Review: American Grizzly's "In The Distance" Is A Journey Of Letting Go & Letting Be

By: Sam Piscitelli

In the course of our lives, we find ourselves repeating the cycle of dating: letting someone in just to realize later on that they aren’t right for us or that we aren’t right for them. If we’re lucky the cycle can be halted, if not we can become restless while pining for a long, overdue break. Rather than focus on the journey what love has set itself up to be, we focus on the peaks and valleys it provides. American Grizzly’s new single “In The Distance” beautifully depicts the acknowledgement of this bittersweet hardship through the lenses of letting go and letting be.

49273036_1140783146095735_7534743255737434112_o.jpg

While a myriad of breakup songs are delivered as either searing letters of revenge or false betterment, “In The Distance” withdraws from the normalcy that is placed before it. Rather, it relishes in the luxury of time, the perspective it’s given and the ability to move forward knowing that, this one particular love is buried and in the past. It’s a strong shot of truth and accountability, followed by understanding and acceptance. American Grizzly’s execution is not only flawless and refreshing, but showcases that the band is willing to go the unseen route to pursue what their truth is rather than capitalizing on current music trends for fame or fortune.

American Grizzly is a shining example of the difference between creating music and curating it. They write for their music to be sustainable through the years, not to just be a flash in the pan. “In The Distance” is a testament to that, through emotional intellect and a heart on the sleeve approach we are introduced to a song that is well-crafted and forged with the utmost care and respect. If “In The Distance” is only the single released so far, then the forthcoming album will be a record to remember.

Keep up with American Grizzly here.

-Sam

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Our Favorite Four Performances From Pitchfork Music Festival 2018

Pitchfork Music Festival 2018 has come to a close and we are already having withdrawals. The lineup this year was a truly incredible mashup of great indie, rock, hip hop, and alternative music. They did a splendid job at snagging some top level performers, both established and up and coming. Despite some nasty weather throughout the weekend, the rain pretty much held off or remained light, allowing for the festival to remain relatively cool rather than the typical mid-July heat that typically swamps Chicago. If you have your ear to the ground in terms of music, then this was a weekend you surely did not want to miss.

Ravyn Lenae.

Ravyn Lenae.

Some of our favorite performances we caught were The War on Drugs, Ravyn Lenae, Saba, and Circuit Des Yeux. The War on Drugs’ sonically large sound carried off throughout the festival grounds really well. For such a large band, their execution was tight and refined.

Ravyn Lenae performed on the same stage the next day, and for a 19-year-old just beginning to pop off, she had the most captivating stage presence. The audience really loved her, which was  made most evident when a stagehand brought out a microphone stand wrapped in a pink feather boa and people roared in applause at how great she was before she was even on stage. Lenae played a mix of songs from her various EPs, commanding the audience’s attention and really dominating her set.

Saba, another young Chicago artist on the come up, bounced across the stage for his first Chicago show since the release of his latest album, CARE FOR ME. He had his whole Chicago crew behind him, and brought out a whole bunch of other Chicago artists for the last song of his set, “Westside Bound 3.” Of all the Chicago artists who played Pitchfork this year, Saba definitely encapsulated the love and community that is happening in the city right now.

Saba.

Saba.

Circuit Des Yeux also impressed us very much. Haley Fohr, the voice behind Circuit des Yeux, stood rather unassumingly still on stage. With some gentle lights and smoke behind her, her simple stage presence was surprisingly captivating. Her voice is deep, and her concentration on her music was so evident that it made the audience really care about listening to it.

In addition to all the great performances, Pitchfork also hosted a variety of local food, clothing, jewelry, poster art, and vinyl store vendors. It would have been easy to spend the entire day eating and shopping, as every vendor is excited to share their story of creation with you. This is a fest that provides ample opportunities to take breaks between sets, and offers up nice places to cool off and relax.

Overall, we couldn’t have enjoyed our time at Pitchfork in Chicago this year any more than we did. We can’t wait to keep up with all the artists who performed, and are already looking forward to next year!

