Television Generation's 'Peel' Is About Your Lonely Life As A Millenial

By: Norman Hittle

Denver’s own apathetic indie-rockers Television Generation are back on the scene with the same attitude and a new EP.

Check out Peel below:

The new music was released December 8th, 2017 through At Night Group. According to the band: “Peel is a 7-song excursion through the eyes of a Denverite's lonely millennial existence in an ever-gentrifying city.” Staying close to the same vein as their previous release (the four-song EP Fuchsia), TVG harnesses a raw energy brought to popularity by greats such as Nirvana (circa Bleach), The Strokes (circa Room on Fire), and indie greats Japandroids.

TVG.

TVG.

“Whatever” kicks off this release with a straightforward garage rock feel in a Dandy Warhols kind of way, highlighting the simple, yet, effective and easy to relate to lyrical content TVG presents to its listeners. “I’d Kill Myself But I Have to Go to Work Tomorrow” follows suit with an added level of dirty bass and a monologue-esque style of singing that reminded me of The Hives.

Katy Johnson.

Katy Johnson.

“The Model” holds coveted spot number three on the EP and presents the listener with what I interpreted as a sarcastic critique of the lifestyle of a fashion model, sung by bassist Katy Johnson. “My Favorite Drug” is a laid back punk vibe (if there is such a monster) alluding to a relationship being a favored drug. “Placeholder” comically comes in as an homage to its own name, but is noteworthy due to the song being uncharacteristic of the energy of the rest of the EP, and almost like an early Radiohead song in regard to its droning lethargy. “Going Blank Again” returns to a more traditional post-punk vibe, as well as being the longest track at over five minutes. “Thirteen” closes out the EP in emo-pop/punk style with a playful guitar lead while Will Hayden sings from the point of view of being a thirteen-year old.

Keep up with TVG on their social media and check out Television Generation live March 9th at Streets of London Pub. Event details here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

MOXIE Luxe Aims To Blur The Line Of Performer And Observer With Immersive Denver Parties

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Immersive parties are all the rage in other major entertainment markets, but the experience has only recently hit Denver thanks to the brand and event company MOXIE Luxe.

What does an immersive party by MOXIE Luxe look like?

We’re glad you asked:

After buying your tickets, which range from $75-$155 depending on the level of VIP service and bottle poppin’ you plan to do, you receive a mysterious email. Though it’s not announced where the party will take place yet, you will get a notification the day before the show from a MOXIE Luxe concierge telling you where to go. The location could be a warehouse, a nightclub, or even a water tower. Regardless, you’re instructed to dress to the nines.

You don't have to go to this level, but the performers will.

You don't have to go to this level, but the performers will.

It’s the day of the party now and you’ve Ubered your way to the red carpet where you check in. It’s there you’re greeted by models in elaborate costumes and a photo booth staged to look like a magazine cover with props and attractive people to pose with. You’re given a light that resembles a paper lantern on a stick and you’ll need it- the house lights have been dimmed and there are no table lights in the venue, keeping the element of secrecy alive.

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As you make your way to the main floor of the party, your lantern shines upon muscular male acrobats hanging in hoops from the ceiling, women in lingerie cascading around the dance floor on stilts, and various masked people feeding patrons cotton candy by hand.

Before you know it, a masked woman slithers up to you and hands you a card.

“Find the painter!” it beckons. And so you must.

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As you move about the venue, it’s now your job to ask various performers that you come across if they happen to be this painting character you’re questing for. Some will point to another masked individual and some will shake their heads. Eventually, you do find the painter, a man in a Phantom of the Opera mask who requests you actually paint with him on a sketch of a castle.

You can’t paint. But you throw some brush strokes down for fun (that Bob Ross Netflix binge was sooo worth it) and soon you’re approached by another character. This one wants to dance.

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As you’re twirled to the dance floor by the shirtless, masked man, you try to ask questions but he doesn’t speak. Is he part of the show? Are you supposed to quest somewhere else now? You no longer have your lantern in hand, but the dance floor is illuminated by the blue glow of the DJ booth. You move to the beat. 

Just go with it.

After a few songs, you're passed off to a slinking woman in an animal mask who carefully places some rhinestone appliques on your face and blows you a kiss.

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Backing up into the VIP area, you’re surrounded by models dressed in interactive clothing, like a dress made of cups that patrons can drink from. Beyond her, there is someone painting faces while body contortionists move into strange shapes and observers sip champagne. High above, aerialists dangle and coo. 

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This is really just the start of your night, as MOXIE Luxe events hold a number of surprises for guests every hour. Their entire focus is to blur the boundary between performer and observer, and of course, to show you a great time.

Says creator and founder Kara Dupree, “MOXIE Luxe was created to offer experiences where people can let go of the familiar and the ho-hum. Whether they want to be fully involved or just sit back and take it all in, this is an entirely new way to experience an event.”  

If this sounds like your kind of Saturday night jam, you’re in luck! MOXIE Luxe’s next immersive party is this weekend, January 20th, and the theme is The Dark Fairytale: An Akureyri Icelandic Experience. There are still a few tickets left, which you can snatch here.

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Still want a clearer picture as to what you might experience at one of MOXIE’s immersive events? Check out their recently released promo video for a taste below:

Keep up with MOXIE Luxe on Facebook.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Kayla Rae On Working With Other Female Artists & Women's Empowerment In Music

By: Annie Kane

It’s around 10AM in Denver’s holiday clad Union Station, and the place is already humming with travelers passing through and freelancers working diligently amongst the couches. As I sit down with local Denver singer Kayla Rae, we reminisce over what it must’ve been like to have traveled during the heyday of trains. She takes another sip of her green tea before we dive into our thought-provoking conversation on her artistry, the importance of self-love, and the empowering feeling of working with other confident women.

So let’s start with a bit about your background. You’re from Colorado Springs- how was that environment? How do you feel like that shaped you?

It’s kind of a small town, so I had a lot of good friends around me. I went to okay schools, but I liked Colorado Springs because it wasn’t too fast, you know? It was a little more laid back. It was the perfect place I feel like for my mom because there was five of us kids and just her, so a slower city was better ‘cause she didn’t have to keep such an eye on us. She was so busy all the time anyways, so there wasn’t a whole lot of trouble we could get into! But, you know Denver was always the place to come when you were a kid on the weekends or when you’re a teenager and you want to come party and stuff, it’s always like, ‘Let’s go up to Denver, there’s way more happening up there!’ I was a really good kid, I never really got into anything crazy. My sisters were kind of wild but I’ve always been ‘the good child.’ My mom always trusted me a lot, and I think that was because of the friends I had and there really wasn’t shit to do in Colorado Springs! It’s kind of boring. So, Denver’s a lot different.

Kayla Rae.

Kayla Rae.

So were your mom or your friends into music?

My mom used to sing when she was younger- a lot actually- she has a huge passion for singing. But she started smoking when she was really young so she obviously doesn’t have the best voice anymore. She always played really good music when I was growing up, like Sugar Hill, The Carpenters. So she was always really musical, but no one else in my family writes music or makes music, and no one on my dad’s side does either. My dad listened to a lot of jazz and so I was always around good music, but I think I’m the only creator in the family.

