level. We love when people dance and move to the music. That’s definitely one of our goals [at our shows].

Regardless of the venue or the size of the audience, we all deeply feel that the music we create is heart-expansive at the core and mind-expansive in its complexity. People have told us at shows that our music captivated them in a profound way, sparked feelings of joy, and deepened their connection with themselves and the people around them. We really want people to have a great time: whether they dance, have a spiritual experience, or just chill and listen, we want them to take away an experience that resonates with them and that they remember.

What are your long term plans for Asalott, and what's happening next? 

We recently recorded and are about to release an album of acoustic duo music. It will be six compositions featuring Cody and myself. We also just submitted a video to NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest, which was named one of the top ten entries in Colorado.

We are planning to go back into the studio and track out songs with the whole band soon too. That will be a bigger project with more production involved. We want to play festivals this summer and some larger venues in the Boulder and Denver areas by the end of the year.

Tonight, you can catch us at our home-base, The No Name Bar at 10PM.

Details for the show tonight can be found here.

Watch Asalott’s Tiny Desk submission video:

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Flint Eastwood: Detroit's It Girl Who We Can't Wait to See Live

By: Dawn Raymond

Flint Eastwood won't let anyone or anything break her (except sick beats).

You have to take the punches life throws and transform them into something your mama would be proud of. That's exactly what Jax Anderson, aka Flint Eastwood, did with her six song EP released in November 2015. The song entitled "Find What You're Looking For" was inspired by her biggest fan's final words to Jax before her death. Those words were: "Don't let this break you". That biggest fan? Her mother. In homage to all final words, mothers and biggest fans everywhere, this track deserves some love.  

Flint Eastwood

Flint Eastwood

Listen to “Find What You’re Looking For”:

On a brighter note, the poppy "Glitches" is a catchy, rhythmic total keeper. Much of the rest of the new EP has an upbeat and danceable tempo to boot. Flint Eastwood is slated to swing through the Denver/Boulder region sometime this spring, so shine up your dancing shoes and stay tuned. For a show schedule and more information, check out her Facebook page.

Listen to “Glitches”:

-Dawn

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

A Band on the Move: The Metamorphosis of the Colorado Springs Duo Get Along

By: Jura Daubenspeck

Get Along are more than just musical soulmates. 

“You could call us soul mates- yeah, we’re soul mates. It was our destiny to be together, and we’re doing what we were called to do. We’re really happy that calling was music- and that we can do it together.”

BLDGBLKS   Duo Get Along.

BLDGBLKS Duo Get Along.

Nicholas and Cara Yañez’s story is one that has been told a number of ways, yet it remains special in its own way. The two met in high school in their hometown of Monument, CO. He was a senior, known for his musical swagger, and she was a freshman, whose disdain for shoes was only matched by her passion for Star Wars. They shared mutual friends and musical talent, and after Nicholas’ band split, he became set on creating a duo. Upon returning from a countrywide search for bandmates, it became clear the two were destined to work together. “I entranced him with my vocals,” says Cara.

And so it was written. What began as an effortless friendship soon blossomed into a romance, marriage, a newborn, and the eclectic indie/dance-punk that is Get Along.

Cara and Nicholas.

Cara and Nicholas.

Get Along has been a universal entity since 2012, but the two-piece is currently in the midst of a creative rebirth. They’ve held true to this, erasing much of their early work that was online. They’ve strayed away from their previous folk niche and have embarked on a new mission: to create music that is as real as it is awesome, and to stay to true to themselves.

Their recent energy shift has been the breeding ground for constant writing- they’re composing more shocking music, engraved with truths that may surprise you and will make you feel.