Chicago Came Out For Their Own at Final Day of Pitchfork Music Festival.

DAY THREE

Day Three of Pitchfork Festival started off weary with a sheet of gray clouds in the sky and forecasts for thunderstorms. Attendees prevailed and the weather obeyed, remaining relatively cool and dry for the entire day! The sun blinked out at moments, most notably during D.R.A.M’s set when he thanked the audience just as the sun came out, and the day grew brighter as he and the crowd celebrated the rays. One of the few artists slated not from Chicago, despite being a frequent collaborator with Chicagoan artists, was D.R.A.M. He played new music that people were already singing along to (such as “Best Hugs”).

Ravyn Lenae.

Ravyn Lenae.

Sunday’s lineup was stacked with some of Chicago’s top artists, making a day for the books as they all ran between each others sets to support and rally the crowd. Evanston’s Kweku Collins delivered a fiery set, spitting rhymes energetically to the masses. He somehow managed to keep his breath for his long tangents of lyrics while flitting and dancing around all four corners of the stage. Ravyn Lenae then delivered my personal favorite set of the entire weekend. Crowds swooned as a stagehand brought out her pink feather boa microphone stand. She came out skipping in a silvery tassel outfit, performing a mix of songs from her latest EP Crush as well as her first EP, Moon Shoes, and Midnight Moonlight with The Internet’s Steve Lacy. At only 19-years-old, Lenae has an incredible stage presence and strong ability to command an audience.

Smino was up afterwards, hopping onstage carrying squeaky clean white sneakers while donning a bright orange safety vest with hair ties to match. He and his band grooved out energetically on stage; at one point his manager even broke out into some serious dance moves as the crowd egged him on. Noname was next up. She seemed a tad shy in the beginning, but once the crowd started rapping her lyrics with her, she couldn’t stop smiling to her music. Her background singers boosted her overall sound as it carried across the festival grounds, making the music that much more impactful.

The legend Chaka Khan then graced Pitchfork’s presence as someone on the mic introduced the ten time Grammy award winning artist. Her band and backup singers had the best energy onstage; each and every one of them could not wipe the smiles off their faces as they played some of her greatest hits.

Closing out Pitchfork 2018’s successful weekend was Lauryn Hill, performing her one and only album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, on her 20th anniversary tour. Slated to go on at 8:30PM, audience members grew nervous as the time ticked over since rumor has it she occasionally blows off performances. 9:40PM came around, and there she was. The energy was insane; the park was packed out to all of the edges with eager fans trying to catch a glimpse of her on stage and hear her historic vocals. She delivered her notable songs with a strong energy, and commanded her band onstage, making an effort to have her art come out exactly to her expected standard. I overheard in the crowd she had a two hour soundcheck.

Overall, Pitchfork powered through some unwelcome weather to host a truly incredible lineup of acts, from some powerhouse legends to ones that will be headlining festivals in only a few years to come. Pitchfork Music Festival provides a really great space for music enthusiasts of all kinds to mingle, relax, and celebrate in the uniting art form.

The Top 10 Must-See Artists at Chicago’s Pitchfork Music Festival 2018

Beyond the headliners, there are a number of awesome acts scheduled for this year’s Pitchfork Music Festival. Here are our must-sees:

Pitchfork.

Pitchfork.

Kweku Collins

Kweku Collins is from a suburb just north of Chicago, but has been lumped in with the rest of the Chicago artists on the scene. Collins’ music is a unique blend of self-produced beats over his own lyrics, which float somewhere between rapping and droned-out singing. He performed a wild set at Lollapalooza last year, and is sure to bring that same energy to the Pitchfork stage.

Ravyn Lenae

Pitchfork is notable for bringing a collective of artists together at this festival, but something they’re especially good at is tailoring the talent to represent not only the diversity of the industry, but also the Chicago acts who are hustling to the top. Ravyn Lenae is one of these special acts, along with Saba, Noname, Chicago transplant Smino, and northern suburban Kweku Collins. Ravyn Lenae recently released an EP with one of The Internet’s members, Steve Lacy, and went on tour as an opener for Sza, both have which have skyrocketed Lenae’s career this year. Lenae has migrated from a local Chicago favorite to a worldwide obsession. Still, she hones in on her city’s spirit and is sure to have a truly magical set.

