Sabroso Music Festival Had Eats, Lucha Libre, The Offspring, & the Best Gringo Bandito Hot Sauce in All the Land

By: Taylor Naiman

After its inaugural year in 2018, the one-day Sabroso Craft Taco, Beer, and Music Festival made a return to Fiddler’s Green Amphitheater last Sunday. Whether the crowd saw Nerf from 93.3 KTCL dressed as a taco or witnessed a record-holding competitive eater Takeru Kobayashi scarf down a bunch of tacos in one-minute, there was no shortage of enjoyment. Music, tacos, and craft beer: what is better than this trifecta? Well it did get even better than that. How? One word: luchadores. But more on that later.

Sabroso’s festival was a spicy taco lover’s delight. There were rows of taco trucks with plenty of food to salivate over and a wide range of flavors to choose from. Sponsored by Gringo Bandito, the brainchild of Dexter Holland, lead singer of The Offspring, there was hot sauce on every table in sight whether mild or extra hot. Holland has established a name for himself outside of the music industry and continues to expand his horizons. The Gringo Bandito Super Hot sauce was the perfect addition to my tacos and chips throughout the festival- it gave everything that nice kick I was looking for. As a devout hot sauce lover, it’s something I would put on my chicken, fries, eggs, and definitely on wings. Over the course of the day, some of my other favorite foodie noms included the shrimp taco from the Denver Taco Truck; the green chile chicken tacos, which the menu described as chicken braised in hatched green chile, smoked jalapeno crema, onions, cheese, and cilantro (call my tastebuds now); and the “Pig Sty” tater tots from the Colorado Pig Rig which were smothered in green chile, cheese, onions, cilantro, and jalapeno.

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As a part of the ticket price, festival-goers were able to go from booth to booth and partake in beer tasting from noon to 4PM too. Besides the definite local favorites (i.e. Ratio and Odell), brews that stood out included Rhapsody from Meridian Hive and the Pome Mel from the Colorado Cider Company. Being in the 70-degree weather, both of these hit the spot as refreshing and sweet. The Rhapsody was enriched with blackberry and honey notes and the Pome Mel boasted notes of “Colorado wildflower honey and granny smith apples, with hints of rosemary & lavender”. Though not your typical brews, these evened out the spiciness of the tacos with a perfect little sweetness.

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With food and drink out of the way, let’s get to the action! Los luchadores! Originating in Mexico and characterized by colorful, ornate masks, Lucha libre professional wrestling has its own particular vibe and flavor. It was a major highlight of the festival and there were people of all ages enjoying the comedy and the animation happening inside of that ring. Each of the luchadors had a character to play, and the audience had a favorite that they cheered on.

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At one point, an onlooker decided to step into the ring (hold my beer!), and the luchador slapped the wanderer’s glasses off of his face, thinking he was a part of the show. (Rather hilariously, he was not.) For the fourth and final match, we were treated to a very special guest, the famous luchador, Cesar Gonzalez, a.k.a. Ramses. For those of you who do not know who he is, watch Nacho Libre! This villainous star gained notoriety from Jack Black’s 2006 comedy and women in the audience were definitely shouting “Sexy Pants!” at him. A lucky few were even given the opportunity for a photo with Ramses in the ring. Following the matches, people were allowed to buy their own professional masks, with prices ranging from $20 to $60 each. Each mask was modeled after Lucha libre’s best wrestlers and yes, there was even a Nacho Libre mask. If all of this ruckus sounds like your kind of get down, make sure to catch a Lucha libre match at the Livestock Arena in Jefferson County (Ramses unfortunately not included).

Black Flag.

Black Flag.

Of course, Sabroso had to sprinkle in some good music somewhere too. With a stacked lineup including The Dendrites, Dwarves, Strung Out, Black Flag, The Vandals, Bad Religion, and The Offspring, there was no shortage of entertainment at the festival. Even though the beautiful weather was replaced with a downpour of rain and 40-degree weather by the end of the night, it was all worth it. During The Offspring’s set, many concert-goers had to mosh or jump around to keep warm. The cold was chilling to the bone but the ones who had stayed and braved it got to hear some of The Offspring’s best songs including “Self-Esteem,” “Gone Away,” You’re Gonna Go Far, Kid,” and “Pretty Fly (For A White Guy).” Here’s to hoping there will be many Sabroso Festivals to come!

-Taylor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.









Riot Fest & Rodeo: The Music Festival That Knows How to Keep It Real

By: Sierra Voss

The final day of Riot Fest had my feet beginning to ache in my boots, my skin reppin’ a not so healthy I-have-been-in-the-sun-for-over-24-hours kinda glow, and a thin layer of sweat forever coating my body. Riot Fest is not for the weak-hearted. On the last day, energy levels were high, perhaps even higher than Saturday’s. A quiet buzz filled the air in anticipation for the night's headliners: The Original Misfits and NAS.

Bleached.

Bleached.

Sunday’s overall lineup was actually epic. I started my day off with girl punk band, Bleached, and these ladies were true crushers. They rocked and ripped their set on the Hoffman Stage. Bassit Micayla Grace was a forever stream of headbanging and hair flips, while lead singer, Jennifer Francis Clavin, slowly crawled to the edge of the stage to get as close as she could to her audience. After Bleached, I popped over to the Rock Stage to catch 2 Chainz. Thirty  minutes into his set time, he still hadn’t taken the stage, so I bailed. I am not into artists that makes their audience wait. I don’t care who you are, it’s lame. Bad Religion took the Riot Stage in the late afternoon, just as the day was cooling off and the sun was starting to make its way down the sky. Fans gathered, singing along with every word of their classic set.

Bad Religion.

Bad Religion.

This year’s Riot Fest was a pretty crazy mix of rock and hip hop culture. The last four sets I caught were a perfect representation of the dynamic diversity of music and people that Riot Fest wrangled up for this year’s rodeo:

Tyler, the Creator.

Tyler, the Creator.

Tyler, the Creator, a big up and coming hip hop artist, had a very subtle rock vibe integrated into his craft. As I looked around at the audience glazin’ up at him, I saw a unique mixture of humans. Some repped NAS shirts while others sported studded and patched jean jacket vests, but all were singing and dancing along to his set.

Sleigh Bells.

Sleigh Bells.

The band Sleigh Bells, were similar to Tyler, representing a perfect mixture of vibes for this year's crowd. At it’s core, SB are a rock band, but they have subtle hip hop flares throughout their tunes. And I have a big ole girl crush on Sleigh Bells’ lead singer, Alexis Krauss. She is all the things and is definitely worth catching for a live show.

Rowdy at the Rodeo.

Rowdy at the Rodeo.

The night ended with two historic performances: The Original Misfits, reunited for the first time since 1983, rocked the Riot Stage, while NAS dropped dirty beats on the opposite side of the festival grounds at the Rock Stage.

Misfits Only.

Misfits Only.

Whoever created the lineup for the fest this year was pretty crafty. I truly was not expecting to be as into this festival as I ended up being. But there I stood, at the end of day three, as the dust settled into the festival grounds around me, loving all the bands that had taken the four stages throughout the weekend and having met some pretty incredible festi-goers. Riot Fest has an authentic vibe about it: no crazy light shows, no weird heady worlds or attractions, and no BS. It’s a festival with solid rock and hip hop artists in a pretty stripped down setting, filled with festival goers that are ready to rock. This was one rodeo I’m glad I didn’t miss.

See more Riot Fest photos on our Facebook.

-Sierra

All photos per the author for BolderBeat. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.