They recorded their songs, “Slip Up”, “YUKI”, and “Oh Wicked One” at The Spot Studios, and while they are heavily focused on the future of their music, these tracks do give you a taste of their soulful, punk, dance-‘til-you-drop vibe. Cara’s booming voice captivates you, while Nicholas’ inventive beats and unexpected progressions keep you craving more. “YUKI” is a song almost entirely sung in Japanese, the language that Cara has been learning for the last two and a half years. This, along with the synth beats and electrifying vocals, is just one example of how Get Along illustrates their unique flair.

Influenced by some of the greats like Freddie Mercury, Michael Jackson, and David Bowie, Get Along’s live shows are spiritual experiences: an exchange of energy between artists and audience. In past performances, they have donned costumes and war paint, while also painting the faces of their audience members, beckoning you into their imaginative world.

Get Along will return to The Spot Studios at the end of March to record four live sessions to be released in a video compilation. They have hopes of an upcoming 5-song EP and live performances that showcase their newest musical creations.

So get connected with Nicholas and Cara- engage, transform, go a little mad, and become part of their creative carnival. Get Along’s music is available on Bandcamp, Soundcloud, and their website, so give them a listen. You’ll be glad you did.

Listen to Get Along's three tracks below:

-Jura

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

It Goes Beyond: An Imaginary “Interview” and "Concert" Review with The Itchy-O Marching Band

By: Will Baumgartner

Denver's Itchy-O are one crazy awesome crew. 

PART ONE: THE “INTERVIEW”

I’m in my apartment waiting for The Itchy-O Marching Band to arrive for our interview. I don’t really know what to expect. I’ve heard a lot about them, seen a few photos, and heard their music. I know they can be kinda weird interview subjects because I heard them live on KGNU recently, and when the DJ asked them questions, she was answered by electronically distorted voices delivering cryptic messages which seemed to come from another dimension. What I don’t expect is… what happens.

First, drums. A whole LOT of drums. I hear them before I see them. In fact, I can’t see much at all at first, because my apartment goes dark. Then, BOOM! From somewhere outside the walls, somewhere in the hall, the pounding of drums- a whole lot of them: pounding polyrhythms coming for me. It’s a little spooky, maybe, this invasion of the unknown, but really, it’s a lot more exciting than any kind of scary. There’s something absolutely irresistible in this mystery.

The Itchy-O Marching Band. Photo Credit: Patrick Anderson

The Itchy-O Marching Band. Photo Credit: Patrick Anderson

Then, simultaneously, two things happen: electronics and lights. It’s still pretty dark in my apartment, but as my eyes begin to adjust, I see dark figures (they’re all dressed in black from head to toe, with face-covering masks, black suits, and, on some of them, giant black mariachi hats). I hear, from some other place or universe, sounds coming from what I can only describe as… I don’t know, “intergalactic radios”? All of these sounds, as disparate as they may seem if they were listened to separately or picked apart mentally, are actually working together to create something which is, undeniably, music.

And then there are the lights. Rings of tiny red lights glowing on the brims of the mariachi hats, and other, bigger lights shining from various corners of my apartment. The drumming becomes more insistent and even more polyrhythmic and… WHOA! Suddenly there are lights all over the dang place: pulsing strobes here, sweeping searchlights there, lights worn by the members of the band on their costumes, and, on one end of my apartment, a tower which emits a Tesla-like, crackling, twisting band of electricity. It is now when it becomes more and more clear to me that Itchy-O, while knowing that I had wanted to talk with them, have come to do anything but talk. No, what they want to do is… DANCE!

Sombreros.

Sombreros.

And their want travels to me just like that: This sudden, unavoidable demand and need to dance. I can’t resist it; who could? I’m dancing! How very delightful!! And better yet, I’m dancing with the band!!! They wear giant megaphone-like speakers on their backs, they play drums banded on their torsos which they carry around the room with them while they play various electronic setups also attached to their bodies like food vendors wandering the crowd at a baseball game (or something like that), One member even has a portable Theremin that he carries in front of him; another rides a freakin’ BIKE around my apartment with a computerized music-making setup on the front and a giant megaphone speaker on the back. Some of these lovable freaks are just dancers with no drums or electronic gear or speakers and, wait, look over there! Here comes a big shaggy, sparkly dog-dragon-like-creature, which puts my befuddled and bedazzled mind into some Chinese/Mexican carnival setting. And all the while, the music just keeps playing and swirling while the drums keep pounding and layering, and…

Well, you get the idea. (Or do you?)