Smino

Smino is a St. Louis native, but moved to Chicago to pursue his career as a rapper. He slept on studio floors while working non-stop and was eventually welcomed into Chicago’s tight knit music scene. Along with Ravyn Lenae, Smino was on tour with Sza, helping boost his tunes up the charts as well. His punchy lyrics and riffs of deliverance set him apart, so his set is sure to smash.

Syd

Syd is the breakout star hailing from two of Los Angeles’ most notable artist groups, The Internet and Odd Future. She worked with The Internet’s album Ego Death, which was nominated for a Grammy and has helped shape the sounds of many of LA’s influential artists. Since her debut album, Fin, Syd has been receiving nothing but accolades for her sultry blend of current hip-hop production with a voice that harks back to 90s R&B pop. Syd is a hallmark artist of our generation and an openly gay female who started off in two all-male rap groups and hustled her way into the world’s most competitive music scene.

Listen to our must-see artists on our Pitchfork playlist:

Saba

Saba is one of Chicago’s most special artists, and is the performer you should count yourself lucky to catch this year. At only 23 years young, Saba not only writes some of the most powerful lyrics you’ll listen to, he has also started a foundation and scholarship in the name of his recent friend John Walt. He’s an artist that not only puts on for his city, but he puts on for people. He dropped his second album prior to touring this year called CARE FOR ME, which is a migration from his previous sound but retains his incredible ability for raw storytelling (listen to “LIFE” for a reference on this ability).

Blood Orange

Dev Hynes, better known by his stage name Blood Orange, brought his ethereal sound to Pitchfork a few years ago and we’re more than excited to see his name on the lineup again. His 2016 album, Freetown Sound, combined a blend of sounds in and outside of music to create a textured landscape unlike any other. He claims he sat in Washington Square Park in New York City to write most of this record. It was there where he caught and recorded a lot of the extra sounds you hear throughout this album, such as a saxophone being played in the distance. The integration of these environmental sounds creates a mysterious, diary-like experience for the listener. You won’t want to miss catching these vibes in the late afternoon sun on Saturday.

Big Thief

Brooklyn indie rock band Big Thief are bringing their synth-tinged guitars and rock-influenced siren-like vocals to Pitchfork’s fest. Their songs are a nice mix of slow, dreamy tunes and more aggressive rock beats. This sonic mix has landed them on a tour with Conor Oberst (frontman of Bright Eyes, one of indie rock’s most legendary acts), as well as an NPR tiny desk concert.

Julie Byrne

Being compared to the likes of Joni Mitchell takes a special person, and Julie Byrne is evidently one of the rare ones. Leaving home at 18, she stumbled into music to quench her own happiness and has since established a name for herself. Living a wandering lifestyle prior to her recognition has molded her music into a soft and observant sound, which will sound beautiful outdoors at Pitchfork.

Joshua Abrams

Joshua Abrams will be bringing some much needed jazz to Pitchfork, a genre too often underrepresented especially at festivals. An early member of the group The Roots, Abrams has built up his career in Chicago’s strong jazz scene. His set will be a unique vibe on Friday, and will set the weekend off perfectly for any music enthusiast.

The War on Drugs

Indie rock veterans The War on Drugs recently won a 2017 Grammy for “Best Rock Album.” They tell fantastic stories in their lyrics while also making some thought-provoking statements, simultaneously rocking into immense guitar tangents that take listeners to another dimension, and Adam Granduciel’s voice has a hauntingly beautiful tone guaranteed to give a listener chills.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Your Ultimate Fest Guide to Pitchfork 2018: Pop-Ups, After-Parties, & Everything In Between

19787511_1746857978676923_4820295944623093316_o.jpg

Chicago’s annual summertime PItchfork Music Festival is set to occur the weekend of July 20th. The acts range in broad strokes, from headlining artists Fleet Foxes, who have reigned the indie rock scene since 2006, to Chicago’s most developing talent like Saba and Ravyn Lenae. In our next article, we’ll give you the rundown on some of the top acts we don’t think you should miss, but for now we’re going to focus on the extra fun that surrounds the 45+ performances.

