BADBADNOTGOOD Talk To Us About Who They Want To Work With Next

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Toronto’s BADBADNOTGOOD are best known for their interpretations and collaborations in the realm of modern hip-hop. The four piece post-hop and jazz improv group first came together in 2010 at Humber College’s jazz program over their love of MF Doom and Odd Future. Founding members Matthew A. Tavares (keys), Chester Hansen (bass), and Alexander Sowinksi (drums) actually released their “Odd Future Sessions Part 1” on YouTube after their jazz instructors were unimpressed with the project. Ironically, it grabbed the attention of Tyler, The Creator himself and went viral. Since then, Leland Whitney (saxophone) has joined the mix, and together the quartet have worked with Tyler, Earl Sweatshirt, Danny Brown, Ghostface Killah, Future Islands’ Sam Herring, Mick Jenkins, Kaytranada, and more. The band are currently touring on their fifth studio album, aptly titled 'IV,' which BBC Radio 6 Music called the #1 album of 2016. This weekend, BADBADNOTGOOD play Denver’s Gothic Friday (01/13), and will take Boulder’s Fox Theatre stage with Sur Ellz Saturday (01/14). Grab tickets while you can here, and in the meantime, check out our chat with this crazy talented crew:

You guys had quite the international tour recently. Any spots along the way you’re really hoping to get back to in 2017?

We went to a lot of new countries we’d never seen before last year- Japan, Israel, Taiwan, Brazil, Mexico- they would all be amazing to visit again but we have a great time everywhere!

BBC Radio 6 Music picked 'IV' as their album of the year for 2016. What was your initial reaction to hearing that?

Very, very surprised to be honest. There were so many incredible albums we loved on that list and we didn’t feel like ours was a serious contender! We’re extremely happy about the recognition IV has gained. We’re also eternally grateful to our friends in the UK like Gilles Peterson, and all the other DJs at the BBC and otherwise for all the support they’ve shown us over the years!

What were some of your favorite albums dropped in 2016?

Solange’s A Seat at the Table, Kaytranada’s 99.9%, Anderson.Paak’s Malibu, Frank Ocean’s Blonde, A Tribe Called Quest’s We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your Service, and Andy Shauf’s The Party, among many others!

BADBADNOTGOOD.

BADBADNOTGOOD.

Festival lineup announcements have begun. Anything you can hint at about your summer plans?

Sure! We’re going to be playing some incredible festivals across the world- Bonnaroo and Primavera to name a couple that have been announced. We’ll be around Europe, North America, and a few other trips are in the works. We’re also going to have a lot of time at home this year to record and get into some different projects! Peace and love for 2017.

Over the past couple of years, your collaborations with various hip-hop artists have been incredibly impressive. Who is next on your short list of peeps you’re hoping to work with?

We’d love to get a concise project together with Kaytranada. We’ve got so much work in the vault that has yet to come out, and he’s a great friend who’s a pleasure to work with. That’s probably top of the list right now. There are a bunch of other friends in Toronto who we’re stoked to record with too!

Give IV a listen:

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When are you headed back in the studio?

Pretty soon probably! No idea what we’re going to work on, or what it’s going to sound like though.

If you had to tell us in one word what it was like working with Ghostface Killah on an entire album ('Sour Soul'), what would it be?

Wow one word... Challenging but also rewarding and amazing!

Make sure to catch BBNG at their Colorado shows this weekend; keep up with BADBADNOTGOOD here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Opening Day at Vertex Music Festival

By: Sierra Voss

The first day at Vertex had cars lined up as festival-goers excitedly filled into the camping grounds. It was definitely a get-to-know-your-neighbor situation, as tents were lined up directly behind each personal car. It wasn’t long before the field rapidly became a tent city. Flags were raised, and pool floaties were blown up and mounted on top of cars. Humans started to play lawn games in any space left untouched, as we patiently waited for the first bands to take the stage.

Big Wild.

Big Wild.

Which brings me to the lay of the land. There are three main stages on the festival grounds, and when you first enter the Vertex gates, you stumble upon a pretty heady little world. There is a cottage simply filled with balloons, a shed were women offer to wash your clothes for you with washboards (random and weird), and a nap tent. It all feels somewhat reminiscent of Electric Forest.