So you feel like you fell into creating music naturally?

Yeah, well I think when I was a kid I was writing first as a form of expression, like poetry, and stories, and journal entries, like I always just wrote stuff. So then eventually I turned them into songs because I loved to sing. You know, I feel like I was terrible at it as a kid but I loved to do it, so then when I got older it was kind of just what became of me. It was just who I was.

And then you went somewhere to learn how to produce?

Yeah! So when I graduated high school I actually applied for Berklee College of Music in Boston. I didn’t make it in the fall semester, but I got accepted in the spring, so I started in 2010. When you get there, they give you a Macbook and it comes with all different music programs like Logic, Reason, and Garageband. You take basic classes on music production and music theory, but I was just so excited to have my own software to do it ‘cause I was always in other people’s studios, so I was like, ‘I wanna learn how to make beats and record all my own songs!’ So I would do that- I would just make them. They gave us a little midi keyboard as well and you would just hook it up to your laptop and you could just create and record through your laptop speakers, so I would just make all these horrible sounding songs. But yeah, I was just learning how to produce, how to write and record myself, which I think is mostly why I do all my own recording now, because having that control is a lot better. Then you don’t have to wait on other people’s time.

Yeah, I was going to ask you about that. It’s definitely easy to link with other people now with social media, but do you feel like your music is more “you” because you have all that control and ability to actually do it yourself?

I think so. It is nice getting to work with other people sometimes because you have other ideas coming into the pot, but it’s also very liberating when you’re by yourself because you don’t have opinions of other people, like, ‘Oh, well maybe you shouldn’t do this,’ you know? So yeah, you don’t have to wait on anybody else. A lot of people are so busy nowadays with their own things that it takes awhile to get stuff back. And me, when I have ideas, I want them out right away. I’m the worst person at planning and making things go accordingly because when something is just buzzing in my head when it’s good I’m just like, ‘Okay, I need to get this out now.’ So it’s really convenient that I have a studio at home and I can do that on my own because I couldn’t imagine having all these song ideas and having to wait to book studio time to do them.

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Would you say you’re protective over who you let into your creative bubble?

Yeah, and it’s not even on purpose, it’s just, I need the right energy around me at this time because I don’t want anything to interrupt this creative process. You know? And I’m never too good to take anyone’s advice who would say, ‘Maybe this would sound good this way.’ So I’ll ask that of people that I trust- I’ll play music for them and ask what they think about it. But I think you have to be selective when you’re in any craft.

And your music is pretty personal.

Yeah, sometimes it gets… yeah. (laughs) It’s like therapy sometimes!

That’s good! So would you say you make music for yourself mostly?

Yeah! You know what’s crazy is that I was talking to another artist about this yesterday, I was actually working with YaSi yesterday. I invited her over and we finally got to work together, which is something we’ve wanted to do for awhile. But we were talking about that- about making music for ourselves, and that’s always how it starts. With any person who does any kind of creative expression, you do it because you need to. And I think once people start catching on to you and they start listening and you see people's reactions, you want to do it for them. You want to do it for their praise, but you have to remember that it’s not for anybody but you. And sometimes some songs don’t need to be heard. YaSi and I were talking about that yesterday too, just like that’s such a good point that you don’t always have to share things with people, and that’s how you keep it for yourself. Some people use music to heal, and that’s really what it is for me because, I mean I write everyday but I really do my best writing when I’m sad. I don’t know why that is! (laughs) And so some of that stuff people will never hear.

So when you perform live, what kind of environment do you try to cultivate?

It’s so crazy that you say that, ‘cause as artists we have the power to create an atmosphere. I just want people to feel comfortable- I want them to feel really in tune with themselves and with what I’m saying, and I feel like it’s like that when I perform. I feel like I’m respected up there which means so much, and I feel like I have people’s attention so I can pretty much say anything that I want. I feel really comfortable up there, and that’s how I want other people to feel- comfortable to kind of just get lost in the music for a second, almost like I’m in my bedroom. I close my eyes a lot when I sing, and I think it’s ‘cause I’m taken back there.

Is there anything you want your audience to take out of your music?

Inspiration to do what you want, you know. It’s so hard to get caught up in this world and what you think other people want from you, what they expect of you. I just want my music to represent me fully, and let people know that this is just who I am and it’s okay to be who you are too, it’s okay to do what you love. You know, you can make money off what you love, you can live happily doing it and it doesn’t have to be a struggle for you, you can do it and be free. And that’s what I want from people to get when they see me perform and listen to my music, like, ‘Wow, she’s just doing this for her.’

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That’s awesome. So what makes you feel the most empowered?

When I’m working with other women. I feel like naturally, we all just feel like we’re so different, we all feel like no one understands us and we’re just all alone in this world, or maybe that’s just me! (laughs) So when I get around other women, I just feel like ten times myself. I just feel like I can do anything. So I like to keep good solid women around me who also have goals, and they empower me. When I feel really confident in myself I’m empowered, when I feel sexy I’m empowered, and I get all that from [working with] other women. Which is crazy.

So how do you feel about breaking into the music industry as a woman?

I feel like it’s kind of hard because most of the workers in the music [industry] are men. You know, the producers and the engineers, and sometimes they get the wrong ideas when you just wanna work. Like, ‘Nah I just wanna get my shit done!’ But I do think this is a good time for women because I feel like there’s so many women doing so much right now. You have so many women in power: Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, even women on the come up like Tori Kelly, Kehlani, just all these great women in music. I feel like it’s probably going to be a little easier now, you just have to remember to be yourself and not try to be like anybody else.

Yeah, I feel like Sza cracked this huge gate of vulnerability.

Hell yeah, Sza’s amazing. Just so many women doing great things and it makes me so proud, because, I was actually talking to my girlfriend about this, and she was like, ‘You know, the women in this city are doing exactly what the women everywhere else are doing. And who knows what the women in other cities are doing and how they’re coming together and holding each other down and lifting each other up.’ It’s just, it’s a women’s world, I don’t care what anybody else says! (laughs)

What female artists do you most look up to?

All of them, oh my gosh. I really, really love Sade. I think she’s amazing and I used to listen to her a lot when I was younger. I took so much from Aaliyah when I was a kid, like I modeled everything after her it was crazy. And still to this day I watch all of her stuff and it just never gets old for me. I just love how she was so cool, just naturally cool. It seemed like she didn’t have to try, she seemed so sweet. Her music was kinda gangsta, but not really, she was sweet over her music so it was a nice balance and I really loved that about her. Now, I really look up to Rihanna, I think she’s amazing. As a woman in music, in fashion and in business. And she’s been doing this for so long. I really look up to Beyoncé, I love her so, so much. (pauses to think) There’s so many. I think Sza is incredible, I think she is such a good storyteller, you know what I mean? She’s not afraid to write about what she’s been through and it sounds like these crazy-ass stories that you get lost in but you’re also like, ‘Me too, I’ve kind of been through that!’

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Outside of the glory and fame of celebrity and things you can get caught up with, where do you really see your music going?