Pitchfork is smaller in scope when compared to other festivals, but they do not fall short of extra activities to partake in. On the festival grounds will be local food and drink vendors, where you can probably spot one of the performing artists roaming about with their friends. Nearby, the CHIRP Record Fair will be hosting local record stores and independent dealers to bring you an immense vinyl-browsing experience. Attendees will have the ability to walk through the aisles and pick out records for purchase or to simply sit and listen to the rubber in the moment. The record fair will also host an artist signing table.

The Flatstock Poster Fair at Pitchfork will be showcasing and selling the printed works of poster artists from the around the country. Tucked in-between the record and poster fairs is the Renegade Craft Corner, a cool pop-up which will be displaying and selling the works of modern craft and design artists. Works range from jewelry to clothing to iPhone cases or kitchen accessories. You never know what unique gift you may find here! Also on the grounds is Book Fort, which is on the basketball court. Here, a curated lineup of readers will perform works by themselves and other authors.

The fun does not end outside of Pitchfork’s festival grounds. Circuit des Yeux will be playing prior to the festival July 19th at the Empty Bottle. And then there are the after-parties! Some late-night shows we suggest are Open Mike Eagle and Fess Grandiose at Lincoln Hall on Friday night, Kweku Collins and fellow label signee Ajani Jones at Schubas on Saturday night and Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith with Cool Maritime at Constellation. Here’s the full list of additional aftershows you can catch!  

Don’t forget to bring sunscreen and stay hydrated over the weekend. Our best advice for getting to the fest is to take the Metra line to avoid traffic, as it drops you off right in front of the gates. Tickets for Pitchfork are still available here!

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat. 

Pitchfork Festival 2018 Will Be a Highly Curated Weekend of Great Tunes You Can't Hear at Other Fests

34590900_2119359194760131_5670903006061658112_o.jpg

BolderBeat is excited to announce that we will be attending Pitchfork Music Festival this year! One of Chicago’s most prominent festivals, alongside Lollapalooza and Mamby on the Beach, Pitchfork will be on the west side of the city in Union Square the weekend of July 20th-22nd.

Pitchfork has been held in Chicago for the past 13 years, and is notable for bringing a wide scope of artists to its stages- from music industry legends to some of the most upcoming and talented acts yet, you never know who you might catch. One look at the roster of past artists, and you can get a drift for this fest’s ability to pinpoint talent. The headlining artists this year are new wave stars Tame Impala, indie rock/folk veterans Fleet Foxes, and R&B legend Ms. Lauryn Hill, who will be performing her 20th anniversary of The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.

Over 40 artists are set to play Pitchfork this year, and around 50,000 people will be attending throughout the weekend. The publication’s keen focus on music brings in a special festival crowd, one that is acutely focused on the music more so than other festivals. Being smaller in size lessens the craziness of the weekend as well, and makes Pitchfork a highly curated event. Additionally, the majority of the acts slated to perform are more known to those with their ears to the ground for up and coming acts. You’re not just going to hear what’s on that top Spotify playlist.

Pitchfork also hosts local vendors, a record and poster fair, a “book fort” with select readings and performances, as well as an entirely dedicate kid “zone.” Tickets are available for purchase here- you can attend one day for $75 or get the whole experience for $175- which is a serious bargain in comparison to other festivals.

We will be bringing you coverage all weekend long, providing your front row experience for one of Chicago’s biggest events of the summer. Stay tuned on our site and socials for any and all updates!

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: American Grizzly Release New Folk Rock Record Of Past, Present, & Future Sounds

By: Norman Hittle

American Grizzly, a Chicago-based folk rock unit, has released their new self-titled EP to a steadily growing fanbase.