Fruition.

Fruition.

When it comes to the music, the band Fruition took the first big main stage around 2PM. The vibe was pretty mellow during their set, and remained so until later in the night as festival-goers slowly trickled in and explored the grounds. Things really started to pick up when Anderson Paak took the Cottonwood Parlor main stage. He put on an awesomely energetic show, hopping down to dance on the monitors and bouncing all around the stage. Paak rocks a pretty sweet septum piercing and has a smile that will make yah weak in the knees. He ended his performance rippin’ it behind his drum set.  

You definitely have to remain flexible and open to different vibes at this festival. The musical lineup for the weekend is incredibly diverse, and jumps from hip hop to bluegrass to EDM, all within the span of a day. Right after Anderson Paak, the band Dawes took the stage. Dawes was a 100% different musical vibe than Paak, but they laid down an equally impressive set.

My personal favorite shows of the night were Alabama Shakes, Jai Wolf, and Gramatik. Each artist crushed it, but Alabama Shakes really slayed. Lead singer Brittany Howard ripped out some powerful notes that filled my entire body with soul. It was beyond epic watching her belt out tune after tune.

Alabama Shakes.

Alabama Shakes.

It was an impressive first day for the start of Vertex Music Festival. I am now sitting here bright and early on day two, watching festi-goers yoga it up. And yes I said watching, not participating. It’s gonna be another rad day of music. Round two let’s go…

-Sierra

All photos per the author for BolderBeat. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Five Arstists You Should See at Vertex Festival This Weekend

By: Annie Kane

Buena Vista’s inaugural music festival, Vertex, is bringing some huge acts to its majestic landscape.

Vertex Festival, presented by Madison House and AEG Live, is scheduled to bring a variety of big name artists from both blues rock (Alabama Shakes) to electronic (Odesza) genres to the recently rehabilitated ranch surrounded by 14ers in the mountain country of Buena Vista. But the killer lineup doesn’t end after the big names. Many of the smaller artists chosen that are placed on the third tier of the lineup still have huge musical credibility to their name, and most definitely should not be skipped over. Here are our top five must-see acts from that portion of the lineup:

Dawes

California-based rock band Dawes bring their approach to raw old-school touch to their sound. Their vintage feel is a result of recording their live sessions on an analog tape, and inspiration from one of the most classic bands of all time, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Their rich sound will echo beautifully Vertex’s grand venue.

Ryan Hemsworth

Ryan Hemsworth is an explorative DJ raised in Nova Scotia. Despite only releasing singles since his last album in 2014, Alone for the First Time, Hemsworth has been riding a wave of fame this year. With access to a computer, it is easy for most anyone to become a producer, but it is rare for someone to be able to truly create art from simple beats. Ryan Hemsworth has this talent. His sound mixes misplaced voices, sometimes even whispers, into deep, twinkly, and ecstatic beats to create something that is like Pop Rocks for your ears. His set will be filled with all sorts of good vibes.

Hiatus Kaiyote

Hiatus Kaiyote has dubbed their genre as “future soul”. One short listen, and you can tell that this self-identification is spot on. Nai Palm, the frontwoman of the band, has a full voice reminiscent of Amy Winehouse that when combined with drums, keyboards, and sci-fi space-like sounds creates something you’ve surely never heard before. They’ve collaborated with fellow Vertex artist, Anderson Paak, along with Q-Tip, and have opened for the revered Erykah Badu. Nai Palm tells the Wall Street Journal that their music isn’t “genre specific… If you have enough different influences, it becomes a hybrid of your own. The collective viewpoint defines us." Catch their box-breaking set on Sunday.

Big Wild

We caught up with Jackson Stell, the brains behind the name of Big Wild, while he toured through Denver earlier this summer. Read our interview with him here, and peep a recap video of his show at the Larimer Lounge here. Big Wild is a DJ worth seeing live. He does not sit behind a computer, press a spacebar and then continue to vibe out to his own music; rather, Stell switches between his laptop, drums, keyboards and even an acoustic drum set-up. East coast native and California transplant Stell mixes a variety of super fun sounds into his songs, along with remixing a variety of well known songs, such as “Show Me Love” by Hundred Waters feat. Chance the Rapper. Big Wild had everybody dancing at his show in Denver, and he’s guaranteed to make you move at Vertex too.