Despite the volume of the music, and the fact that all of the Itchy-O members mouths are covered by their masks (all I can see are their eyes), I attempt to begin some semblance of an interview.

WB: This is quite an experience, and it makes me wonder where it all started. What can you tell me about the origins of Itchy-O?

I-O: ____________________

WB: Umm… Okay. Well can you give me some idea of your influences and inspirations?

I-O: _______________________________________ (accompanied by what looks like a smirk of the eyes).

WB: Well, sheesh. We’re not getting very far with this, are we?

I-O: (Gives me the grinning eyes) (Shoves me gently, playfully)

WB: Ah, why do I bother trying to talk to you?

I-O: (shrugs!)

WB: (slightly frustrated, while undeniably still amused; charmed even) Are you intentionally messing with me? Just to get on my nerves, or… or make me feel foolish??

I-O: (shakes head “No!” emphatically) (Grabs me and hugs me- hard!!!)

And so what do I do? Well, what can I do? I surrender, give up on my insistent and rather silly idea of an “interview”, and helpless to resist the pull of the music and Itchy-O’s exhortations to resume the dance, I resume the dance. And it’s wonderful, isn’t it? Oh yes. Yes it is.

*********

PART TWO: THE "CONCERT" REVIEW

The experience described above, while it obviously didn’t “really happen” to me (OR DID IT?), does (I hope) give you, Dear Reader, some idea of what an Itchy-O “concert” is like. At least, the one I went to recently at Denver’s own Home of the Weird (Oddball Haven? Misfits Paradise?), the 3 Kings Tavern. I’d been wanting to catch an Itchy-O’s “show” for awhile, and when it was all over, I was… how shall I put this? I was DELIRIOUSLY HAPPY that I’d gone.

Yes. That’s what I meant to say. Capitals intentional.

Drums. Photo Credit: Patrick Anderson

Drums. Photo Credit: Patrick Anderson

You probably noticed that I put the words “concert” and “show” in quotes. Why? Well, because it’s hard to know what earthly terminology can accurately encapsulate what I was so deliriously, happily engulfed in that night. Itchy-O’s aggregation of 20 to 30 musicians and dancers doesn’t so much “perform” for an “audience” as they do invite everyone who’s there with them to become part of something bigger- much bigger- than the sum of its parts. Itchy-O goes beyond “audience participation” to the point that it’s really difficult to tell who’s putting on the “show”. And that, I think, is the whole point. Itchy-O simply goes beyond. And they insist that we come with them.

Of all these drummers, electronics players and dancers, only four or five of them were onstage: the rest of the group wandered incessantly through the crowd, engaging us all in dancing, playful interaction, etc. A few times, Itchy People (my own term) would come up behind me and play with my pork pie hat, bobbing it around on my head or taking it off of my head and putting it on someone else- and I didn’t mind, not a bit! You can feel the love and the sense of delightful mischief in everything they do; it just makes the experience that much more fun.

3 Kings Crowd.

3 Kings Crowd.

The Itchy People had no qualms whatsoever about coming up and dancing with us. At one point, I was dancing really hard (with my wool pea coat still on), and felt cool air up inside of my coat. I opened my eyes (they’d been closed; I was so into it) and saw that one of the Itchy People was doing this, using some hairdryer-type thing to cool me off. Yikes. How cool is that?

So for heaven's sake, let’s get Itchy-O up here to B-Town SOON because really, until you’ve gone where they go (into another universe?), you truly don’t know what you’re missing. You’d swear you were in some kind of heaven- one way beyond your wildest imaginings. And if you have any dancing bones in your body, well.. Oh boy. You’ll definitely be dancing.