To those of you familiar with The Lumineers, you’ll notice a good deal of homage paid by American Grizzly. But also in attendance are some mellow nods to Mumford & Sons and a slight helping of Neil Young. The band’s own take on their style is rock’n’roll influenced by all things past, present, and future: from tube-screaming noise-rock to the minimalist approach of rural American folk music.

27907610_914023022105083_874724724353473588_o.jpg

The EP starts out with the calm folk ballad “Ex-Lovers,” picking out a steady warm chorded windchime of rhythm into the equally calm, but more minimalistic “Ain’t Whupped Me Yet.” Track three, “When Love is Found,” comes in with a southern flair and more upbeat feel. The more straightforward “Rock n’ Roll Cigarettes” lives up to its name with a very muted 40s era feel, yet boasts being the edgiest track. Finally, the EP closes out with the innocent feeling “From a Window,” which comes as a return to classic folk with a solid influence of blues.

American Grizzly.

American Grizzly.

If you like what you hear, the band has a solid backlog of discography that you can peruse with leisure on their Bandcamp!

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Brian Wilson, Blood Orange, & Anderson Paak: Day Two at Pitchfork Music Festival Was a Success

By: Annie Kane

Day two at Pitchfork was quite a success.

Pitchfork Music Festival.

Pitchfork Music Festival.

The weather yesterday was something festival goers wish for every year, and in Chicago, those humidity-free 80 degree days are quite a rarity. With a crowd that seemed almost double in size compared to the day before, every stage was bumping and filled with trendy music listeners.

Blood Orange.

Blood Orange.

Blood Orange’s set was just as magical as I was hoping it would be: donning simple jogger pants and a headband, Devonte Hynes started things off by playing the audio track off of the first song from his recent album, Freetown Sound. The woman’s voice on the track echoed off the park, as she spoke in slam-poetry style about feminism and media representation in today's society. You could feel the audience’s emotion as cheers swelled up in the strong points of her speech. Hynes then sat down on his low-set piano, playing simple notes that hushed the enormous crowd gathered to see him perform. As he rose to grab a mic, two of Hynes’ fierce backup singers strutted across the stage to their mics and the saxophonist grabbed his instrument as they all, in perfect synchronization, began “Augustine”. Later on, Hynes brought out Carly Rae Jepsen for the tune, “All That”. Hynes’ unique style blends the culture of off-pop 90’s music with clear inspiration from David Bowie and Prince, tied into his own unique vision. Hynes seemed so relaxed on stage, as he twirled around singing dreamy notes and with the sun shining behind him, the atmosphere of the set was almost ethereal.

BJ The Chicago Kid.

BJ The Chicago Kid.

BJ The Chicago Kid surprised me with a heartfelt emotion reflected on his face during his performance, and his hardcore drumming skills between songs. His backup guitarist absolutely shredded a few solos of his own, and BJ covered a lot of songs, including tunes from other notable Chicago artists like Kanye West (“THat Part”) and Chance the Rapper (“No Problem”).

Brian Wilson.

Brian Wilson.

Brian Wilson started his set early, and as I ran up to catch the last spot in the photo pit, I found myself pausing for a second as the group sang “Wouldn’t It Be Nice”. The song sounded exactly like the Pet Sounds recording, making me question if The Beach Boys were all somehow back together on stage. Wilson remained behind his big grand piano for the length of the performance, staring at his sheet music and occasionally glancing into the jeering crowd. One fan at the front screamed out during a quiet pause, “This is my favorite album ever!” The band members all smiled, and for the whole set, they seemed happy to be performing some of the most beautiful music ever composed. Chicago natives John Cusack (who played Brian Wilson in the film “Love and Mercy”), along with his sister Joan, both came out for a song and sang at the front of the stage with one of the backup singers. Everyone seemed as if they were in a sweet stupor of nostalgia during Wilson’s set.

Anderson Paak.

Anderson Paak.