BadBadNotGood

Recent collaborator on Kaytranada’s latest album, BadBadNotGood has been making big waves in the hip-hop community despite being a jazz-focused ensemble. The group, consisting of Matthew Tavares (keyboards/synthesizer), Chester Hansen (bass) and Alexander Sowinski (drums), have already worked with Tyler, the Creator, Frank Ocean, Wu Tang’s Ghostface Killah and Mick Jenkins. Their shared love of jazz and hip-hop led them to reinterpret famous hip-hop songs, which has attracted the attention of big name artists. BadBadNotGood is one of those almost-underground voices that is driving an  innovative change in music. Check out their song with Future Islands’ Samuel T. Herring, “Time Moves Slow”.

See the whole lineup for Vertex Music Festival here.

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Brian Wilson, Blood Orange, & Anderson Paak: Day Two at Pitchfork Music Festival Was a Success

By: Annie Kane

Day two at Pitchfork was quite a success.

Pitchfork Music Festival.

Pitchfork Music Festival.

The weather yesterday was something festival goers wish for every year, and in Chicago, those humidity-free 80 degree days are quite a rarity. With a crowd that seemed almost double in size compared to the day before, every stage was bumping and filled with trendy music listeners.

Blood Orange.

Blood Orange.

Blood Orange’s set was just as magical as I was hoping it would be: donning simple jogger pants and a headband, Devonte Hynes started things off by playing the audio track off of the first song from his recent album, Freetown Sound. The woman’s voice on the track echoed off the park, as she spoke in slam-poetry style about feminism and media representation in today's society. You could feel the audience’s emotion as cheers swelled up in the strong points of her speech. Hynes then sat down on his low-set piano, playing simple notes that hushed the enormous crowd gathered to see him perform. As he rose to grab a mic, two of Hynes’ fierce backup singers strutted across the stage to their mics and the saxophonist grabbed his instrument as they all, in perfect synchronization, began “Augustine”. Later on, Hynes brought out Carly Rae Jepsen for the tune, “All That”. Hynes’ unique style blends the culture of off-pop 90’s music with clear inspiration from David Bowie and Prince, tied into his own unique vision. Hynes seemed so relaxed on stage, as he twirled around singing dreamy notes and with the sun shining behind him, the atmosphere of the set was almost ethereal.

BJ The Chicago Kid.

BJ The Chicago Kid.

BJ The Chicago Kid surprised me with a heartfelt emotion reflected on his face during his performance, and his hardcore drumming skills between songs. His backup guitarist absolutely shredded a few solos of his own, and BJ covered a lot of songs, including tunes from other notable Chicago artists like Kanye West (“THat Part”) and Chance the Rapper (“No Problem”).

Brian Wilson.

Brian Wilson.

Brian Wilson started his set early, and as I ran up to catch the last spot in the photo pit, I found myself pausing for a second as the group sang “Wouldn’t It Be Nice”. The song sounded exactly like the Pet Sounds recording, making me question if The Beach Boys were all somehow back together on stage. Wilson remained behind his big grand piano for the length of the performance, staring at his sheet music and occasionally glancing into the jeering crowd. One fan at the front screamed out during a quiet pause, “This is my favorite album ever!” The band members all smiled, and for the whole set, they seemed happy to be performing some of the most beautiful music ever composed. Chicago natives John Cusack (who played Brian Wilson in the film “Love and Mercy”), along with his sister Joan, both came out for a song and sang at the front of the stage with one of the backup singers. Everyone seemed as if they were in a sweet stupor of nostalgia during Wilson’s set.

Anderson Paak.

Anderson Paak.

Since catching Anderson Paak & The Free Nationals at Red Rocks, I have had my eye set on snapping Paak again. I was buzzing with excitement as he ran onstage and went right into “Milk N’ Honey”. Standing between two speakers that were blasting bass so hard that my dress was being blown around, I couldn’t hear Paak’s voice well over the mic, but I was close enough to actually hear him from my spot near the stage. Being so close, I could feel the energy radiating off of Paak and his whole band. He brought so much more power to this performance, keeping energy high by going right into his almost trap-like song, “Drugs”, from the album Venice. He jumped over to the speaker next to me, singing down into my lens before stepping over my head. After the first three songs, security pushed press back, as I reluctantly left the pit. Despite being back in the crowd, the energy was still palpable as Paak got the audience to dance their faces off. It was fantastic.