I just want to get a good amount of people who really like it all over the world who I can come to and perform it for. When I think about fame, and the people who have that, I just think about how unhappy they might be, like how much it must to be keep up with always being talked about or people always trying to find you and how that must really interrupt your peace of mind. I don’t want that, it just sounds painful. I just want people who really like my music and who are down to buy it and down to listen to it, and if I can make a living off of just traveling and performing and making music that’s really all I wanna do. The reality is we have to pay to live, and I think you just have to find something you like to do that helps you do that, that keeps you here, that keeps you fed, that keeps you clothed. If you’re good at something and you love to do it then make that the way that you live. I just wanna take care of my family with music and meet a lot of new people and go to a lot of different places. I don’t want all that extra shit! People kill themselves because they’re so caught up in the pressure and I think we live in that world now unfortunately where everyone is being looked at and there’s this pressure to be perfect and to have all your shit together, and it’s like no, nobody is like that in real life. It’s not even about all the attention, like sometimes it’s nice but if that’s all that you’re after, you’re just going to be so unhappy. I think about the things that make me happy, and it’s not that.

How do you stay so grounded? Have you always been this level-headed?

Well, one, my mom would slap the shit out of me if I ever came home trying to be bougie! But I just think, like, it is hard and sometimes I get caught up in it. I get caught up in what people think of me or what they’re gonna think of my next song. I think you just have to remind yourself, ‘Why do I do this? Why do I love this?’ I think it’s an internal thing and obviously the people you keep around you, too. No one in my life treats me as if I’m better than anybody else. None of us should treat anybody like that- we’re all equals. So I think it’s definitely keeping good people around you and loving yourself that is really important. If you don’t love yourself, you’re going to try to find all that from other people. So yeah, just really being comfortable with who you are. I feel like there’s so much to live up to. I don’t want my daughters or my nieces to feel like they have to be something unreal.

If you had a daughter, how would you try to guide her away from that pressure?

I would really just press self-love, because I feel like that’s really where it comes from, is inside. I notice that at times when I don’t feel good about myself, that’s when I try to do more with my appearance or I try to be extra on social media because I feel like I need people to tell me I’m doing okay. But that never fulfills me completely, you know. So I would really just teach her to love herself, and you’re different, and you’re unique, and that’s okay. You’re going to make decisions that people aren’t going to agree with, and that’s okay. I think in doing that you learn to appreciate who you are.

Keep up with Kayla Rae’s latest on her Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Soundcloud.

-Annie

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Anti-Flag Bring Together Local Artists & Organizations For Punk Against Trump at Denver's Summit Music Hall

By: Nathan Sheppard

Anti-Flag’s Silence=Violence Tour is making its stop in Denver January 20th at Summit Music Hall, and will feature ten bands for a Punk Against Trump event including Stray From The Path, The White Noise, Sharptooth, Line Brawl, Over Time, Cheap Perfume, Allout Helter, The New Narrative, and Rotten Reputation.

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Anti-Flag is known for being very outspoken on a number of political and human rights issues. For this show in particular, they are teaming up for a fundraiser for Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition. For each ticket sold, $2.00 will go to the coalition. Anti-Flag are also bringing along friends from peta2, A Voice For The Innocent, Love Hope Strength, and Amnesty International USA for the length of their entire tour.

Anti-Flag.

Anti-Flag.

Anti-Flag are currently traveling in support of American Fall, their tenth studio record released last November. American Fall is a hard hitting rebuke of many controversial events that occurred in 2017, with tracks like “American Attraction” and “Racists.” We are sure to get a good mixture of classic Anti-Flag and some of their newer sound at this Punk Against Trump show.

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Doors are at 3PM this Saturday, so be sure to arrive early and check out all of the opening bands and organizations who are sure to make this event feel like a festival-like sort of day. You can find tickets for the Punk Against Trump event here and find other dates for Anti-Flag’s tour at their website.

-Nathan

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Denver's Annabelle Raps About The Importance Of Self-Love

By: Taylor Naiman

Annabelle is The Mile High’s very own 20-year-old female rap artist, and she’s making big moves in the industry. After a brief stint in Los Angeles, she returned to her native Denver to hone her sound. Her introduction to the Denver scene was over a year ago at her first open mic and at the time, she felt like one of Denver’s only female artists. Still, she kept pursuing more stage opportunities at places like The Gothic and Cervantes’ Masterpiece, and while doing so, explored a range of sounds: hip-hop, jazz, rap, and soul.

Annabelle.

Annabelle.

Throughout the duration of her first EP, The Desire, Annabelle creates a storybook and gives the audience her true raw emotion. She has found a balance both lyrically and musically where she can explore different sounds and her own vulnerabilities. Her music is “melodic, soulful and highly vulnerable with hip-hop and jazz undertones.” It is open, emotional, and conveys her vulnerabilities. She strives to give her audience a spiritual awakening.

Photo Credit: Bobby Vasquez

Photo Credit: Bobby Vasquez

Annabelle told me that she is most influenced by artists she herself can dance to, such as Ashanti, Missy Elliott, 2Pac, Bone Thugs N’ Harmony and J. Cole. Lyrically, she likes J. Cole, Chance the Rapper, and Kendrick Lamar. She told me, “I think I hold the same potential as any one of those legends.” And maybe that confidence is just what she needs.

Photo Credit: Bobby Vasquez

Photo Credit: Bobby Vasquez

Currently, Annabelle is working on three EPs in the studio, composed with a new energy and varied tones. They are going to be all about her life journey and “how people can be dangerous.” Each will unmask more of her vulnerabilities pertaining to relationships, self-love, and her continued growth. She describes this music as being reminiscent of an ambient Odesza sound with a  jazzy feel and a hint of a “50 Cent club record.” When she is not in the studio, you can catch her either riding horses or modeling in front of the camera.

Well-attuned to her style and vibe, Annabelle is someone to keep an eye out for. I recently had the chance to ask her a few more questions about her music:

What was your favorite song to write and why?

Should I’ because of the whole story behind it. I walked in on my ex with another girl in his bed. I was pretty calm about the whole situation at the time and didn’t know how to feel about it right when it happened. I tried to write a song about the way I was feeling and it went a couple of different ways before I finished it. But I went from the honest, vulnerable side when I wrote ‘Should I.’ It’s the battle, where you ask yourself, ‘What should I do?’ For me, it is a very poetic song where I can prove my self-love.

What is one piece of advice you would give to another female in the music industry?

Always know your worth and do not settle for anything less. Do not be afraid to tell people, ‘no’ in this industry. Have the confidence to do so! If your ideas do not align with those of other individuals, do not settle.

Learn more about Annabelle and her music here.

-Taylor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Public Safety On Why There's Nowhere Else To Go In The Mile High But Up

By: Annie Kane

Four-piece Denver band Public Safety believe that there is nowhere else for them to go but up. I spoke with them recently at a local coffee shop prior to their show at The Biergarten in Boulder to pick their brains on their roots, influences, and what they might expect on their ascent.

Public Safety.

Public Safety.

Do you guys want to start off with your background? Where you’re from and how you feel like that shaped the artists you are today?