Since catching Anderson Paak & The Free Nationals at Red Rocks, I have had my eye set on snapping Paak again. I was buzzing with excitement as he ran onstage and went right into “Milk N’ Honey”. Standing between two speakers that were blasting bass so hard that my dress was being blown around, I couldn’t hear Paak’s voice well over the mic, but I was close enough to actually hear him from my spot near the stage. Being so close, I could feel the energy radiating off of Paak and his whole band. He brought so much more power to this performance, keeping energy high by going right into his almost trap-like song, “Drugs”, from the album Venice. He jumped over to the speaker next to me, singing down into my lens before stepping over my head. After the first three songs, security pushed press back, as I reluctantly left the pit. Despite being back in the crowd, the energy was still palpable as Paak got the audience to dance their faces off. It was fantastic.

Hands Up.

Hands Up.

I can say I’m glad to be here, and yesterday’s shows were incredible. Stay tuned for more Pitchfork coverage!

Check out more Pitchfork Festival photos here.

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Sunday's Show at Shine: An Interview with Willy Porter & Dave Tamkin

By: Hannah Oreskovich

We're running press at a Homevibe event, and you should come check it out. 

Hey Beaters. We’ve got a little more for you today than just the good ‘ol Weekend Six. We’re stoked to announce that we’ve partnered with Homevibe Presents for some of their upcoming shows, the first of which is THIS SUNDAY! Here are the deets:

Internationally touring rock musician Willy Porter is coming to town! And Boulder’s very own Dave Tamkin is opening up the evening show. The night will kick off at 7PM, tickets are $20 in advance ($25 at the door), and it’s all going down at Shine.

Willy Porter is going to turn things upside down on Sunday. 

Willy Porter is going to turn things upside down on Sunday. 

This week, we caught up with Willy and Dave to chat about Sunday’s show. Read on:

So guys- first things first- what are you most looking forward to about Sunday’s show?

Willy: Seeing old friends always puts a spark in the show for me. That energy will be there for sure.

Dave: I’ve been working on some new tunes and I’m anxious to try them out in front of an audience that also appreciates Willy’s music.

All smiles with Dave Tamkin.

All smiles with Dave Tamkin.

And you guys have played a show together before, correct?

Dave: I actually opened up for Willy ten or twelve years ago in Chicago. We shared the stage at Lincoln Park Fest. I was young and very star struck. I’d been spinning Dog Eared Dream for eight or nine years already. The excitement was different then- I was more interested in showing [Willy] how much he influenced my guitar playing, and wanted to ask him about his family, his chord structures, and how life worked as a full-time musician.

Fast forward ten years and here I am devoting my life to what I love doing. After a five year break, I’m just starting up again and Willy Porter is still going strong. He’s an inspiration to me as a fantastic player and singer, and as a professional musician that continues to tour and make great albums.

Wow! That’s awesome. Willy- he’s got a point. We know you’ve essentially been on the road touring since your first commercial release in 1990- so tell us- what has it been like traveling as a musician for 25 years?

Willy: The road ‘bug’ hit me as a kid when I traveled throughout the Midwest with my dad. He was racing an Alfa Romeo sports car in those days, and I loved the travel, setting up the car and being a part of the caravan of racing gypsies. I simply couldn’t wait to go out on the weekends. To this day music touring brings the same emotion; it’s a gift.

Very cool. So current projects! Willy- tell us about the creative process behind your latest release Human Kindness. What inspired it, how long did you spend recording it, and who did you work with in-studio?

Willy: I spent about three years off and on writing, producing and mixing Human Kindness. It was a blast to make. I brought in some of my best friends from the road to join my core band including Natalia Zukerman, Martin Barre, the Carpe Diem String Quartet, and guitarist Val McCallum. I just wanted to make a record that was a fun ride from beginning to end. It was produced to peel away like an onion on repeated listens.

Tamkin.

Tamkin.

It definitely has that feel. And Dave, talk to us about your most recent work.