Hands Up.

Hands Up.

I can say I’m glad to be here, and yesterday’s shows were incredible. Stay tuned for more Pitchfork coverage!

Check out more Pitchfork Festival photos here.

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos per the author. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

"Yes Lawd!": Anderson Paak is on an Other-Worldly Level & He's Coming to Colorado's Vertex Festival

By: Annie Kane

With all the odds against him, Anderson Paak’s career has turned into something dreams are made of.

Anderson Paak at his recent Red Rocks performance.

Anderson Paak at his recent Red Rocks performance.

Despite changing his name from Lovejoy to Anderson Paak, the artist behind both monikers hasn’t moved away from his initial philosophy: turning a negative past into beautiful and inspiring music, and calling forth love and compassion from those who listen to it.

A lot of Paak’s inspiration behind his musical method was recently revealed in an interview with Pitchfork, where he discussed two painful memories: one of his father beating his mother, and the other of his father’s death after serving a 14+ year prison sentence. The trials and tribulations in Paak’s life don’t end there, but these hardships certainly serve as a point of reference for the size of the hurdles Paak has had to overcome. Paak’s mother, on the other hand, dedicated herself to raising him and taught him to transform his hardships. Paak speaks on this in his song “The Season | Carry Me” in which he calls out repeatedly, “Mama will you carry me?”

Paak on the kit.

Paak on the kit.

Paak has surely made it his goal not only to redefine himself, but also to create impactful music that can affect multiple genres. Listening to one of Paak’s albums will take you on a journey through the culture of music yesterday, today and tomorrow. His recognizably raspy and charismatic voice carries through over jazz, R&B, trap, funk and experimental rock. Paak recently told Noisey, “People have said I couldn’t do songs with all these different genres, with all these different artists. It made me wanna break the rules.” And break the rules he has.

Listen to Anderson Paak's album Malibu:

Paak’s latest album, Malibu, begins with a soulful R&B tune, “The Bird” and before you’re ready for it, he jumps right into a completely new vibe with “Heart Don’t Stand a Chance”. The jazzy, drum-driven introduction to this song is reminiscent of Kendrick Lamar’s 2015 album, To Pimp A Butterfly. Malibu continues to ebb and flow in various directions, teleporting listeners from 80s skate rinks in “Am I Wrong”, to futuristic clubs in “Parking Lot”, and finally to a dreamy jazz lounge in “Room In Here”. The entire album is laced with samples of old recordings of interviews, documentaries, and advertisements too, keeping your ear intrigued. This release proves that Paak has mastered his craft, and is bringing the 21st century music culture with him as he pushes creative boundaries.

Paak with The Free Nationals.

Paak with The Free Nationals.

Just last month, we caught Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals’ recent show at Red Rocks with Bryson Tiller, and can personally guarantee that he will give one of the liveliest performances you will ever see. Paak grooves on stage with a dance style just as unique as his music, and fearlessly jumps over his drum set to drive the beat of his songs while incredulously still singing and rapping. Anderson Paak is on an ethereal level that doesn’t come around often. Which is why we recommend you buy your tickets to Vertex Festival in Buena Vista, CO now! The festival is scheduled for the weekend of August 5th-7th, and Paak is at the top of our must-see list on the lineup. We’ll be covering the festival, so stay tuned, and in the meantime, get your tickets to Vertex here.

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos per the author; embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited.

Anderson Paak Made Us Dance at Red Rocks Last Night

By: Annie Kane

Since this year’s SXSW, Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals have taken the world by storm, spreading their inventive style that fuses jazz, R&B and hip-hop.

Anderson Paak.

Anderson Paak.

Hailing from California, Anderson Paak first started producing music from his bedroom as a teen and drummed at his family’s local church. Fast forward to 2014 and you can find him appearing on six songs from Dr. Dre’s album, Compton. The support from this music legend broke Paak into the music scene, leading him to collaborate with the likes of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, ASAP Ferg, Kaytranda, and more. Since his energetic performance at SXSW, the name Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals has been popping up everywhere, from Twitter to late night shows, to summer music festivals.