Bear: Well, Jimmy and I actually founded Public Safety back in Charleston two and a half years ago. We were down at the College of Charleston, and he and I met and we started [Public Safety] as more of a college party band. And then, I decided I wanted to transfer back here and do music and asked him to come with me and he came and we re-formed Public Safety with you guys. (looks to other band mates)

Jimmy: Yeah, we started in September of 2015.

Do you feel like Boulder is a better platform for your music?

Bear: We’ve only played Boulder like, three or four times. We mostly perform in Denver; yeah we’re out of Denver. That’s where I was born and raised and he came six months after I moved back and I kinda got my feet wet in the Denver scene.

Jimmy: This whole area, just like Colorado, is way more of a scene than what we had in South Carolina where we were at, so definitely a good decision to come out here.

Bear: And it’s crazy how quickly it’s growing, too.

Ethan: Oh yeah, the scene is getting a lot bigger for sure.

How do you guys like the scene here in Colorado?

Bear: I don’t know the Boulder scene too well yet, but I’ve definitely seen a lot of bands in Boulder and a lot of bands come out of Boulder. But the Denver scene is crazy, it’s just exploded. It’s so fun to be a part of.

Ethan: There’s some people doing some cool stuff in Boulder, like the Cosmic Collective guys who we just did a podcast with a couple weeks ago. [Eric] is doing some cool stuff, he’s a super nice guy.

Agreed. What kind of environment do you guys like to create when you perform?

Bear: Rowdy! I like it to be lit to the max! (laughs) But, I’m very into hip hop and that stuff so I try to make it really hype.

Ethan: It’s definitely a party feel.

Jimmy: We definitely like people dancing.

Bear: I hump my mic stand quite a bit. (laughs)

Lem: This will be my first time [performing with Public Safety].

Bear: Yeah he’s brand new. Only his second show with us. We had a different drummer for a little while, and we found this guy right here, and we felt he matched the vibe a lot better and I think it’s just the right move. We’re about to record the first really album at Coupe Studios here in Boulder, actually. So we’re excited about that.

What can your listeners expect from that album coming up?

Bear: What do you guys think? (turns to bandmates)

Jimmy: I think it’s gonna be rolling with a way tighter sound; more production. We’ve taken the time to put the songs together in a better way. Last time [we recorded] we didn’t really have an idea of what to create in the studio and this time we have a way more clear vision. If anything else, it will just be upgraded with the drums, so it’s just gonna be way better.

Bear: Just fuego. There’s gonna be some fire in there. There’s some sensual songs, there’s some darkness in there, and then there’s a couple rock songs. A lot of angry songs about my ex-girlfriend.

Ethan: It’s a lot of emotions! The whole spectrum.

Bear: Yeah, if you watch the progression of my lyrics, they’re very indicative of what’s going on in my life. If I’m in a bad mood, I’m writing songs like ‘Retrograde’ just about being mad. ‘Impulse Control’ is about being mad too.

Ethan: (laughs) You’re just an angry individual!

Bear: I’m actually a very jovial man, full of joy and happiness.

Ethan: It’s good to vent.

Bear: It’s good to vent. Yeah, what better way to get back at somebody who’s hurt you than to throw it in a song?

Ethan: Make a bunch of other people sing it with you.

Bear: Yeah, have a bunch of people sing along.

So do you write the majority of the songs Bear?

Bear: Jimmy writes music and I write lyrics for the most part. It’s kind of interchangeable as well. He’s written some verses for ‘Night Call,’ which is a song I’ve been working on for a long time; it’s gonna be on the album. I had the basic outline and he comes in and is like, ‘Alright, well I hear this’ and we put it together. That’s why I think I had Jimmy come out here because we had such a good connection with songwriting and performing.

What genre would you guys classify yourself as fitting into, or not fitting into?

Bear: We say rock and soul.  

Jimmy: It’s a big variety. It’s definitely rock-based, for sure. It’s definitely hard hitting, but we like to get soulful too.

Bear: We get down and dirty. We also get hype.

Lem: I’ve wanted to play rock too and this is the first band I ever get to play rock with. As much as I’ve wanted to, I just always get R&B or gospel or funk. So this is awesome to change it up.

How long have you been playing?

Lem: Professionally, for like thirteen years. But pretty much since I was three.

Bear: Somehow he wanted to end up with this band, somehow he said yes.

Lem: It worked out.

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Is there anybody that you feel like you make your music for?

Bear: The ladies. I think that we fit into the multiple niches or sections of music. We have the rock stuff, almost Royal Blood. We have one song that’s almost like Rage Against the Machine. But we also fit into the pop scene with Kaleo or Twenty One Pilots that you hear on the radio who have a lot of musicianship but also have that sing-along pop. We have more deep tracks as well.

Are those artists that you named who you draw a lot of inspiration from?

Bear: I think we all have different people who are inspirations to us.

Ethan: I know there’s a lot of bands that I listen to that they don’t. We definitely all pull from different music genres and have a lot of overlap. Like I listen to a lot of classic rock, a lot of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, that kind of stuff. Jimmy listens to a lot of Jimi Hendrix and a lot of rock’n’roll.

Bear: I really like Motown. James Brown is probably, on stage, my hero. That’s the guy I really look up to, how he takes control of the stage, takes control of the entire arena. That’s amazing for me.

Jimmy: I think the one thing we all have in common is that we love jamming. The song is the main goal- at the end of the day we just wanna have a good song to start from.

Bear: [Lem’s] best quote ever is, ‘It’s about the feel not the fill.’

Lem: I know that sounds strange- most people are like, ‘What do you mean?’ I mean the feel- like the soul, feelings, emotions you get versus doing a whole bunch of licks on drums. That nostalgia that you get.

Ethan: It’s more about the melody than anything.

Bear: I was sold when I saw that [quote]. I knew he needed to be in the band. That is the quintessential piece. Something I’ve noticed about all these guys is this drive to be better and know that we can always be better. That’s something that I really respect from everybody here. No one’s ever really happy after a show- we find areas where we need to work on. On stage there’s so much confidence and [we] come out with a bang, but at the end of the day we’re always looking to get better.  

Ethan: I think we’re our own hardest critics for sure.

Where do you see Public Safety going?

Bear: 13 nights at MSG.

Ethan: 17 in 17! We just gotta wait for 3017.

Bear: I wanna be one of those bands. When people think about the Colorado scene exploding, and they think about The Lumineers, Nathaniel Rateliff, Motet… I wanna be in that list. I think we’re on our way. There’s been a lot of traction, it’s just about finding the right people to get in our corner.

Ethan: I think the only place we’re going is to the top, honestly. There’s nowhere else to go.

Lem: It’s definitely the dream. It’s all we’re trying to do forever, and ever and ever. We have to go to the top.

Bear: We work, we show up to gigs on time, we don’t get shitfaced before shows. Everybody is on it, we know our parts. We have a contract and a bunch of agreements we’ve made. I’ve been in good bands but never had the confidence like I do in us right now. All [of us are] excited about what we’re doing which is really inspiring and motivating.

Ethan: We’ve only been playing seriously for about a year, and it’s pretty cool to see all the crazy things we’ve done in that limited time. We’ve toured around a bit; played some festivals in front of a few thousand people.