Watch a live Itchy-O performance:

-Will

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

The Weekend Six: Six Shows to See 12/4, 12/5, & 12/6

By: Hannah Oreskovich

You sure have kept us busy this week Boulder! There have been so many performances and music happenings- and now it’s time for the weekend! Here are our picks:

Today (Friday, 12/04)

Derek Weiman and The Farmer Sister at The Laughing Goat 8PM-Close

For the ladies: Derek Weiman.

For the ladies: Derek Weiman.

Sometimes you just wanna ease into your weekend. We get that. But don’t Netflix and chill all night frand! Get out and check out Boulder’s Derek Weiman at The Laughing Goat tonight instead! You can sit down, drink some coffee, and enjoy Weiman and The Farmer Sisters bringing you sounds on vocals, guitar, and piano. Did we mention Weiman allegedly played Red Rocks at 12 years old with Santana? Yeah- that allegedly happened. This show is officially the perfect start to your evening.

Envy Alo at The No Name Bar 10PM-Close

Are you one of those music nerds who has to know what’s up with the newest of the new? Then tonight’s for you kid. Envy Alo, a supergroup comprised of members of Boulder’s Booster and Tenth Mountain Division, have joined together to bring you funk! And tonight is their debut show. So be that cool guy or gal telling everyone about the new group you just heard. Head to The No Name tonight.

Asalott at Bohemian Biergarten 11PM-Close

It’s hard to say whether or not it will be Asalott or das boot putting you in a trance tonight, but one thing’s for sure: it’s gonna be a realllll good one. This Boulder-based trio will be breaking beats and hearts on stage while you bust a move on the Biergarten dance floor. They’ve got a sweet set planned, so pencil them into your Friday night holmes. See yah there.

Tomorrow (Saturday, 12/5)

The Midnight Strange at Taco Junky 8PM-Close

Allegedly some of the members of The Midnight Strange.

Allegedly some of the members of The Midnight Strange.

We told you to go to the first Midnight Strange show back on Halloweekend and there was a reason Boulder: we really dig these boys. The Midnight Strange (formerly The Almond Butters) are rumored to have a lot of awesome new music written under their new moniker and they’ll be playing a ton of it for you tomorrow night. You can have it all: tacos, margaritas, and Jean du le Monde yelling at you from his drum kit. It’s gonna be a good one. Stop by the Junky.

Cold River City with Lula Granji and Tenth Mountain Division at The Fox Theatre 830PM-Close

Yes please Cold River City.

Yes please Cold River City.

Boulder’s own Cold River City are headlining The Fox for their third time and it’s going to be amazing folks. CRC, “the lovechild of funky soul and dirty blues,” are pumped to be playing a show at home and we’re told their set is going to be one of “the heaviest and best to date.” Boulder trio Lula Granji will be blasting you with some psychedelic jam rock after Boulder bluegrass/rockin’ funk group Tenth Mountain Division opens the show. It’s going to be a serious party. And we might even be bringing you some press on the event. Stay tuned.

The Next Day (Sunday, 12/6)

Willy Porter and Dave Tamkin at Shine Gathering Place 7PM-Close

Willy Porter rockin' out.

Willy Porter rockin' out.

Did we mention we’re partnering with Homevibe Presents to bring you some seriously awesome shows over the next few months? Well it’s happening. And Sunday is the first of the series! Willy Porter, the Wisconsin-bred singer-songwriter who has been touring internationally for 25 years with legends like Paul Simon and Jethro Tull, is playing Shine Sunday night. And Boulder-based musician Dave Tamkin, who will be playing some Chicago-fueled acoustic rock for your eardrums, is opening the show. Want more details? Then read our interview with these two here.

STACKED. This weekend is STACKED Boulder. Get out there!

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.