Dave: My last EP Cedar came out at the beginning of 2014. Since then, I have 12 more songs that I’ve written with friends Chris Webb, Josh Queen, and Daphne Willis that I want to record. I’m leaving this Monday to drive out to Cedar Rapids, Iowa to record at Crown Studios with Tim King and Dick Prall. Tim and Dick made a really fantastic album this past year, and if I can capture any essence of that, I’ll have a nice EP of songs co-written by some of my closest friends.

Carmen and Willy. 

Carmen and Willy. 

Awesome- Willy what are your plans for next year?

Currently we’re focussing on my next release slated for 2016- a duo collaboration with fellow singer/songwriter Carmen Nickerson.

Nice. I’m getting the vibe here that working with friends is the key to awesome music-making. And there are sure to be a lot of friends at Sunday’s show. Dave- you’ve played Shine before- what do you most enjoy about playing shows there?

Dave: Shine is an interesting place to play music. I’ve been there for a standing-only show where everyone danced, and I have played to an audience that sat and listened for pins to drop. The audience is there for one reason and that is to take in the show. There is no bar in the back or noise off the street. It’s a perfect listening room where the audience always seems to be on the same page.

Indeed. So jump on that page with us Boulder! Get your tickets for the show here. And check out Homevibe’s FB for event updates here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Wilco at Red Rocks: 20 Years of Timeless Music

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Wilco's performance last night was amazing, and they just dropped new music today.

Zee rocks. 

Zee rocks. 

It’s hard to have a bad time at Red Rocks Amphitheatre. The sound is great, the view is impeccable, it’s fun to be outside (even when there are terrifying lightning storms), and the crowd is generally friendly and excited to be there. And the bands- the bands love it! Almost every artist comments on the scenery at some point in their performance- it’s just an incredible spot for a music venue. This week, I saw Wilco there. Their performance was amazing- The Marquee even called it "one of the most incendiary Colorado performances by the band in the last decade". Here’s how things went down:

Wilco are currently on their 20th Anniversary Tour and the age range in their crowd Tuesday really spoke to their ability as talented, classic artists. There were families, groups of college kids, and people who looked well into their 60s. That says a lot about an artist- to have continually put out music over such a long period of time, to have regularly gained new fans along the way, and to have developed lyrics and a sound that span generations. Wilco are timeless.

A full band shot. 

A full band shot. 

The musicianship of every member of Wilco is absolutely insane. To the left of the stage, there was an entire room of guitars; neck after neck of shiny, wooden sweetness. I don’t think anyone on stage played the same guitar twice. Jeff Tweedy is the obvious driving force and musical master, but John Stirrat was killer on bass, Glenn Kotche blasted beats (especially on his rockin’ solos in “Via Chicago”), Mikael Jorgensen tapped on piano, keyboard, and a melodica, Nels Cline was backbending on guitar like a madman and also strummed a slide, and Pat Sansone played basically everything on the stage (guitar, keyboard, drums, other percussion, organ, harpsichord, and banjo). Separately and together, they were stunning.

The band opened with “Handshake Drugs”, closed with “Misunderstood”, and played 28 other songs in between for a massive, rocking set. Wilco played all of their biggest hits, but they also dove into a few groovin’ deep cuts, including a couple of Mermaid Avenue tracks. Wilco then did a double encore. Their first time back on stage, they brought major energy. I thought things were over after Tweedy had the crowd yelling, “Maybe all I need is a shot in the arm!” with him, but Wilco came out yet again, this time with a small acoustic set-up on stage. Tweedy said, “Hey- we’re gonna save a little energy for the rest of the show” and the band jumped into “War on War”, an Uncle Tupelo track, two other licks, and finally ended with the aforementioned “Misunderstood.” Tweedy tipped his hat to us and the lights went out.

All Acoustic. 

All Acoustic. 

Wilco’s show will stand as one of the best I’ve seen between the rocks. Just like their sound, this performance was timeless.

Tomorrow, Wilco plays Pitchfork Festival in their home of Chicago. See the rest of their show schedule here.

Download Wilco's newest album Star Wars released today here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.