Bear: We’re headed down to the East Coast, back to Charleston in March doing a 14-stop tour. We’re pretty excited about that, that’ll be a lot of fun.

To the top it is. Keep up with Public Safety here.

-Annie

All photos per the author. All videos and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Illenium Ends 2017 With A Sold-Out Tour And A Slot At Coachella

By: Elizabeth Lee

2017 was a huge year for the world of electronic music. We saw the return of old veterans such as deadmau5 and the coming of his new protege REZZ with her unique, dark industrial sound. A huge genre turn around occurred, as big room house faded and set the scene for dubstep and its subgenre riddim. Long-standing king of bass music Excision pulled off one of the most successful first festivals in history with the birth of Lost Lands Music Festival in Ohio. But there was another name who had been rising to fame long before this last year. 2017 was the year everything paid off for Denver-based producer Nick Miller, otherwise known as Illenium.

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Illenium came from humble beginnings as a producer who released several remixes on Soundcloud and then eventually his debut EP Ashes in 2016. His music captured the hearts of fans who were looking for the emotional depth and complexity no other other artists seemed to be able to replicate. From there he shot to fame, touring and playing major festivals across the US and the rest of the world. September 2017 saw the release of his sophomore album Awake.

Nick Miller.

Nick Miller.

BolderBeat was lucky enough to catch the last stop of his sold-out Awake tour at Shrine Expo Hall in Los Angeles on December 28th.

The venue was packed and buzzing with an excited crowd warming up to the sounds of artists Dabin and Said the Sky. Delivering over an hour and half of music, once Illenium took the stage each person watching was enraptured and caught in a beautifully woven soundscape. With a live keyboard and drum pad setup, he dropped tracks such as “Sound of Walking Away” ft. Kerli and “Rush Over Me,” his song with artists Seven Lions, Said the Sky, and HALIENE. Fans of his older album would also recognize classics such as “Afterlife” and “It’s All on U.” Dabin and Said the Sky returned to the stage to join him for a few tracks on electric guitar and piano. Besides his ability to create a fully immersive experience, Illenium also demonstrated his versatility as an artist as he played his unreleased collaboration with Kill the Noise and Mako. This track strayed away from his usual melodic style and into heavier dubstep. He continued to delight the crowd throughout the night with a mixture of heart-wrenching melodies and energetic beats.

As a recently announced artist on the 2018 Coachella lineup, we’re looking forward to what’s next for Illenium. Keep up with him here.

-Elizabeth

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Kyle Emerson Invites You Into His Living Room In New Video For "Wise Blood"

By: Hannah Oreskovich

2017 was arguably a breakout year for Denver’s Kyle Emerson. The former Plum member released an EP, Worth It, in May of last year, which he followed up just a few months later with Dorothy Alice, his debut full-length album via Guilty Pleasure Records. OpenAir CPR called Worth It one of the best records of the year, and both Denver Post’s The Know and Marquee Magazine listed Dorothy Alice as one of the top Colorado albums of 2017.

Kyle Emerson.

Kyle Emerson.

Though Emerson’s solo sound careens with components of his former life as a psych-rocker in Plum, there are more traces of jazz and folk in his latest work. He’s combined drippy guitars with synth sounds, a slide guitar with Beatles-esque pop harmonies, and soft, Elliott Smith-like vocals with upbeat and catchy melodies. These elements paired with the slacker-rock revival vibes of someone like Kurt Vile and the production work of Sunboy’s Justin Renaud have formed much of what you’ll hear on Dorothy Alice, and more specifically on Emerson’s single “Wise Blood.”

Today, Emerson has released a video for “Wise Blood,” which you can check out in our exclusive premiere below. It showcases Emerson and his bandmates (who are somewhat of their own Colorado supergroup, with members from Paper Bird, Shady Elders, Bluebook, and Sunboy) in a living room performance interspersed with scenes of the band cruising around Denver and generally hanging out. The video has a vintage film look in certain parts and meanders with the song’s melody from scene to scene.

Kyle Emerson has arguably made more noise in the Denver music scene in mere months than most, and is a Colorado artist you should be following if you weren’t already. Make sure to give Dorothy Alice a listen here and “Wise Blood” a view above.

What will 2018 hold for Emerson and his supergroup? We’re stoked to find out.

Keep up with Kyle Emerson here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Spiral Cell Releases Eerie Music Video For "Prologue"

By: Norman Hittle

Near the end of 2016, Scott Uhl, the man behind Spiral Cell, brought us his first full release with The Maze in the Tree Rings, a highly conceptual album blending the lines of progressive rock with contemporary video game soundtracks that had us questioning artificial intelligence versus reality. Now at the crest of 2018, he’s released the premiere video for the first song of from that record, aptly known as “Prologue.”

I won’t go into too much detail, but my first impressions of the video were that it was either: A) a post apocalyptic world with someone visiting from another planet perhaps to gain knowledge of Earth's demise, or B) someone surfacing from a sci-fi bunker after some cataclysmic world event. Either way, it’s mysterious, thrilling, and seems to fit well with the actual music.

I got a moment to catch up with Scott via a phone interview, and though he admits the video fits nicely into his conceptual creation for The Maze in the Tree Rings, he also wasn’t about to spoil my own interpretations of his music and the video. Spiral Cell is highly conceptual through and through, and though Scott admits he has a vision for what the story of the video is, he stands true on the ideal that “art is in the eye of the beholder,” which means he wants us to have the freedom to take from what he creates instead of telling us what Spiral Cell is fully about.

What Scott was willing to tell us about Spiral Cell and the video for “Prologue” without spoiling any surprises were some behind-the-scenes details:

First and foremost, the same people involved in the recording of the music are featured in the video. Scott’s wife Danielle, who is featured singing on some tracks of his last record, was the makeup designer and a body double; the “woman” creature is Mackenzie Beyer, who was the voice of “the guide” on several tracks;  and of course, Scott himself is the hazmat suit-wearing, flashlight-wielding explorer.

Scott also shared that though the video was filmed on three different locations on three different nights, each night of filming, observers called the police to the film scene due to the creepy nature of him walking around with a flashlight and hazmat suit and because the fog machines used were mistaken for fires. Yet, he said in each situation the police allowed them to continue their production and wished him well in its completion.

Scott Uhl. Photo Credit: Underexposed.

Scott Uhl. Photo Credit: Underexposed.

One of my favorite behind-the-scene hints came up when I asked Scott about how he was structuring “Prologue” into the storyline of the The Maze in the Tree Rings concept. The end of the video seems open-ended, as if it could be a finality or just the beginning, and “Prologue” in name and as the first song on the album begs the question: Is it the actual beginning, or is he telling a story in reverse Tarantino-fashion? Scott of course was enigmatic about all of it, but informed me that “Prologue” is not necessarily the beginning nor end of the story. “There are some subtle hints in the actual song that allude to where in the story ‘Prologue’ actually falls,” Scott told me, but he wants to leave it up to the listener to decide. Challenge accepted!

If you have yet to check out The Maze in the Tree Rings, I would liken it to a solid union between The Dear Hunter and Stephen Wilson. Take a listen below:

Spiral Cell may also have more for us on the horizon. “Though I wish I could make a video for every song, that’s not likely within my budget, but there will be more,” Scott said. He’s already planning a live performance video for one of the songs, but does not have a date set for its release.