Paak in the crowd at Red Rocks.

Paak in the crowd at Red Rocks.

Last night, Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals joined forces with Bryson Tiller for a stunning show at Red Rocks. The artistry Paak demonstrated was incredible. Paak’s roots shined onstage as he navigated between grooving solo on the mic, to jumping behind his drum set and being one with the band. With a contagious smile plastered across his face the entire time, Paak showed off his finest dance moves in-between, effortlessly breathing his raspy lyrics into the mic. His stylistic ability to transform himself between a rapper, singer, and drummer proves not only his strong musical capabilities, but also the dedication he has toward his art.

Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals.

Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals.

Despite being the frontman, Anderson Paak held no dictatorship over the stage. The Free Nationals were as much a part of the performance as Paak was. Their sound was tight and they weren’t afraid to interact with each other to create a fun environment on stage. Each performer was able to spread their infectious energy, prompting fans to break out their own dance moves, which made for a musical celebration unlike any other.

Malibu Attitude.

Malibu Attitude.

With an ode to the late David Bowie in their brief rendition of the beginning of “Let’s Dance”, Paak and The Free Nationals brought their set to a close, with every fan still eagerly dancing on their feet.

Keep up with Anderson Paak and The Free Nationals here. And see them at Vertex Festival with us in August!

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos per the author; embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited.

Big Wild Is The Next Big Name In Electronic Music

By: Annie Kane

This summer, Big Wild will be one of the most talked about names in electronic music, and we got to talk to him about what that feels like.

Jackson Stell, the DJ, engineer, producer and composer behind the name Big Wild, is making waves by bringing an unconventional approach to his music. With hip-hop beats and instrumentals initially pushing him into the production side of music in high school, combined with the outdoorsy lifestyle Stell has recently adopted in California, Big Wild’s sound is very much a testament to its own name. Stell has toured recently with Odesza and GRiZ, and has currently sold out 13 of the 23 US shows on his spring tour. We got to catch up with this emerging young voice, and find out what has led him to where he is today and where he plans on going. Keep reading and check out the audio of the interview below!

What sort of music did you grow up listening to? I read in an interview that your dad played guitar on one of your songs, so I was wondering what sort of environment you were in.

It was very much kind of me just finding whatever music I was into. I was into a lot of random things, like movie soundtracks. When I was a little kid, I used to be really into surf music and I used to be really into funk music too; it was kind of just whatever kept me really interested. And then when I got into middle school and high school, I really got into hip-hop and that’s why I started to make instrumentals and stuff from there.

Big Wild. 

Big Wild. 

Why did you choose to go down the electronic path?

That kind of happened when I got into college. Electronic music was becoming more popular and it was like a whole genre of music. I started to really appreciate and enjoy a lot of the aspects of it, and I wanted to take my hip-hop background and make it a little more experimental and interesting, and basically just try a lot of new things. With electronic music becoming bigger, I kind of grew to like it more and I decided [that was] where I wanted to go with music.

Listen to Big Wild’s track Aftergold (feat. Tove Styrke):

When did you realize your passion for music could turn into a real career?

I knew I wanted to do music for a long time. After producing for a couple of years, I started to sell instrumentals to rappers. I was running a little business and DJing, and I was really enjoying it too. I realized that this is what I wanna do. I never knew for sure if I would actually be able to make a living off of it, but I knew I would try my best to make it happen.

You toured with Odesza- can you talk a little about that experience?

Yeah! Those guys were really helpful in kind of getting things going for me in terms of live shows, opportunities for songs, and releasing [music] through Foreign Family Collective. Touring with them was a really good experience. A lot of the ideas that I have now for my live shows kind of came from learning from those guys. They were super helpful and they’re definitely super good friends of mine now. We stay in touch and talk about music all the time.

So they helped you adjust to the touring life?

Yeah, definitely. [They helped] in terms of my show and also how to go about running a tour and making sure to have a good time and explore the places you’re going to and to, you know, make the the most of it.

Check out Big Wild’s CHVRCHES “Empty Threat” remix:

You talked a little earlier about your interest in hip-hop music. With Phife Dawg’s recent passing have you gone back to any of A Tribe Called Quest’s music as as far as inspiration?