Keep up with Scott and Spiral Cell on Facebook.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Indigenous Robot Take You To Space With "One World"

By: Norman Hittle

Denver’s Indigenous Robot are not your run-of-the-mill “out there” sort of band. Instead, they’re more a culmination of "out there" ideals ranging from hints of indie legends The Flaming Lips to psychedelic rock legends The Doors. Even better, they just released a video that sums up their artistry for their latest song “One World.” Check it out:

As you can see, Indigenous Robot doesn’t hesitate to put it all out there. Their video (which looks to be filmed at none other than Colorado Springs' own Garden of the Gods) highlights a retro Star Trek vibe while managing to include some modern day video tech, which is fitting because a lot about Indigenous Robot and their sound is modernly retro. The video has already won "Outstanding Music Video" by Zed Fest Film Festival

Indigenous Robot.

Indigenous Robot.

Regarding their song “One World,” the band does well both grounding the listener with their gritty dirge-like bass and guitar while also allowing the mind to wander with shimmering vocal effects over calm singing and synths. Interestingly enough, the band’s ability to create an almost mundane, yet groove-laden arrangement manages to hook the listener and leaves a haunting reverie throughout the experience. It reminds me a great deal of some of Queens of the Stone Age’s deeper cuts and fan favorites “I Think I Lost My Headache” and “Gonna Leave You”.

If you enjoy “One World” check out Indigenous Robot's 2014 release Revolting and their 2013 EP Castles.

Keep up with Indigenous Robot here.

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Poets & Wolves Bring Their Alternative Indie Dance Pop Sound Alive At Denver Show

By: Nathan Sheppard

Poets & Wolves played Your Mom's House last week, with Adventure Nothing and The Ugly Architect. The intimate show started with a mix of original songs and solid covers by Adventure Nothing. Then The Ugly Architect, an outfit from Fort Collins, took the stage and bumped up the energy with their exuberant performance style and fun-loving stage presence.

Poets & Wolves.

Poets & Wolves.

The Greeley-based band Poets & Wolves finished off the night with a solid set. The alternative indie four-piece use a wide variety of influences and genres to create a sound unique to themselves. They mix slow, melodic bass with catchy guitar riffs to get you dancing while simultaneously keeping alt chill elements strong throughout their catchy, grooving tunes.

The group opened their set with songs from their debut EP To The Moon, having only released two double-single records prior. Poets & Wolves also did a cover of Linkin Park's “Waiting For The End” with their own alt emo twist. They topped off the night with one of their older singles, “Pretty Little Mess,” which sent the night off with a stomping frenzy.

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You can stream Poets & Wolves’ music on all platforms and keep up with them on Facebook. Though this was the band’s last show of 2017, you can see them January 11th at Globe Hall with Stereoshifter, Echoes In Reverie, and Wolf Poets.

-Nathan

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Trevor Hall Bringing 'The Fruitful Darkness' To Cervantes' Denver for New Year's Eve

By: Trevor Ryan

Veteran singer/songwriter Trevor Hall has just released his new EP The Fruitful Darkness PT. 1, a three-track record that leads off with the mellow acoustic riffs of the title track. This particular song appeals to the wanderer in us all. As Hall croons, “I had to find my way through,” his raspy vocals are accompanied only by his guitar and a small choir near the end.

Listen to The Fruitful Darkness PT. 1:

Next is a slightly more upbeat tune with the follow up track, “What I Know,” a song that shows off the reggae roots that Hall is known for, but features an R&B feel as well. From here, we’re set up for more catchy rhythm and synth work with the final track, “Wander.” His smooth voice grooving, “my home is where I wander, body and soul” shows Hall’s rawness and gives us a welcomed twist to a more standard, overall R&B feel. The feels are strong with this one.

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Be sure to keep up with Trevor Hall on Facebook and catch him at Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom on NYE weekend, December 30th and 31st. You can find tickets here.

-Trevor

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Grayson County Burn Ban Release Second Single From Upcoming Debut Record 'Better Neighbor'

By: Hannah Oreskovich

Denver’s Grayson County Burn Ban first came together in 2014 after frontman Austen Grafa was on the road with another Colorado band and decided he wanted to combine two of his favorite genres: country and rock’n’roll. Having grown up in Texas, Grafa was inspired by songwriters like Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker, Terry Allen, and Robert Earl Keen. After teaming up with fellow Denver musicians Nate Wilson, Travis Page, Brian Beer, and Tyler Brewer (Ned Garthe Explosion), GCBB was formed and Grafa began using his influences to craft what is now considered the band’s “campfire country” sound.

This January, GCBB are releasing their debut record, titled Better Neighbor. The title track from the 12-song release is already out with an accompanying music video (see above), and one that is hard for any Denverite not to laugh along with. It details (rather sarcastically) some of the trials of Denver city life, like trying to park in Cap Hill, or the frustration many have faced when finding recyclable beer cans in the trash bin after day-drinking in Cheesman Park. The song’s refrain, “Are you an idiot? Or just an asshole?” will have you laughing as the band members experience other annoyances while venturing around their neighborhood and asking you to be the exact thing the title of their new record suggests.

Today, the band has released their second single and accompanying video for their song “Up Here.”

Animated by artist, Sarah Letteny, the video follows a character slowly climbing up a ladder in black and white while reflecting on the world down below before it falls through a psychedelic-colored sky back to its colorless reality. As the chorus repeats, “I’m higher than I’ve ever been/looking down at this little world I’m in/Everything is making sense/but I don’t know if I should be alone up here,” things like money and cars appear just out of reach of the video’s character before it crashes through the clouds.

Said Grafa about the video, “Sarah did an amazing job bringing our vision to life for this song, which is, as the lyrics state, all about being ‘a little too high,’ where you can see everything going on, but maybe you shouldn’t be so high alone.”

“Up Here” continues GCBB’s “campfire country” sound with Grafa’s rolling, storytelling vocals over guitar before it breaks into a full-band-at-your-favorite-dive-bar slow country jam.

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Grayson County Burn make the kind of music you want to crush cans to. Just make sure you recycle those when you're finished.

Keep up with Grayson County Burn Ban here.

-Hannah

Follow Hannah on Instagram and Twitter.

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Review: Gasoline Lollipops' New Record 'Soul Mine' Leaves Nothing Left Unsaid

By: Julia Talen

Colorado's beloved alt-country band Gasoline Lollipops release their new album Soul Mine  this month, with a vinyl release party happening December 16th at The Fox Theatre in Boulder. The band will be making their homecoming after a long stint in Europe touring throughout Belgium and the Netherlands. Fans and listeners will not be disappointed, as this album gives us the rugged-punk, country rock’n’roll sound fans know and love while exploring themes of emotional heartbreak, pain, motivation, and growth. The opening track and title of the album hint at the content within, as the band welds together folk and untamed alternative-country-rock to produce a record full of depth, stories, and music that compels listeners to take a stand while also contemplating.

Gasoline Lollipops at Red Rocks. Photo: Hannah Oreskovich

Gasoline Lollipops at Red Rocks. Photo: Hannah Oreskovich

Clay Rose's voice immediately reminded me of the likes of Tom Waits and Leonard Cohen; deep, gritty and dark, yet sustained with unwavering intensity and truth. The title track begins with a soulful, bluesy opening accompanying Rose's rich vocals and the band's groovy guitar solos. Lyrics like "started out digging for diamonds and gold/now I'm digging through the long, dark night of the soul/to see dawn" and "love springs from deep wells/faith is born in the forge of hell/forge on" allude to the theme of the album: one of transformation. "Soul Mine," evolves as a track as well. At one point the refrain builds and then pulls back, stripped down to bare instruments and vocals, only to rebuild into an epic finish that swells. This engrossing track sets the tone for the album as listeners dive deep into stories of loss and evolution.

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The first half of the album is filled with songs that showcase Gasoline Lollipop's eclectic style and ability to explore country rock beyond the confines of a genre. Rose's profound voice sounds subterranean and electrified at times, while other times rustic and lightened, yet still powerful. Drum beats, guitar solos, and harmonic keys shine through in many of the tracks as listeners settle into the tales that the album chronicles. "Woman and a Gun," the third track, begins slowly and vocally; it sounds like a story told near a fire out west about an outlaw named Jessie. The tune's refrain breaks the early, rustic, folktale feel as the track builds. The second half of the song surges with lyrics, "all my faith is a bullet/all my God is a gun/all this world was just smoke and mirrors/I'm gonna break them one by one." After repeating the last verse, "gonna break them one by one," the song launches into a fast, dynamic progression full of intricate guitar solos and percussion that intensifies, elevating the ending of the track by taking it to an edge.

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As the album continues, listeners move through songs of heartbreak. "Casanova" wavers in and out of a harsh rock’n'roll sound and a slow, somber refrain: "If a man goes livin'/for the heart for too long/he's bound to be eaten alive." The track "Montreal" details an ending and nostalgia for the past, as GasPops evoke emotion and leave nothing left unsaid.

"Burns" comes soon after and opens with strings that cry out from the start. There is an evocative darkness hovering over the track, that reminded me of The National. However, Rose's voice builds and breaks boundaries as he repeats "and it burns" towards the end of the track. This one gave me chills, because once again, it felt like GasPops were taking me into the fire with them. Their music goes beyond instruments and vocals; their passionate lyrics, layered with brilliant instrumentals, grab you and take you into an experience they construct with their music, one in which you feel the pain from a past memory that their music expresses in the present moment.

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After exploring more heavy transformation and darkness with tracks titled, "Ghost of a Man," and "Leaving Alone," the album ends with the tune, "Put me to the Task," a hopeful send off, complete with elements of upbeat country rock. The steel guitar and violin liven the tune along with Rose's vocals and the warm harmonies that round out the refrain. The bass carries through and lights a spark under the folds of sound that grow throughout the song. The song finishes off with lyrics, "Well I know/time has come to make good what we don't/but I'm eager to please." We are left with some light at the end of this dark, yet resounding album.

Soul Mine takes listeners to a vulnerable threshold, all the while showcasing the band's dynamic sounds, sounds that truly liberate them from one specific genre. This mighty and gripping album is one that listeners can relate to, contemplate, and even dance to, making it an album that anyone can connect with. Don't miss Gasoline Lollipops album release party on December 16th at The Fox Theatre, followed by their NYE show December 31 at Hodi's Half Note in Fort Collins!           

-Julia

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Augustus Release New Single "Demons" From Upcoming EP

By: Andrew Wright

In the dizzying internet world where all the different kinds of music thrown at you can be overwhelming, to the pop-dominated airwaves of half-dead radio, it is a touch of awesome nostalgia to hear simple, cool, straightforward rock and roll. The Boulder-based band Augustus are a call back to this music, the kind that simply exudes cool without trying.

“Demons” is the first single from the band’s forthcoming EP, which is due out in the spring of 2018. “Demons” is simple in its form as a rock song, but this is a good thing. The most important lesson I ever learned in music theory class was to write music and then have the theory make sense of it; in other words it’s ok to be simple when the music is actually good. Augustus have accomplished this powerful principle with “Demons,” making this band yet another solid one in the ever-growing pool of awesome talent in Colorado. With bluesy guitars under frontman Colin Kelly’s thick and reverb-y vocals, to the rock-heavy drum patterns on this track, “Demons” is a perfect wave of rock’n’roll.

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“Demons” is the first of two singles to be released from the band’s Denver Art Institute sessions, where drummer Jay Elliot is an adjunct professor. Members Jim Herlihy (guitar) and Chad Mathis (bass) tracked their instruments live at DAI along with Elliot (drums) and students from an advanced audio course helped engineer the sessions, making this song bleed even more Colorado music community vibes. The vocals and lead guitar were tracked at Casa Nostra Studios in Boulder by Kelly (vocals/guitar), with mastering by Dominick Maita.

Augustus have plans to release a music video for "Demons" soon. You can keep up with this four-piece rock'n'roll outfit and their next EP here.

-Andrew

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Optycnerd & Play Pat Join Forces For 'Nonfiction' EP

By: Norman Hittle

Denver’s latest collaboration EP Nonfiction brings OptycNerd and Play Pat together with four tracks that are certain to get some winter dance parties grooving. Check it out:

OptycNerd is an electronic hip-hop/pop duo based in Denver. After meeting at a party and realizing they both had the same first name, Chris Kimmel and Chris Scott knew immediately that they had to form a group. Over the past few years, the Chris' have been crafting their sound and building up their body of work, including their released December 3rd single “Apollo” which is currently in the top 10 running for 93.3 KTCL’s Hometown for the Holidays - and you can vote on until December 12th!

Play Pat is an indie hip-hop artist with a great deal of work under his belt, including his most recent November 2017 release “Uber to Space”. Although he seems to keep his personal information under the radar, Play Pat has a solid SoundCloud following, including multiple tracks with over 10k+ plays- no small feat!

Optycnerd with Play Pat.

Optycnerd with Play Pat.

With their Nonfiction collaboration, both artists bring a solid hip-hop/rap effort to the table, featuring sounds reminiscent to Disclosure, Macklemore, and even nods to artists like Kendrick Lamar on their track “Photoshoot”. Yet, this isn’t the first collaboration these artists have had together, and likely it won’t be their last. Back in September, they combined their powers for the first time on the single “PM AM,” a far more pop/hip-hop oriented track.

Keep up with both acts via their social media, and keep an ear out for more material to be released. These guys are serious about content creation, so if you like what you hear, keep checking back!

-Norman

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Local Artists Come Together To Benefit Denver's Mango House For Refugees

This Saturday, December 9th, several Denver artists will come together to support the Mango House on East Colfax, a basic needs pantry for Denver’s refugee community. Mango House, which is currently open one day per week, serves as a free clinic, food pantry, dentist, and youth program integrator, and is free to the refugee community.

Saturday’s festivities have been coordinated by Anthony Ruptak and Corrie Ehler. The night will feature performances by Venus Cruz (KUVO Jazz Odyssey), David Burchfield, Los Mocochetes (Youth On Record) and Ruptak.

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Said organizer Ruptak, “These concerts serve in an effort to raise awareness of the critical needs of our refugee community, raise money and donations, and to support equality, inclusion, and acceptance of our neighbors in this incredibly dark and tumultuous time.”

Attendees are asked to bring a donation of food, clothing, housewares, or toiletries in exchange for a free concert ticket, food, and crafts.

More information on this night at Mango House can be found here.

Throwback Punk Music Meets The Chainsmokers For Emo Nite Day Music Festival

By: Benjamin Tillis

On December 3rd, BolderBeat geared up in all black to attend Emo Nite Day, a three year anniversary celebration of the increasingly popular Emo Nite party, which consists of events held all around the country geared towards lovers of “emo music” from the late 90s and early 2000s. The multi-staged festival held at Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles featured some big names performances, including The Used and Machine Gun Kelly, and From First To Last, the band that Sonny Moore played in before he garnered worldwide fame as Skrillex, and which he has recently rejoined. Sadly, Skrillex did not join the group on stage at Emo Nite Day, but he has made surprise appearances at other Emo Nite events. There were other unexpected surprises, though, as the night ended with a one song performance from Demi Lovato and an hour-long set by The Chainsmokers.

The most memorable act was The Used’s acoustic set, performed by the band’s lead singer Bert McCracken and guitarist Justin Shekoski. Taking in all of the appreciation from the crowd, it was clear the duo were as happy to be there as the rest of the attendees. The climax of their show was when they played fan-favorite “The Taste of Ink,” a song recognizable to even those who don’t necessarily have a nostalgia for this type of music. And like many other performers throughout the night, Bert dedicated his last song to the great musicians we have lost throughout the past couple of years. They ended with the song “It’s Hard to Say,” a track about mentor David Bowie.

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Although Emo Nite Day honors overly emotional hardcore punk music, it seemed to also be a celebration of millennials. The “DJ sets” may have merely been members of bands you hadn’t heard about in years “pressing play” on songs that weren’t necessarily theirs, and often repeating songs other groups had already played (Jimmy Eat World’s “The Sweetness” played three times in two hours). But having these band members playing these angry oldies was exactly what the early 20 to late 30-year-olds in the crowd wanted, as each song inspired a new mosh pit and singing at the top of each concert goer's lungs.  

The peak of this millennialism occurred when The Chainsmokers joined pop-trio Captain Cuts for the final performance of the night. Each song followed the same pattern, and one that would leave any one of our parents incredibly confused. It began with a Yellowcard, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Blink 182 chorus, followed by an extremely hard-hitting dubstep drop. This meant the crowd went from jumping up and down singing the words to these classics to instantly getting into Vegas club mode and grinding on anyone near. At one point, The Chainsmokers even put together a pretty creative mix of Dashboard Confessional’s “Hands Down” and DJ Snake/AlunaGeorge’s “You Know You Like It.” Right before the EDM breakdown when AlunaGeorge repeats the lyric “down,” The Chainsmokers threw in the beginning lyric of Dashboard’s famous verse with the word “hands,” combining the songs to create a millennial medley. It was truly a party by the end of the night.

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Be sure to check out other Emo Nite events going around the country here. Even their smaller events are filled with the same high energy and special guests! It’s something you should do at least once if you have a soft spot for depressing love ballads and the bands that made many of our teenage years so darn emotional.

-Benjamin

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the festival featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Dynohunter Evoke The Depth And Expansiveness The EDM Scene Is Craving

By: Mirna Tufekcic

Boulder, Colorado, a city closely associated with bluegrass and jam bands, is also home to thriving EDM musicians. Born out of the Lotus and STS9 jam scene, Boulder’s own Dynohunter is a hybrid of electronic dance music production and live band improvisation. Pulling electronic influences from house, techno, and electronica, while continuing to be influenced by their instrumental funk, jazz, and jam roots; blending electronic influences with live saxophone, drums and bass, Dynohunter evoke the depth and expansiveness the EDM scene is craving.

Dynohunter.

Dynohunter.

The trio has been around since 2010 and they’ve come a long way in their time as a band. Clark Smith has been keeping Dynohunter fresh with sax, keys, and percussion while mixing and producing the music, Fred Reisen adds the essential drooling low bass grooves, and drops a synth note when appropriate, Nic Thornsberry seamlessly kicks the drums and SPD-SX.  Blend these with tasteful original electronic soundscapes peppered with other organic instruments (like a conch shell, for example) and you got yourself an EDM journey deep into the universe (or jungle, or ocean, or insert your own temperature and atmosphere preference here). You are bound to at least bob your head, if you’re not fully compelled to dance.   

Watch Dynohunter’s recent live session at Knew Conscious:

Clark’s sparking creativity stems from his take on the music genre, “I just feel like EDM, Techno, and House music have so much untapped potential and unexplored pockets that intrigue and excite me. With other music genres, it feels like most avenues have already been explored.”

Dynohunter.

Dynohunter.

Early on in their career, the band played alongside the likes of Sunsquabi, Infected Mushroom, Shpongle, The New Deal, Papadosio and more. They’ve toured the country and have performed at music festivals coast to coast including Summercamp, Joshua Tree Music Festival, Sonic Bloom, and Arise. But along with their successes, the band has also dealt with tough loss. In April 2016, the band’s drummer and dear friend Justin Ehmer passed away after a long battle with cancer. Justin was a key member of the band who poured his heart and soul into the project. Since then, Dynohunter has pushed on, healing with time, but keeping Justin’s spirit alive in their music. A picture of his smiling face still stands behind the drums in Dynohunter’s home studio, a place the band has recently been working hard in.

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Dynohunter’s 2015 full length album The Nomad was well received; since then they have released four EPs, with Rattle the Cage being their most recent. Their fifth and upcoming EP titled Tilmun is scheduled for release on December 13th, with the single dropping December 6th, just a couple of days before they headline The Bluebird Theater in Denver.

Dynohunter at Knew Conscious.

Dynohunter at Knew Conscious.

Being a musical experience of their own, Dynohunter is well worth seeing live.  If you can catch them this Friday, December 8th at The Bluebird Theater, you’ll be in for a treat with fresh music right out of the studio and onto the stage.

According to Reisen, “[Dynohunter] sure has a way of bringing that experiential aspect of music to life and if you’re coming into it open-minded, you’ll be taken on a journey of higher vibration; an hour and a half experience that leaves you feeling a little bit better and expanded.”  Spoken like a true Boulderite, Fred!

-Mirna

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artist featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.

Premiere: Yasi Talks To Us On Video About Her Inspirations, Artistry, & Fears

The inspiration behind this video stems from Yasi's strong, feminine tone. I wanted to create a visual train of thought that viewers could follow and engage with that would accurately encapsulate who Yasi is, both as a human and an artist. It was important to me to create something that would interest people that are fans, as well as those who may not yet be aware of her music. I felt that by mixing video, photo, design and text, I could create something unique that would enable this attraction.

Catch Yasi next this Friday, December 8th at Globe Hall in Denver.

-Annie

All photos, videos, and embedded tracks per the artists featured and those credited. This feature was edited for brevity and clarity by BolderBeat.