A Tribe Called Quest was definitely one of my earlier hip-hop influences, and like love for hip-hop, but that kind of came later. [For me], it was local producers in the beginning who kind of influenced me. That being said, I was super into A Tribe Called Quest when I got into high school. I think [Phife Dawg] and A Tribe Called Quest’s contributions to hip-hop in general are really significant. I definitely did go back to A Tribe Called Quest and looked through their catalog [after Dawg’s passing] and that brought back a lot of memories from high school.

How do you find new music?

I explore random things on SoundCloud and see what people I’m following are liking or reposting. It’s kind of the way I find out about lesser or smaller known artists. I’ve been getting really into Spotify lately, too. I’ve always had an account, but I find [Spotify] is getting better at [allowing users to] discover new stuff. And also just word of mouth. I kind of have a really good group of friends whose musical opinion I really like. So if they recommend me any new music, I’ll check it out, and I try and reciprocate by showing them what I’m listening to. I find that actually is the most effective way to find music- through your friends whose music tastes you really vibe with.

Definitely. So who are you currently listening to?

Well I’ve been listening to them for a while, but I’ve been listening to Tame Impala and their new album Currents. But also, let’s see, I’ve been really into a lot of vocalists with interesting voices lately because I think that’s also where I’m trying to go with my production too. There’s a band called Reptar that I’m really into, a singer named Rationale in the UK, and I’ve just been listening to a lot more vocal music and figuring out how I’m going to incorporate that stuff into my own production.

So when you start making new music, how do you get over I guess the “writer’s block” so to speak when you get stuck?

That one’s tough. Sometimes I can actually get over a writer’s block if I just keep working every day on music and really just forcing myself to continue and keep pushing until I finally come up with something that really clicks with me, or I just hear something. But there [are] also times where I get out of a writer’s block just by hearing a new song or a new artist that’s made something that is totally different from whatever I’ve [recently] heard and I really like it, and then I’ll be like “Oh sh*t! Maybe that’s how I can combine, or maybe that’s how I can get over this hump, is if I use some of the ideas from this song or what that guy did with the vocals and the effects and stuff”. Just little inspirations like that really help. [Other times], it’s just taking a break for a week or two, and when you come back to it you feel really refreshed. If you keep trying to do the same thing over again, that’s when you start to get really stuck.

Are there any other artists or hobbies outside of music that influence you?

I grew up in a small town, and at the same time we’d always drive to go hiking and do a bunch of outdoor activities. When I was a kid, I wasn’t super into it, but at my age now, I reference those times just being outside. I think that really helps me, that really influences me to. I think it has really influenced my sound and the sounds I choose, too. I’ve just recently picked up surfing and I really, really suck at it, but I really enjoy it too. So it’s a good way to kind of take my mind out of the studio, and just go and relax and do something totally different. I also really like to cook, too.

Watch Big Wild's Spring Tour 2016 Video:

Are there any collaborations or projects that we can look forward to hearing from you in the future?

Yeah! There’s a new song I’ve been playing with a singer named iDA HAWK, who GRiZ actually did a couple of tracks with. I’m really stoked about how it’s coming out, and I’m kind of hoping for it to be the next single. I have a track with a singer named Nina that’s really cool too. I’m gonna be releasing stuff this summer and fall and a couple of more remixes as well that I’m really excited about.

Is there anybody that you’d to collaborate with in the future or any artists that you sort of have your eye set on?

Definitely that singer Rationale; I’ve been into his music for a super long time. Anderson Paak is definitely getting a lot more attention [now] which is very well deserved and I would love to make a track with that guy. He has such a cool sound.

He definitely does. I guess my last question would be, do you have any advice for those aspiring to make music?

Challenge yourself to make something different all the time and have your own, because that’s one of the most valuable things you can do in terms of learning how to produce, and learning to appreciate other styles, and to stick out from the crowd and have your own sound. If you make the same thing everybody else makes, it’s gonna be really tough for you. People wanna hear something that’s unique to you. You have to learn that. That’s the biggest advice I’d give to a producer.

Be sure to catch Big Wild in a city near you before he sells out!

Listen to my chat with Big Wild:

-Annie

Connect with me on twitter and instagram.

All photos per the author; embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited.